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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Turning a Crawled Website into a Search Engine with PHP
July 06, 2015 @ 10:19:43

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their "Powerful Custom Search Engines with Diffbot" series with part two showing how to take the Diffbot results and make them searchable.

In the previous part of this tutorial, we used Diffbot to set up a crawljob which would eventually harvest SitePoint's content into a data collection, fully searchable by Diffbot's Search API. We also demonstrated those searching capabilities by applying some common filters and listing the results. [...] In this part, we'll build a GUI simple enough for the average Joe to use it, in order to have a relatively pretty, functional, and lightweight but detailed SitePoint search engine. What's more, we won't be using a framework, but a mere total of three libraries to build the entire application.

For those interested in the end result, you can skip to the demo. Otherwise, they'll walk you through the full process:

  • Bootstrapping the environment and needed libraries
  • Creating a simple "home" page with a Diffbot client
  • Creating the frontend interface (a form allowing for various search terms)
  • Making the Javascript to catch the form submission
  • Adding CSS to style the page
  • Building out the PHP backend to perform the different search types (author and keywords)

Finally he ties it all together and create the output of the search results, providing links to each of the matching pages, posting date, author information and a brief summary. He ends the post with a look at paginating the results via a "PaginationHelper" class that will drop a navigation item at the bottom of the results and handle moving from page to page, interfacing with the Diffbot client.

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search engine diffbot tutorial series part2 results crawled website

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/turning-crawled-website-search-engine-php/

NetTuts.com:
Create a Custom API in Magento Part Two
July 03, 2015 @ 10:54:02

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series showing how to create a custom API in Magento. In part one of the series they focused on creating a custom module that worked with the core APIs and system. In this new post they approach it from the other side and show how to use those APIs created in part one.

In this series, we're discussing custom APIs in Magento. In the first part, we created a full-fledged custom module to implement the custom API, in which we created the required files to plug in the custom APIs provided by our module. In this second and last part, we'll go through the back-­end section to demonstrate how to consume the APIs.

They start with a quick recap of the things created in the first part of the series and how to ensure it's set up correctly to be accessed as an API endpoint. Next they set up the user and role configurations that you'll need to access the new API through the administration panel. Finally, they show you how to use the API through a simple SoapClient request.

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magento custom api series tutorial part2 usage

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/create-a-custom-api-in-magento-part-two--cms-23821

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Crawling and Searching Entire Domains with Diffbot
July 02, 2015 @ 09:41:39

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted, the first part in a new series, showing you how to create a "powerful custom search engine" with the help of the Diffbot service. In this first part they help you get everything you need set up (including a VM to run it from).

In this tutorial, I'll show you how to build a custom SitePoint search engine that far outdoes anything WordPress could ever put out. We'll be using Diffbot as a service to extract structured data from SitePoint automatically, and this matching API client to do both the searching and crawling. I'll also be using my trusty Homestead Improved environment for a clean project, so I can experiment in a VM that's dedicated to this project and this project alone.

He walks you through each step of the process, first creating the "crawljob" script and then executing it to gather the results. He also shows how to show this information via a simple GUI when searches are performed. A Diffbot PHP client library makes creating the crawljob simpler and lets you configure things like max number of items to crawl, patterns to match and what URLs to follow on the pages. Running the script creates the job which is then executed immediately. The same library makes search the data simpler too, using a "search" method along with some special tagging, and returning a JSON result with the matching records.

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crawl domain diffbot search engine part1 series tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/crawling-searching-entire-domains-diffbot/

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
AWS PHP SDK Asynchronously
June 30, 2015 @ 11:31:15

Cees-Jan Kiewiet has a new post today talking about some interesting trickery he was able to do with the AWS (Amazon Web Services) PHP SDK to allow requests to be made asynchronously.

Just got off the AWS SDK for PHP Office Hour hangout and it was great talking with both team members Jeremy and Michael. And one of the things we talked about was async access to the AWS services using the PHP SDK. The goal of this post is to get the AWS PHP SDK client working asynchronously.

He starts with brief instructions on getting the SDK installed (via Composer) along with a library of his own that brings in a few other dependencies. The ReactPHP event loop is what makes the asynchronous connections possible. He includes the code to create the new handler stack and how to use it to make the asynchronous calls. A demo screencast is also included in the post to illustrate the output from a simple set of requests.

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aws amazon sdk asynchronous connection reactphp event loop tutorial

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/06/aws-php-sdk-asynchronously/

SitePoint WordPress Blog:
The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate Part 2 Developing a Plugin
June 30, 2015 @ 10:07:50

The SitePoint WordPress blog has posted the second part of their series covering the creation of a WordPress plugin with the help of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate. In this latest article they build on the first part of the series and start in on the actual plugin development.

In the first part of my series, an introduction to the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate, we looked at how the code is organised within the Boilerplate. To continue with this series, we'll apply what we've learnt previously to build a real working plugin. We are going to take a look at how quickly we can get our plugin up and running using the Boilerplate code, with as little work as possible. This article will focus on creating and activating the plugin, as well as developing the admin facing functionality of the plugin.

They show you how to create a simple "time since posted" plugin with a few customizations available. They show how to use the Boilerplate generator to set up the basic plugin file structure and installing it on your WordPress application. From there they show you how to create a simple "Settings" page for the plugin and making it work via the functionality Boilerplate offers. The post then shows how to register the plugin, populate the options page and saving the changes the user makes.

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wordpress boilerplate plugin generator tutorial development lastposted

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/wordpress-plugin-boilerplate-part-2-developing-a-plugin/

Laravelista.com:
JSON Web Token Authentication for Lumen
June 29, 2015 @ 12:07:36

The Laravelista.com site has a new tutorial posted showing you how to integrate JSON Web Tokens (JWT) into a Lumen application. JWTs provide a simple, portable way to share authentication and session information in a more robust way than just a single randomly generated token.

This is my third post on how to build an API with Fractal, but in this post I will be focusing on authentication using JWT (JSON Web Tokens). [...] In Build an API with Lumen and Fractal I have shown you a way of creating an API using Lumen and Fractal. In this post we will continue with the same project called Treeline and implement authentication and protected routes. Also at the very end of the post is a small chapter on when to use Lumen over Laravel.

They make use of the tymon/jwt-auth library to handle the actual JWT functionality including a service provider making it simple to integrate. They talk about "improving Lumen" by adding a configuration directory for the JWT package to put its configuration file. From there they add in the necessary facades and configuring the library itself. Next comes the actual authentication handling that, post login, generates the token and resending it along with each response. Finally, they show you how to set up the protection on routes and verifying the token contents on each request.

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lumen tutorial jsonwebtoken jwt tutorial integration provider authentication

Link: http://laravelista.com/json-web-token-authentication-for-lumen/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Mobile App Development with Zend Studio
June 29, 2015 @ 10:14:41

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted a new tutorial from Daniel Berman about using Zend Studio to create mobile applications in the same interface you're using (if you're a Zend Studio user) to create your PHP applications.

The world has turned mobile. This is not new, and it should therefore be no surprise to anyone that the results of the 2015 DevPulse survey by Zend show that a vast majority of PHP developers are working on, or intend to work on, mobile apps.

Mobile app development poses many challenges for developers, one of which is tying in the front end of the mobile application with the back-end web service APIs. This tutorial describes how to simultaneously create, test and modify both the front and back end of a modern mobile app using Zend Studio's mobile development features.

He breaks the rest of the post up into several steps to help you get a simple mobile project up and running, complete with a basic Apigility API backend:

  • Creating a Cloud Connected Mobile Project
  • Previewing your App
  • Developing the Back-End APIs
  • Developing the Front-End
  • Testing as an Android Native App
  • Exporting a Native Application Package

The end result is a simple "cloud connected" application that can be installed directly on an Android device as a ".apk" package.

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tutorial mobile application zendstudio android api apigility

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/mobile-app-development-zend-studio/

DigitalOcean Community Blog:
How To Deploy a Basic PHP Application using Ansible, Part2
June 26, 2015 @ 09:53:33

Digital Ocean has continued their series about deploying "advanced PHP applications" on an Ubuntu instance via Ansible in part two of the series. If you missed the first part of the series, you can check it out here.

This tutorial is the second in a series about deploying PHP applications using Ansible on Ubuntu 14.04. The first tutorial covers the basic steps for deploying an application, and is a starting point for the steps outlined in this tutorial.

In this tutorial we will cover setting up SSH keys to support code deployment/publishing tools, configuring the system firewall, provisioning and configuring the database (including the password!), and setting up task schedulers (crons) and queue daemons. The goal at the end of this tutorial is for you to have a fully working PHP application server with the aforementioned advanced configuration.

You'll need to finish the first tutorial if you want to follow along here. They pick up where they left off to finish the whole process, starting with a switch to a more advanced example repository. They modify the Ansible configuration and run the playbook to update the host. From there they break things down into several more steps:

  • Setting up SSH Keys for Deployment
  • Configuring the Firewall
  • Installing the MySQL Packages
  • Setting up the MySQL Database
  • Configuring the PHP Application for the Database
  • Migrating the Database
  • Configuring cron Tasks
  • Configuring the Queue Daemon

While a good bit of these steps relate to something Laravel needs (what they use for the sample application), it's still a good overview of the wide range of things you can do with Ansible during deployment.

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deploy ansible digitalocean setup tutorial configure laravel framework part2

Link: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-deploy-an-advanced-php-application-using-ansible-on-ubuntu-14-04

Joe Ferguson:
How I use Laravel Homestead everyday
June 25, 2015 @ 09:21:28

Joe Ferguson has a new post to his site sharing a bit about how he uses Homestead (the Laravel project's virtual machine offering) in his every day development.

I feel like I've been talking about homestead a lot lately. I feel like Vagrant is such an important part of a developer's workflow. If you are still using MAMP, WAMP, or installing Virtual Machines manually you are wasting so much of your own time (and your clients money) by not using prebuilt development environments. [...] I prefer to have my open source projects contain a Vagrant environment so that any potential contributor can easily clone my repository and run "vagrant up". [...] The recent changes to Homestead have brought the option to use Homestead exactly as I do, without having to use my own packages or copy and paste files.

He walks you through the simple process of getting a project set up with this Homestead-per-project configuration:

  • Starting a new Project
  • Adding Homestead as a dependency
  • Make the Homestead configuration for this project

Now when a "vagrant up" is run from the project, Vagrant understands to create a Homestead virtual machine instance, import the base box and configure it to be a locally hosted web server for your application. He also includes instructions for using it with non-Laravel applications and how to share the environment.

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laravel homestead everyday tutorial project dependency vagrant

Link: http://www.joeferguson.me/how-i-use-laravel-homestead-everyday/

Easy Laravel Book:
Using Scopes With Laravel 5
June 24, 2015 @ 11:10:45

The "Easy Laravel Book" website has posted a new tutorial today looking at the use of scopes in Laravel, a packaging method for creating reusable chunks of code for use across the application.

Applying conditions to queries gives you to power to retrieve and present filtered data in every imaginable manner. Some of these conditions will be used more than others, and Laravel provides a solution for cleanly packaging these conditions into easily readable and reusable statements, known as a scope. In this tutorial I'll show you how to easily integrate scopes into your Laravel models.

He starts with a simple example of a "where" clause made into a method having a name starting with "scope". This is a hard-coded scope but he also shows an example of the other option, dynamic scopes, allowing for input from the user as a part of the execution. He also shows a quick example of using these same scopes with relations, making them a part of the "find" result chain.

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laravel5 easylaravelbook scopes tutorial

Link: http://www.easylaravelbook.com/blog/2015/06/23/using-scopes-with-laravel-5/


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