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NetTuts.com:
Laravel, BDD and You The First Feature
November 26, 2014 @ 12:19:37

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their "Laravel, BDD and You" series (part one is here) building on their introduction in part one and building a first feature (what BDD tools call their tests).

In the second part of this series called Laravel, BDD and You, we will start describing and building our first feature using Behat and PhpSpec. In the last article we got everything set up and saw how easily we can interact with Laravel in our Behat scenarios. [...] In short, we are going to use the same .feature to design both our core domain and our user interface. I have often felt that I had a lot of duplication in my features in my acceptance/functional and integration suites. When I read everzet's suggestion about using the same feature for multiple contexts, it all clicked for me and I believe it is the way to go.

He starts in with the creation of the first feature - a simple "welcome" test that evaluates the main Laravel start page. He uses this example to set up a Laravel trait that can be reused in other parts of the testing and how to use it in a Feature Context file. He then starts to create the tests for the sample time tracking application started in part one. He gives an example of the feature file's contents, the result from its execution and the "small refactors" that it will suggest to add functionality to the feature file. With this skeleton in place, he then fleshes out the test to make it actually work with the requests. He walks through each function and provides the code needed for both the test and other tools/objects they need.

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laravel tutorial bdd feature series part2 testing behat phpspec

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/laravel-bdd-and-you-the-first-feature--cms-22486

php[architect]:
Build a VM for Drupal 8 with Vagrant
November 26, 2014 @ 10:22:22

A new tutorial has been posted on the php[architect] site today showing you how to build a VM for Drupal 8 with the help of Vagrant.

At this year's php[world] hackathon, I spent my time getting a Vagrant machine configured to run Drupal 8. I know there are other options, like Acquia's own Dev Desktop, or even Zend Server. However, I like using Vagrant to run my LAMP stacks, especially on OS X. I've never been able to easily run xAMP on non-Linux machines. Installing MySQL can be a pain, system updates can change the version of PHP you're running, and some PHP extensions are really difficult to build-even with Homebrew. Vagrant simplifies getting a working development environment running by automating the provision of a virtual machine for you, usually with a tool like Chef, Puppet, or Ansible.

Oscar (the author) took advantage of some time at the php[world] hackathon to create the necessary files for building this environment. He walks you through the steps to creating the basic vagrant file with "config" options (explaining each one) and walks through the setup of additional options, software like Apache and Drupal. He then sets up the Ansible configuration to create the box, run the provisioning and configuration of the resulting server. Finally, he shows the result of the install if everything was successful.

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drupal8 vagrant vm virtualmachine tutorial introduction configuration provision

Link: http://www.phparch.com/2014/11/build-a-vm-for-drupal-8-with-vagrant/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building an Internationalized Blog with FigDice
November 26, 2014 @ 09:55:44

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted the second part of the series looking at using the FigDice for the templates in your application. In this new post they expand on the basics presented in part one and look at internationalization.

In part one of this two-part series I started looking at FigDice, a PHP templating system that takes a slightly different approach to most. [...] In this second and final part we're going to add a simple blog to our example site, which allows us to look in more detail at Figdice's concept of data feeds. We'll also look at internationalization, translating some of the site's content into a couple of additional languages.

In this part of the series (part two of two) they create a simple blog application based on their "Feed" class from before, faking some basic content. He then creates the factory class the FigDice templating will fetch the data from and makes a view to use it. He also talks about the optional functionality to add additional data to the feed output as attributes on the element. Finally he shows how to work all of this back into the HTTP framework under a "blog/post" URL.

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internationalization figdice template library tutorial series part2

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-internationalized-blog-figdice/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Geospatial Search with SOLR and Solarium
November 25, 2014 @ 13:55:56

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post from Lukas White that gets into the details of combining SOLR searching with Solarium to perform geospatial queries.

In a recent series of articles I looked in detail at Apache's SOLR and Solarium. To recap; SOLR is a search service with a raft of features - such as faceted search and result highlighting - which runs as a web service. Solarium is a PHP library which allows you to integrate with SOLR - whether local or remote - interacting with it as if it were a native component of your application. If you're unfamiliar with either, then my series is over here, and I'd urge you to take a look. In this article, I'm going to look at another part of SOLR which warrants its own discussion; Geospatial search.

He uses a simple example, locating airports near a given location, to give a more "real world" idea of how it all works. He starts by introducing the concept of geospatial searching and the idea of "points" as they relate to a specific location. He then gets into the actual setup of the application, including the SOLR schema configuration and making the queries on the data. The Solarium library allows for simple location queries when given just the "latlong" helper type and the location/distance to use for the starting point. He uses the data from the OpenFlights service to gather the airport data and creates a search form and basic list output of the results from searches on it. If you'd like to see the end result in action, check out this demo website.

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solr search solarium library tutorial geospatial query airport demo

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/geospatial-search-solr-solarium/

NetTuts.com:
Digging in to Laravel's IoC Container
November 25, 2014 @ 12:23:07

NetTuts.com has a new tutorial posted that digs into the Laravel IoC (Inversion of Control) container, one of the key features of the framework making it easy to create and use objects all around your applications.

Inversion of Control, or IoC, is a technique that allows control to be inverted when compared to classical procedural code. The most prominent form of IoC is, of course, Dependency Injection, or DI. Laravel's IoC container is one of the most used Laravel features, yet is probably the least understood.

He starts with an example of basic dependency injection (constructor injection) and how this relates to the Laravel framework's IoC handling (hint: it's all IoC). He includes examples of some built-in Laravel bindings and talks about the difference between shared and non-shared bindings. He also looks at conditional binding, how dependencies are resolved and how you can define your own custom binding implementations. Other topics mentioned include tagging, rebounds, rebinding and extending. He ends the article with a look at how you can use the IoC outside of Laravel too.

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laravel ioc container inversionofcontrol framework tutorial introduction detail

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/digging-in-to-laravels-ioc-container--cms-22167

Rob Allen:
Using Phing to SSH into a Vagrant box
November 25, 2014 @ 10:22:55

In a quick new post to his site Rob Allen shows you how to have Phing SSH into a Vagrant box as a part of the VM creation process. In his case, he uses it to run database migrations.

Now that I've started using migrations, I've discovered a minor irritant. I run this project on a Vagrant VM and have discovered that I keep forgetting to ssh into the vagrant box before running the migrations script. The obvious solution is to automate this and I decided to use Phing to do so.

He walks through the installation of the libssh2 software (if you don't already have it) and the ssh2 PHP extensionSshTask to make the connection as the "vagrant" user and execute the given PHP command.

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vagrant ssh phing migrations automate tutorial vm virtualmachine

Link: http://akrabat.com/php/using-phing-to-ssh-into-a-vagrant-box/

VG Tech Blog:
Using Local Packages as Composer Dependencies
November 25, 2014 @ 09:16:45

On the VG Tech blog this latest post shows you how to use local packages as dependencies in your Composer-enabled applications.

Composer changed pretty much everything when it comes to including dependencies in PHP projects. No more SVN externals or copying large library folders into your project. This is really great, but there's one thing I've been struggling to find a smooth process for; developing dependencies for your project. When implementing your project, the need for some module, library, service provider or something else will arise, and sometimes you'll have to implement it yourself. So, how to do that?

He starts with a list of three suggestions (including actually having the code in the project or mirroring the package) but suggests the last of the three: using a repository with a relative file system setup. He uses the "repositories" configuration option in the Composer config to define a "vcs" type and gives it a path to the package contents. He ends the post with the resulting output of the Composer install command, showing the package pulled in and being able to commit to it just like any other repo.

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local package composer dependencies tutorial repository

Link: http://tech.vg.no/2014/11/25/using-local-packages-as-composer-dependencies/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Getting Started with FigDice
November 21, 2014 @ 12:19:12

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the second part of their series highlighting the FigDice template rendering system. In this latest article Lukas White focuses on FigDice's ability to "pull" data into templates as needed rather than having it injected.

Amongst the many templating systems out there, most work in pretty much the same way; variables are "injected" using some syntax or another, be it curly braces, percentage signs or whatever that library's convention happens to be. They'll usually have basic control structures, such as if...then and, of course, iteration. FigDice, however, takes an altogether different approach. Inspired by PHPTAL - the subject of a future article - it gives the view layer the responsibility of "pulling" in the data it requires, rather than relying on controllers to assemble and "push" it into the templates.

He walks you through the installation of the tool (via Composer) and how to create a basic FigDice view to work with (including template loading). He uses a sample Silex-based application for his examples, making a layout with the FigDice additions to the attributes. He then shows how to make the template for the main index page with a "mute" region for the include logic. He shows how to include this basic template into the view and render it directly as output. Next he shows how to integrate data with the template, pulling in "tweets" from an array dataset via a loop (walk) and a factory to provide the template the data.

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figdice template tutorial series part2 data integration

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/getting-started-figdice/

Michelangelo van Dam:
Running Apigility on Azure
November 21, 2014 @ 11:55:15

Michelango van Dam has a new post on his site today walking you through the process of running Apigility on Windows Azure. Apigility is a project from Zend that makes creating and maintaining APIs much simpler (based on the Zend Framework).

Since a couple of years I've been a fan of Microsoft Azure, the cloud platform by Microsoft. It offers a platform as a service (PaaS) in the form of Azure Websites which makes it a great solution to prototype and to play with new stuff. Last year Matthew Weier O'Phinney announced Apigility at ZendCon, a manager for API design. It was immediately clear that it would revolutionise the way we would design and manage REST API's.

Michelangelo walks you through the entire process, starting locally. He shows you how to clone and set up the latest version of Apigility and create a basic endpoint named "demo". He adds in a bit of code to handle the API request (returning user data) and includes an example of what the REST request looks like. With that up and running, he moves on to the Azure side of things. He shows you how to create a "web.config" file to configure the Azure server and run Composer as the install is being processed. He helps you get an Azure account set up and shows how to set up the website instance where you'll deploy the application, pointing it to a GitHub repository as a deploy source.

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apigility windows azure deploy tutorial introduction rest api

Link: http://www.dragonbe.com/2014/11/running-apigility-on-azure.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Yii 2.0 ActiveRecord Explained
November 20, 2014 @ 09:08:31

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted introducing you to using ActiveRecord in the Yii2 framework to access the information in your databases. The Active Record design pattern where a single object corresponds to a record in the database (and can be manipulated as such).

The ActiveRecord class in Yii provides an object oriented interface (aka ORM) for accessing database stored data. Similar structures can be found in most modern frameworks like Laravel, CodeIgniter, Symfony and Ruby. Today, we'll go over the implementation in Yii 2.0 and I'll show you some of the more advanced features of it.

He introduces the "Model" class first, the based of the ActiveRecord handling, and its parts: attributes, validation and scenarios. He then gets into the creation of the a model instance based off of a table (SQL structure provided) around authors and articles. He includes the code showing how to create a simple model, add in relations and putting it to use. He also shows how to use the built in "find" handling to locate records. Finally he gets into some of the more advanced topics including checking if attributes are "dirty", the "arrayable" functionality and using events/behaviors/transactions on the models.

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yii2 framework activerecord tutorial introduction

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/yii-2-0-activerecord-explained/


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