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Kinsta.com:
Real-World WordPress Benchmarks with PHP5.5 PHP5.6 PHP-NG and HHVM
July 30, 2014 @ 12:26:51

The Kinsta.com blog has a new post with the results of some benchmarking they've done around WordPress comparing PHP 5.5, PHP 5.6 (PHPNG) and HHVM in response time (well, time taken for the request).

If you remember we wrote an article a good couple of months ago when WordPress 3.9 came out that HHVM was fully supported beginning with that release, and we were all happy about it. The initial benchmark results showed HHVM to be far more superior than the Zend engine that's currently powering all PHP builds.

[...] Obviously you have to compromise based on your (or rather your sites') needs but is it worth it? How much of a performance gain can you expect by switching to HHVM? [...] Today I finally took the time to set up a test environment and do some tests to compare a couple of different builds with a fresh out of the box WordPress install and one that has a bunch of content added plus runs WooCommerce!

The testing was all done locally on virtual machines (using Vagrant setups) and two different kinds of test WordPress installations. They share the results in the post, showing the differences between the HHVM installations and the plain PHP ones. The results also show the differences between having the opcode cache on and off. Curious to see how it would perform outside of a local system, they also pushed the same configurations out to a DigitalOcean instance with some slightly different results.

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wordpress benchmark php55 php56 phpng hhvm compare results

Link: https://kinsta.com/blog/real-world-wordpress-benchmarks-with-php5-5-php5-6-php-ng-and-hhvm/

Lorna Mitchell:
What Got You Involved in Open Source?
June 13, 2014 @ 12:16:04

Lorna Mitchell has shares some interesting results of a recent survey asking people how they got involved in working with open source projects. The results were from a poll announced on Twitter.

I did a very unscientific twtpoll recently regarding what brought each of us into open source. Plenty of people took the time to vote or retweet, so I thought I'd loop back around and let you know how it looked overall when the poll closed.

Not surprisingly, the largest group came from the "find a problem, submit a fix" category (40%) with the next in line being the group that open sourced their own code. The third category she mentions, coming in at 18% of the responses, was those seeking new skills either for personal growth or for their current (or next) job.

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opensource involvement poll twitter results developer

Link: http://www.lornajane.net/posts/2014/what-got-you-involved-in-open-source

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Best PHP IDE in 2014 - Survey Results
March 24, 2014 @ 13:15:42

The results are in and the SitePoint PHP blog has officially announced the most popular PHP IDE based on the answers to their survey. The overall winner is PHPStorm (from JetBrains) but several others weigh in on their editor of choice too.

This article will focus on the IDE results alone. We'll analyze the PHP community in general in a future piece after the data has been cleaned to a greater extent. Please note that these are preliminary results, and not much detailed filtering has taken place yet. The data will still be processed and additionally verified. The ballpark is in the correct ranges, but cannot be deemed precise (might be off by a couple dozen in every category - not enough to influence the end result), hence only percentage values will be displayed in the charts. For exact figures, see the raw data.

The results show PHPStorm coming in at first place in both the business and personal votes with Sublime Text and Netbeans pulling in behind for 2nd and 3rd. The post also shares comments from some of the votes, people adding some of their own thoughts and reasons for their choice of editor/IDE. Other tools that were mentioned include Vi, TextMate, Eclipse/PDT and Dreamweaver.

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survey results popular ide editor tool phpstorm sublimetext netbeans

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/best-php-ide-2014-survey-results/

Liip Blog:
HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing
October 29, 2013 @ 10:13:47

On the Liip blog today Christian Stocker shares some of the interesting results he's found when working with Symfony2 on the HipHop VM (based on Facebook's work around the HipHop version of optimized PHP). The project recently announced better framework support, so Christian thought he'd give it a try.

We're currently building a Symfony2 based application, which has pretty high performance requirements (but we can mostly achieve them with varnish), so I went and did some performance tests on that real-life app. [...] In short, the numbers were amazing. I also compared PHP 5.3 with APC against 5.5 with opcache, that alone gave some pretty decent improvements.

He talks about the configuration (hardware and software) he used for the testing and the Apache Bench tool to make the requests. He includes a few tables of the request/response result times comparing the HHVM, PHP 5.3 and PHP 5.5 for:

  • Requests per second, small response
  • Requests per second, middle response
  • Requests per second, large response
  • Median response time in ms, short response
  • Median response time in ms, middle response
  • Median response time in ms, large response

Each also comes with an accompanying graph for those wanting a quick glance version of the results.

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hiphop virtualmachine vm hhvm symfony2 benchmark results

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2013/10/29/hhvm-and-symfony2.html

MySQL Performance Blog:
SSL Performance Overhead in MySQL
October 11, 2013 @ 11:30:28

On the MySQL Performance Blog there's a recent post looking at the impact of SSL in regards to the overall performance of your application. This is part one of a two part series and focuses largely on the results of two tests - one with connection pooling and the other to evaluate connection time.

Some of you may recall my security webinar from back in mid-August; one of the follow-up questions that I was asked was about the performance impact of enabling SSL connections. My answer was 25%, based on some 2011 data that I had seen over on yaSSL's website, but I included the caveat that it is workload-dependent, because the most expensive part of using SSL is establishing the connection. Not long thereafter, I received a request to conduct some more specific benchmarks surrounding SSL usage in MySQL, and today I'm going to show the results.

He details the environments used for testing including the hardware specs and the version of the software installed. The scripts (really just bash scripts that call sysbench) are included in the post and the results of the tests are both graphed out and dumped in tabular form. The results are pretty surprising, mostly having to do with just how much of an impact the SSL has on the the requests. He makes a few recommendations at the end of the post on how you can mitigate these problems though (hint: it's not about MySQL per se).

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performance overhead mysql ssl results benchmark sysbench

Link: http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2013/10/10/mysql-ssl-performance-overhead/

Gary Sieling:
Scraping Google Maps Search Results with Javascript and PHP
July 29, 2013 @ 12:23:21

Gary Sieling has a new post to his site about scraping Google Maps data with a combination of PHP and some simple Javascript. It makes use of callbacks and timers to get the data already returned from their API.

Google Maps provides several useful APIs for accessing data: a geocoding API to convert addresses to latitude and longitude, a search API to provide locations matching a term, and a details API for retrieving location metadata. For many mapping tasks it is valuable to get a large list of locations (restaurants, churches, etc) - since this is valuable, Google places a rate limiter on the information, and encourages caching query results.

He includes the code (both front- and back-end) that you'll need to make the system work. It makes a request to the Google Maps API as usual but then adds a listener with a callback. This takes the latitude/longitude data and runs a "get details" method to get more information. The result is then POSTed to PHP and written out to a file.

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googlemaps google search results scraping api javascript tutorial

Link: http://garysieling.com/blog/scraping-google-maps-search-results-with-javascript-and-php

Aleksey Korzun:
Benchmarking Memcached and Redis Clients
June 19, 2013 @ 11:06:31

Aleksey Korzun has posted some of the results from benchmarking he performed on various Memcached and Redis clients through PHP. His tests focused on multiple PHP client libraries, both user-land and extension based.

As some of you may know, I'm crazy about speed. So when I saw that people were happily using Predis as their choice of PHP client for Redis, I was a bit confused. Why use a client written in PHP for something that should be 'fast' like Redis? That kind of defeats the purpose - unless you don't really care about response times and scalability. [...] The performance difference piqued my interest. I wanted to find out just how much performance users are sacrificing by choosing one implementation over another.

He ran his tests on VirtualBox VM instances with the same specs and the same version of PHP installed. He tested various versions of the Memcached client, Redis client, Predis and the IgBinary extension. His results (Google spreadsheet) show the requests processed using each method based on this benchmarking script.You can visit the post to see the graphs of the results too.

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benchmark memcached redis client graph results

Link: http://alekseykorzun.com/post/53283070010/benchmarking-memcached-and-redis-clients

Systems Architect:
Performance benchmark of popular PHP frameworks
April 24, 2013 @ 12:04:31

On his site today Lukasz Kujawa has a post that compares some performance benchmarks of several popular PHP frameworks including Slim, CodeIgniter, Laravel, Symfony2 and Zend Framework 2.

There are many assumptions around performance of different PHP frameworks. I frequently hear strong opinions about superiority X over Y in this context. There are companies writing new PHP frameworks from scratch because available solutions are too slow for them. What does it really mean? Does the framework performance matters? Before answering this questions lets check how slow is your framework!

He took the "quick start" projects provided for each of the examples and ran some tests with the Apache Benchmark (ab) tool against EC2 instances, all configured the same way. The results weren't overly surprising with Slim beating the others hands down (it's a micro-framework after all) and Kohana and CodeIgniter coming in second and third. The frameworks with more overhead like Zend Framework and Symfony ranked some of the slowest.

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benchmark framework test apachebenchmark ab results

Link: http://systemsarchitect.net/performance-benchmark-of-popular-php-frameworks

Fortrabbit.com:
BETA survey results
August 28, 2012 @ 11:19:54

Fortrabbit.com has conducted a survey of developers world-wide about what kind of platform, tools and software they use in their development work. They've posted the results to their site today, the answers from about 160 different developers.

We have asked our readers a few questions on their PHP workflows, hosting and tools. We are very curious about this, because we want to build the best PHP PaaS for dev guys.

Some of the highlights from their findings include the large share of Zend Framework use, the predominant use of git for deployment, MySQL still being the database of choice and multi-stage deployment (environments) are a preferred setup. You can see the full results here [pdf].

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survey results paas developer pdf


Symfony Blog:
The Symfony Community Survey 2012 The Results
July 27, 2012 @ 07:22:58

On the Symfony Blog there's a new post sharing the results of a recent poll they took of some of their developers covering things like job title, how long they've been working with Symfony and their work with the framework.

Before the Symfony Live Conference in Paris, we conducted the first Symfony community survey. The raffle winners will soon be contacted by Anne-Sophie. And without further ado, here are the survey results!

Results are posted both in numbers and in easy to read graphs to questions like:

  • What is your job?
  • How did you get to know symfony?
  • Do you use any other PHP framework/CMS?
  • What is the average size of projects that you/your company work on?
  • How do you get trained?

The last question is interesting - it asked the community how many would be interested in getting a Symfony certification. The results were almost broken into equal thirds of "yes", "no" and "somewhat interested. You can see the full results here.

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symfony community survey usage results graph



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