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Michael Dowling:
Guzzle 4.0
March 31, 2014 @ 13:57:08

Michael Dowling has announced the release of Guzzle 4.0.0 on his site today. Guzzle is one of the most widely used, popular HTTP clients in the PHP community today. Its used in both corporate and open source projects as a primary means for making HTTP requests and RESTful web service clients.

Guzzle 4.0 has arrived! The new version of Guzzle is now simpler, faster, more flexible, and more powerful than ever. [...] Guzzle is a PHP HTTP client that makes it easy to work with HTTP/1.1 and takes the pain out of consuming web services.

He includes a quick example of it in use making a request to the GitHub API to fetch user information. He lists out some of the changes made in this release but points to this other post for the full list. He's also tagged other related projects to match this 4.0.0 release including Guzzle Streams and the Log Subscriber.

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guzzle http client restful release v4

Link: http://mtdowling.com/blog/2014/03/29/guzzle4/

PHP Town Hall:
Episode 20 A Nice Friendly Chat About Sculpin, Guzzle and PSR-7
March 07, 2014 @ 09:03:51

The PHP Town Hall podcast has released their latest episode today, Episode 20: A Nice Friendly Chat About Sculpin, Guzzle and PSR-7 with guests Beau Simensen and Michael Dowling.

This show has a history of talking about FIG stuff as it is hard to avoid. The group is working on so much cool stuff and prominent figures of the community are involved. We got two more prominent figures, who also happen to be involved with FIG stuff: Beau Simensen lead developer of Sculpin and Michael Dowling lead developer of the wonderful HTTP library Guzzle, who also works at AWS on their PHP SDK.

They talk about each of the projects mentioned and what's coming up for each. There's also some discussion around the PSR-7 HTTP spec that's been proposed and is in the works. You can listen to this latest show in a few different ways - either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or you can watch the video of the live recording via Google Hangouts.

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phptownhall ep20 podcast beausimensen michaeldowling psr7 http

Link: http://phptownhall.com/blog/2014/03/06/episode-20-a-nice-friendly-chat-about-sculpin-guzzle-and-psr-7/

PHPClasses.org:
Using Composer to Install JavaScript, CSS & Images Under the Web Document Directory
January 07, 2014 @ 12:36:07

On the PHPClasses.org site today there's a new post showing how to install more than just PHP packages with Composer including things like Javascript, CSS and image files.

By default Composer installs all package files under the vendor directory. If you want to install asset files in the Web document root directory, you need to resort to another solution. This Asset Manager package is a plugin that extends Composer to install any package files outside the vendor directory. Additionally, it can also read the user names and passwords from a configuration file, so you do not have to enter them every time Composer retrieves packages from repositories that may require authentication, like PHP Classes and JS Classes.

Using an asset manager plugin for Composer, he shows how to include an "extra" section into your "composer.json" for the other files. There's also an example of how to implement a custom installation action that, in this case, was used to implement the "extras" functionality. The post finishes up with a look at handling authentication in the Composer requests, using the same tool to parse a "config" section with Basic HTTP authentication information.

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composer package install javascript css image assets http authentication

Link: http://www.phpclasses.org/blog/package/8429/post/1-Using-Composer-to-Install-JavaScript-CSS-and-Images-Under-the-Web-Document-Directory.html

BitExpert.de Blog:
Composer, Bower and HTTP Basic Auth
December 27, 2013 @ 11:16:23

Stephan Hochdörfer has shared a handy tip for the Composers users out there that may have to deal with username/password protected repositories as a part of your package install process. In his post he shows how to use a simple "expect" script to automatic the HTTP Basic Auth login.

A couple of months ago when we set-up our own internal Satis repository to host our custom Composer packages. We ran into an "unpleasant" issue with Composer that had this PR as an result. To sum things up: We are using HTTP Basic Auth to password-project our Satis repository. There was no way we could switch to an SSL client certificate to allow Composer to authenticate itself automatically without asking for a password. Asking for the password on a developer`s machine is no big thing, but it since we need an automated Composer run in our Jenkins environment, there was no way to set things up.

As Composer doesn't currently support this functionality, they had to find a way around it. They went with an expect script that is used to work with the prompts and send the username/password information when expected. He also points out that this could be useful for other situations and tools - like a Bower build.

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composer satis username password http basic authorization bower expect

Link: http://blog.bitexpert.de/blog/composer-bower-and-http-basic-auth/

Chris Hartjes:
The Power of the BrowserProxyMob
November 19, 2013 @ 10:49:38

In this new post to his site Chris Hartjes shares a tool he's found to help with automated front-end testing for web applications - BrowserMobProxy

At work I have been involved with an effort to put some automated front-end testing in place. The combination of Behat, Mink running tests using PhantomJS is a good one for this. Open source, easy to configure, handles JavaScript-heavy pages reasonably well. There was just one wrinkle in our plans: our use of local host files. [...] So clearly what was needed [to solve a hosts file switching issue] was a proxy. After doing a little bit of digging around I found a solution: BrowserMobProxy.

He briefly introduces the tool and helps you get it installed (as well as the library you'll need to interface with the proxy). His library hooks into a running PhantomJS instance and the BrowserMobProxy, generates the right hosts file (not included) and continues on with the tests.

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browserproxymob proxy http request phantonjs unittest behat mink

Link: http://www.littlehart.net/atthekeyboard/2013/11/18/the-power-of-the-browserproxymob/

Mikko Koppanen:
Memcached protocol support
November 15, 2013 @ 11:15:38

Mikko Koppanen has posted about some updates he's making to the PECL memcached extension, more specifically around binary protocol support.

There are quite a few things still missing and only binary protocol is supported at the moment, but the code seems to work reasonably well in small-scale testing. I am not sure whether this is useful for anyone, but at least it allows things such as quick prototyping of network servers, exposing sqlite database over memcached protocol etc.

An example of code using this new functionality is included in the post showing how to create both a simple sever with attached "get" and "set" handlers and a client to connect to it and enable the binary protocol.

The code is still work in progress but it's available in github: https://github.com/mkoppanen/php-memcached/tree/feature-server. Note that you need to compile libmemcached with -enable-libmemcachedprotocol and the PECL memcached extension with -enable-memcached-protocol.
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memcached binary support protocol pecl update

Link: http://valokuva.org/memcached-protocol-support/

Rob Allen:
Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X Mavericks
November 04, 2013 @ 09:52:25

For those that have made the switch to OSX Mavericks and are wondering how to get PHP and MySQL into a working state, Rob Allen has posted a quick guide to getting it all set up.

With OS X 10.9 Mavericks, Apple chose to ship PHP 5.4.17. This is how to set it up from a clean install of Mavericks. Note: If you don't want to use the built-in PHP or want to use version 5.5, then these are [other] alternatives: a binary package from Liip, Zend Server and a Homebrew install.

He provides all the commands you'll need to get things up and running including checking file/directory permissions, installing MySQL and using the command line to work with Apache (no more "Web Sharing"). He also includes the configuration changes to be made to the php.ini including how to enable Xdebug. There's lots of other good things included in the guide as well like setting up Composer, PHPUnit and how to compile a few handy extensions.

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osx mavericks mysql install configure apache extension pear pecl phpunit

Link: http://akrabat.com/computing/setting-up-php-mysql-on-os-x-mavericks/

Zend:
Apigility Progress report zf-mvc-auth, packagist, and PHP's built-in web server
November 01, 2013 @ 15:52:11

In a new post to the Apigility forums today Matthew Weier O'Phinney has announced the release of an authentication/authorization component for the recently announced project from Zend. Apigility is a Zend Framework-based tool for easily constructing and managing an API.

We've been working hard on Apigility since ZendCon, and have released some more code into the wild. zf-mvc-auth exists to provide both authentication and authorization for your APIs; in fact, it's a bit of a general-purpose library for ZF2 MVC apps! Right now, we support HTTP basic and digest authentication out of the box, and will be working next on OAuth support. Authorization is done by default via ZendPermissionsAcl, as we discovered a problem with using RBAC: RBAC is deny-by-default, which does not work when you want an open-by-default schema. You may opt-in to deny-by-default, as well as mark individual services as requiring permission by default. Finally, you have the option of denying/allowing per HTTP method of a service as well.

You can find out more details about this functionality in this quick screencast. The zf-apgility module depends on this new zf-mvc-auth module, so it will be included and available by default in your APIs. In that same post Matthew also talks about the listing of the Apigility packages on Packagist service and a note for those wanting to use the built-in HTTP server to run the tool (a PHP version dependency).

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apigility progress zendframework mvc authentication authorization packagist http server

Link: https://groups.google.com/a/zend.com/forum/#!topic/apigility-users/_mOPkxxmGYI

Hasin Hayder:
Installing gearmand, libgearman & pecl gearman for php from source in Debian 6 & 7
October 31, 2013 @ 11:55:51

Hasin Hayder has posted a complete guide to getting Gearman and PHP playing nicely together. The guide gives you a step by step (and command by command) list to follow so you don't have the same pains he did trying to get it working.

I had a pretty rough evening today. No, not because the waiter forgot to add sugar in my tea, but because it was so boring to go through the trial and errors of installing gearman daemon and pecl gearman extension for php.

He walks though the whole process, starting with the failures, that he took getting it installed. Unfortunately it wasn't just as easy as installing a package and using PECL to drop in the extension. There was other software packages that needed to be installed as well and were a bit harder to figure out - libboost, gperf, libevent, uuid-dev and libcloog-ppl-dev. With these installed, the PECL install command was finally able to build and he got the shared module he needed.

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install guide gearman gearmand pecl debian source extension

Link: http://hasin.me/2013/10/30/installing-gearmand-libgearman-and-pecl-gearman-from-source/

Scott Arciszewski:
Using scrypt in PHP-based Websites
October 30, 2013 @ 10:48:18

Scott Arciszewski has posted a new tutorial to his site helping you get scrypt installed as an alternative to some of the other cryptographic functionality that's already supported by PHP (like bcrypt).

Most newbie PHP developers suck at developing user authentication systems. When not storing passwords in plaintext, they just wing it with a simple hash function and hope it's good enough. Instead of md5(), sha1(), or hash(), you should consider using scrypt, pbkdf2, or bcrypt. Today, I'll go through the steps required to start using scrypt in your web applications.

He walks you through the exact steps you'll need to get scrypt installed and working happily with PHP (provided you have root on the machine). Thankfully, it's pretty easy thanks to the scrypt extension provided through PECL. He gives a brief introduction to using the scrypt function and links to an updated version of a scrypt wrapper you can use in your applications.

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scrypt cryptography hashing extension pecl tutorial

Link: https://s.arciszewski.me/blog/2013/10/php-scrypt-setup


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