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SitePoint Web Foundations Blog:
Quick Tip Install Zend Server 7 on an Ubuntu 14.04 Vagrant Box
July 22, 2014 @ 11:14:30

The SitePoint Web Foundations blog has a post from Bruno Skvorc showing how to install Zend Server on Ubuntu 7 set up and configured by Vagrant.

I recently took a look at Zend Server 7, the latest version of the powerful application monitor/manager suite. This quick tip will show you how to get it installed on a Vagrant box so you too can experiment with its features.

The process is made up of four (well, five...one is optional) steps making it pretty easy to try out:

  • Install Prerequisites
  • Clone and Boot
  • Download and Run Installer
  • Fix Log Permissions
  • Deploy an Application (the optional one)

He includes the code updates you'll need to make and some screenshots along the way to be sure you're on the right track.

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zendserver install vagrant ubuntu tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/quick-tip-install-zend-server-7-ubuntu-14-04-vagrant-box/

NetTuts.com:
Running WordPress on OpenShift Part2
July 14, 2014 @ 13:22:52

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series about getting WordPress up and running on a RedHat OpenShift cloud instance. In part one of the series they looked at OpenShift as a whole and created the initial application. This part focuses more on setting up the right environment and getting WordPress installed using their rhc client tool.

In this tutorial, we will dive deeply into OpenShift to understand the custom build and deployment process. We will also learn the command-line tool for logging and troubleshooting when our application is down. [...] We did almost all of those tasks using the web interface which is great and very convenient; however, in addition to the dashboard, OpenShift offers a powerful client tool call rhc client.

They guide you through the installation of the command-line client (rhc) as a Ruby gem and include the results of the "help" command. They include example commands showing how to: ssh into the instance, deploy the application and add more functionality to prepare for the WordPress install. There's also some information about environment variables and creating a custom build process to deploy WordPress correctly.

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openshift tutorial install configure wordpress environment commandline

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/running-wordpress-on-openshift-part2--cms-19947

NetTuts.com:
Running WordPress on OpenShift An Introduction
July 09, 2014 @ 11:07:47

On the NetTuts site today there's a new tutorial that wants to help you get WordPress installed on OpenShift, the platform-as-a-service offering from RedHat that includes full PHP support.

OpenShift is a very good platform for running a WordPress site. PagodaBox and AppFog fair for hosting PHP applications for free; however, PagodaBox is quite slow, and has a hard limit of 10MB of MySQL for free plan. AppFog no longer supports custom domain on their free plan. You can also run PHP on Heroku, but it's a bit on the slow, as well. OpenShift solves all of above problems: It's fast enough, offers a free custom domain, offers large disk space, and a significant amount of MySQL storage.

They start by introducing some of the features OpenShift offers and the basics of what it includes in the free plans. They then walk you through the full process to getting an account set up and creating the environment for the WordPress install:

  • Sign Up for an Account
  • Setup Your Publish Key
  • Get Your WordPress Up (includes code changes if porting an existing installation)
  • Use Your Own Domain
  • Setup phpMyAdmin

They also offer some tips post-installation to help keep things up and running (monitored), enabling remote SSH access and using SFTP to connect to the application if there's a need.

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openshift tutorial install configure wordpress paas

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/running-wordpress-on-openshift-an-introduction--cms-20058

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Install Xdebug with PHPStorm and Vagrant
July 08, 2014 @ 11:32:42

The SitePoint PHP blog has a recent post showing you how to get Xdebug installed and working with PHPStorm through a Vagrant installation. The Xdebug tool provides additional debug information on top of what PHP natively includes in its own error handling.

Xdebug is a PHP extension which allows you to debug and profile your code, view detailed and readable stack traces when errors happen, and much more. For a detailed walkthrough, see Shameer's post. If you're completely unfamiliar with it, you would do well to first install it following the procedures below, and then refer to the post linked above for a breakdown of everything Xdebug can do for you and your apps. In this tutorial, we'll set up Xdebug with PHPStorm for Vagrant hosted PHP apps.

His guide doesn't actually include the installation of Xdebug via Vagrant as the VM he's chosen (Vagrant Homestead) already has it installed. If you need instructions on that, check out this other tutorial. He shows you how to enable it in Homestead and configure the extension to connect back out to your waiting PHPStorm client. He then moves on to the client side and shows how to connect it to the server through PHPStorm's own debugger configuration. He includes a bit of sample code to test the connection (a Laravel route) and checking that the breakpoint handling works as well.

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xdebug phpstorm vagrant homestead install configure

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/install-xdebug-phpstorm-vagrant/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
13 Steps to Get eZ Publish 5.x to Work on Homestead
July 04, 2014 @ 12:28:30

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted today showing how to get eZ Publish 5.x to Work on Laravel Homestead, a virtual machine environment from the creators of the Laravel framework.

This article was initially going to be a quick tip on how to install eZ Publish on Homestead in just a few steps. However, after I saw how much effort it took to get it up and working from scratch on a Vagrant box hosted on Windows, I decided to make it into a full article. I suffered, so you don't have to.

He starts with a bit of an aside about "Vagrant-friendly applications and encourages developers to try to adopt a Vagrant-first approach to getting their systems working across multiple environments. From there he gets into the main part of the tutorial, showing you how to:

  • Install "Homestead Improved"
  • Set up and configure a new site
  • Install dependencies and the latest version of eZ Publish
  • Fix a few issues on installation and "hack the guts" to make some things
  • Change some configuration settings to make the install work correctly
  • Go through the installer to set up the application (and database)
  • Change the web server configuration to remove the need for "index.php"

Screenshots and commands/code needed to make the updates are all included in the post.

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ezpublish laravel homestead tutorial configure install

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/13-steps-get-ez-publish-5-x-homestead/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Install PHP Extensions from Source
June 30, 2014 @ 11:50:22

PHP extensions (from PECL) can be very handy when you need them. Unfortunately, not all distributions come with packages that will install them for you...this is where compiling comes in. On the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc has posted a guide to compiling extensions from source to help you get started.

Sometimes it's hard to know which PHP extensions you'll need before you install PHP. In cases where you need to add extensions later on, you might get lucky and the extension could be in the repository of the OS you're using. [...] What if there's no such thing for other extensions, though? In this tutorial, we'll go through installing some custom extensions on Linux systems (and OS X - the process is nearly identical).

He uses a Laravel Homestead instance as a platform for his example and shows the compilation of the MongoDB for PHP driver. He walks you through the process of booting up the VM and getting the environment/required packages installed. He then shows the process for the installation of two different kinds of PHP extensions: internal and third-party. Finally he shows you how to update your configuration, load in the compiled extension and test it (in this case looking at the phpinfo() to ensure it's loaded).

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install extension source compile tutorial introduction

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/install-php-extensions-source/

Konrad Podgórski:
A better way to work with assets in Symfony 2
June 25, 2014 @ 13:02:11

Konrad Podgórski has a recent post to his site with his suggestion of a better way to deal with assets in Symfony 2-based applications with the help of some other tools, namely NodeJS, Bower and GruntJS.

I will explain how to work with assets in Symfony framework without having to use Assetic Bundle at all. [...] The process will be really fast and easy to understand even if you never used software listed here. However if you experience any problems do not hesitate to ask for help in comments. Post is quite long because it contain a lot of different configs but don't run away just yet. They are ready to copy & paste.

The setup will download the needed dependencies, merge and minify JS/CSS files, copy font files to the right place and deploy it all to an S3 bucket. He first walks you through the installation of the three tools complete with the commands and configurations to get them all integrated. With those installed and working, he then gets into three "scenarios", the steps in the process to build and deploy the completed version:

  • Download latest jQuery, Bootstrap, Font Awesome with Bower and copy the only necessary files to web/assets/*
  • Download dependencies with Bower, copy necessary files to web/assets/*. Then minify javascript and stylesheet files.
  • Download dependencies with Bower, merge them with your custom css and js files, then minify.

Finally, he includes the steps you'll need to follow to get the whole thing deployed out to S3 (or a CDN). In the next part of the series he'll continue the process and look at things like LESS/SASS, watching for changes in assets and how to use RequireJs.

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assets symfony2 grunt bower nodejs tutorial install configure deploy

Link: http://konradpodgorski.com/blog/2014/06/23/better-way-to-work-with-assets-in-symfony-2/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
8 Must Have PHP Quality Assurance Tools
June 25, 2014 @ 09:22:42

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post today with what it calls the eight must- have PHP QA tools to ensure the overall quality of your codebase. These tools cover everything from unit testing out to ensuring code standards are met.

The [QA Tools] site is a simple list of interesting tools that can help you properly test your application, while also analyzing it and producing interesting data for you to look at. This post will be little more than a re-iteration of some of those tools with added information, use cases and advice about them - however, we're open to expanding this list with other QA tools you throw our way that get plenty of votes in the comments below or seem interesting and/or useful enough.

Their list of eight covers a wide range of QA needs:

  • PHPUnit
  • Behat
  • vfsStream
  • PHPLOC
  • PHP Mess Detector
  • PHP CodeSniffer
  • Dead Code Detector
  • Copy Paste Detector

For each there's a brief description and some of the commands you'll need to get it installed. Configuring them for your environment is a bit out of the scope of the article, though, so you'll have to pick that up on your own.

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list eight qualityassurance tools install summary

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/8-must-have-php-quality-assurance-tools/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Help Develop PHP 5.6 RC1 on Homestead
June 23, 2014 @ 11:08:01

In this new post from the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc puts out a "call to action" for the PHP developers out there to help develop and test out PHP 5.6RC1 (the current 5.6 release candidate) with the Laravel Homestead virtual machine.

Last week we talked about Laravel Homestead, a prepared local development environment for PHP built on Vagrant by Taylor Otwell, meant to serve as a common starting point for all Laravel (and possibly other PHP) projects. [...] A week before that, we talked about the end of beta for 5.6, and the beginning of the RC program. [...] In this post, we'll have a quick look at how we can install it over the regular PHP in Laravel Homestead and report the build feedback back to the QA site.

He refers to the other article for installation instructions and quickly gets into the steps needed to download and install the RC1 version. There's a few dependencies to install before you compile, but with a few commands it should be off and running quickly. Screenshots are provided to show you the output each step of the way too. If all goes well, the output of a "php -v" command line call will show the successful build of PHP 5.6.0RC1.

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homestead releasecandidate testing compile install tutorial laravel

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/help-develop-php-5-6-rc1-homestead/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
6 Reasons to Move to Laravel Homestead
June 20, 2014 @ 10:14:10

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post from editor Bruno Skvorc sharing six reasons why he thinks you should move your Laravel-based application over to using the Homestead pre-build Vagrant box.

Laravel Homestead is, in a nutshell: "an official, pre-packaged Vagrant "box" that provides you a wonderful development environment without requiring you to install PHP, a web server, and any other server software on your local machine." In other words, it automatically does what we've done before manually through Vagrant and PuPHPet in articles like these. So what makes it different from your run-of-the-mill Vaprobash/Vagrant/PuPHPet setup? Let's see.

He quickly covers the six points, each with a paragraph or two of explanation:

  • It Works
  • It's Otwell Approved
  • It's Fast to Set Up
  • Ports
  • Best Practices and Common Ground
  • Easy to add sites

There's also a bit of a tutorial aspect here, showing you (via screenshots and configuration examples) how to get some of these points up and running.

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laravel homestead vagrant tutorial install virtualmachine

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/6-reasons-move-laravel-homestead/


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