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Laravel News:
Getting Started with Laravel Model Events
Mar 16, 2018 @ 09:47:09

The Laravel News site has a tutorial posted that introduces you to model events in Eloquent models and how to use them effectively in your code.

Laravel Model events allow you to tap into various points in a model’s lifecycle, and can even prevent a save or delete from happening. The Laravel model events documentation outlines how you can hook into these events with event classes, but this article aims to build upon and fill in a few additional details on setting up events and listeners.

The article starts with an overview of the different types of events available on the models and a brief summary of when each are fired. It then walks you through the process of registering events and where to configure the event-to-handler relationship. The artisan make:event command can then generate the skeleton code for you. In this class you can then add the handler method and then configure it in the providers. Finally it shows an example of how to test the event, stopping the save event and using observers to group the event handling.

tagged: laravel eloquent model event tutorial introduction

Link: https://laravel-news.com/laravel-model-events-getting-started

Yappa Blog:
(En)queue Symfony console commands
Mar 15, 2018 @ 12:13:06

The Yappa.be blog has a tutorial posted sharing the method they used to implement queued and scheduled execution of Symfony commands. This is made possible by the Enqueue package.

At Yappa, we have always used Johannes' JMSJobQueueBundle to run and schedule Symfony console commands for background jobs.

However, we've stumbled upon a much more elegant solution called Enqueue. [...] It's packed with features, supports major brokers such as RabbitMQ, Kafka, Amazon SQS, Google PubSub, Redis etc. and has a bundle ready to be used with Symfony.

[...] One downside is that the Enqueue Symfony bundle doesn't provide an out of the box solution to queue Symfony console commands and there's no 100% straight forward way to implement this. In this post I'll cover the basics in setting up the Enqueue Symfony bundle so we can easily queue Symfony console commands!

The tutorial then walks you through the installation of the Symfony bundle, adding it to the list of installed bundles and configuring it with basic parameters and queue connection details. Next they've included the code to create the processor used when a command is pushed to the queue. To handle the other side (execution of the command when the queue is handled) they create a "QueuedCommand" value object and a command handler class. With this structure in place they show the addition of test commands to the queue and the result when the queue is consumed.

tagged: symfony console command queue package handler tutorial

Link: http://tech.yappa.be/enqueue-symfony-console-commands

Christoph Rumpel:
Content Security Policy 101
Mar 15, 2018 @ 09:52:43

In a new post to his site Christoph Rumpel shares an introduction to the use of Content Security policies to prevent client-side security issues in your applications. While his examples are more Laravel-specific, the concepts can be applied to just about any framework or home-grown solution.

As more and more services get digital these days, security has become a significant aspect of every application. Especially when it comes to third-party code, it is tough to guarantee safety. But in general, XSS and Code Injection is a big problem these days. Content Security Policy provides another layer of security that helps to detect and protect different attacks. Today, I will introduce this concept and its main features, as well as show real-world examples.

He starts with a general look at web application security vulnerabilities and, more specifically, cross-site scripting issues. These are the ones that a Content Security Policy (CSP) can help prevent. He then covers the basics of the CSP header and gets into the implementation. In his example he sets up the addition of the CSP header as a middleware so that it's included on every request. With the default header all resources are blocked so he walks through the process of restoring access to the scripts, fonts and styles his blog needs to work correctly.

With the basics covered he then gets into a few more advanced features of CSP policies such as nonces for resource identification, iframe handling and the submission of forms. The post ends with a recommendation of the Laravel CSP package for use in Laravel applications. If you're looking for something more framework agnostic you might want to look into ParagonIE's CSP Builder library.

tagged: contentsecuritypolicy csp beginner tutorial laravel middleware framework

Link: https://christoph-rumpel.com/2018/03/content-security-policy-101

Marc Baker:
Discharging Static #1
Mar 14, 2018 @ 14:49:47

On his blog Marc Baker about static calls and the trouble they bring in your applications. It's a continuation of ideas that Kore Nordmann shared previously on his site.

It’s been seven years since Kore Nordmann first published “static considered harmful” on his blog, explaining the problems with using static method calls in classes, and the difficulties that they cause when trying to test that class. Seven years on, and those difficulties are still the same, and there is still new code being written using static calls despite that knowledge; but it’s often a more severe problem in legacy code with little or no unit tests.a

So why exactly are static calls so bad? If you’ve read Kore’s article, then you probably have a good idea already; but what that article doesn’t cover is approaches that we can use to make the code testable.

He covers the main issue static methods have when it comes to testing: they introduce coupling by hard-coding a dependency into your code. He talks about the static testing functionality that various PHP testing tools provided: PHPUnit, Phake and Mockery. He then focuses on a newer tool that he's discovered to help make the testing simpler: AspectMock. He gives an example of it in use and some examples of tests using anonymous classes to make it easier to create tests on the fly.

tagged: static testing phpunit example harmful tutorial aspectmock

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2018/03/13/discharging-static-1/

Laravel News:
Testing Vue components with Laravel Dusk
Mar 14, 2018 @ 13:09:52

On the Laravel News site there's a new post showing how you can test Vue.js applications with Laravel Dusk, a testing tool created by the Laravel project to make it easier to create integration tests that are run with a ChromeDriver.

Adding tests to a project is always beneficial for different aspects, but choosing the right strategy could be a struggle for many developers.

The problem multiplies itself when you are using different tools or frameworks, and although “having as many tests as you can” sounds like a good idea, at least in theory, in practice this can be very different. The following is an interesting article from the Twitter team about their thoughts on Feature Testing.

Taylor Otwell shared Twitter’s article on his Bi-Weekly Laravel Tips newsletter, subscribe if you haven’t done yet. Let’s build a simple to-do list using Vue.js and Laravel to illustrate how to add Browser testing using Laravel dusk.

They starts with the controller code to create "tasks" functionality for read/write/update/delete that includes request validation, model binding and JSON responses. It then includes the code to create the first "task" tests for each of the CRUD operations. With those basics in place, the tutorial then gets into the Vue.js side, showing how to test a simple TasksComponent.vue file and its functionality.

tagged: laravel dusk testing crud task vuejs tutorial

Link: https://laravel-news.com/testing-vue-components-with-laravel-dusk

Andrew Embler:
Automated Dependency Injection Using Containers
Mar 13, 2018 @ 11:58:42

In a previous post to his site Andrew Embler provided a "concrete guide to dependency injection", a method to help make code easier to test and more flexible/maintainable. In this latest post he continues the series and moves to the next topic: dependency injection containers.

I recently posted about dependency injection, a guide that I hope was easy to read and understand. It's a topic that's confusing, due in no small part to its name. As I mention there, the same term defines the simple process of externally providing instance variables to a class as it does to the Container object's magical auto-instantiation of object (which also "injects dependencies.")

I'd like to talk a bit more about that. Now that we understand the term "Dependency Injection" (which is simply providing classes to classes through a constructor or a setter), let's talk about how we might make this a little less onerous.

He starts with an example from the concrete5 project where a class would require three object instances each time it would be created. Fortunately the software includes a make command that does some of this work for you. It makes use of a dependency injection container behind the scenes to get the instances it needs. He then covers cascading dependencies, some special logic for class creation and how to "get fancy with it" by defining custom logic when an instance is created.

tagged: dependency injection container concrete5 instance tutorial

Link: http://andrewembler.com/2018/03/automated-dependency-injection-using-containers

Sebastian De Deyne:
Server side rendering JavaScript from PHP
Mar 13, 2018 @ 10:21:24

Sebastian De Deyne has a tutorial posted to his site showing you how to use two packages to render Javascript on the server side via PHP.

Server side rendering is a hot topic when it comes to client side applications. Unfortunately, it's not an easy thing to do, especially if you're not building things in a Node.js environment.

I published two libraries to enable server side rendering JavaScript from PHP: spatie/server-side-rendering and spatie/laravel-server-side-rendering for Laravel apps.

Let's review some server side rendering concepts, benefits and tradeoffs, and build a server renderer in PHP from first principles.

The tutorial starts with a look at what "server-side rendering" means in this case, how it works with the browser and some of the benefits. It then talks about the rendering process and some of the tradeoffs between it and just using Javascript on the frontend. From there the post gets to the examples of the actual rendering process. If creates a simple Vue.js application that outputs a "Hello, world!" template. It then includes the code to use the packages (that, in turn, use the V8JS package) to render the Javascript and output the result.

tagged: serverside render javascript tutorial package spatie v8js

Link: https://sebastiandedeyne.com/posts/2018/server-side-rendering-javascript-from-php

Sergey Zhuk:
Amp Promises: Using Router With ReactPHP Http Component
Mar 13, 2018 @ 09:25:37

Sergey Zhuk has a post on his site that covers using a Router with a ReactPHP component. This router lets you more easily direct the HTTP requests coming into the application to the correct piece of functionality.

Router defines the way your application responds to a client request to a specific endpoint which is defined by URI (or path) and a specific HTTP request method (GET, POST, etc.). With ReactPHP Http component we can create an asynchronous web server. But out of the box the component doesn’t provide any routing, so you should use third-party libraries in case you want to create a web-server with a routing system.

He starts with an example of manual routing, showing the code for a basic server and adding in handlers based on the path+HTTP verb to respond with different content. He expands this basic example out to a more "real world" situation of the usual CRUD handling for "tasks". The post then shows how to change things up and use the FastRoute routing package to remove the manual route definitions from the server and define them in the router instead. It can then dispatch these to the correct location more easily. The post finishes up showing an additional feature: how to use wildcards in these URL definitions.

tagged: reactphp server http router fastroute tutorial series

Link: http://sergeyzhuk.me/2018/03/13/using-router-with-reactphp-http/

Tomas Votruba:
Why is Collector Pattern so Awesome
Mar 12, 2018 @ 11:53:34

In a new post to his site Tomas Votruba shares some of his thoughts about why he thinks the Collector pattern is so awesome. The Collector pattern is one of many design patterns that can be used to create well-structured applications.

I already wrote about Collector pattern as one we can learn from Symfony or Laravel. But they're so useful and underused I have need to write a more about them.

Yesterday I worked on Rector and needed an entry point to add one or more Rectors by user.

He then goes through the process he followed during the refactor and some of the questions he asked:

  • Add a Provider?
  • Use Expression Language?
  • Does Collector Scale?
  • Add Tagging?

He finishes the post with one last thought about git history and how it should "tell the story" of the refactoring.

tagged: collector pattern refactor rector tutorial

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2018/03/08/why-is-collector-pattern-so-awesome/

Laravel News:
User Defined Schedules in Laravel
Mar 09, 2018 @ 11:43:31

On the Laravel News site there's a new post looking at the use of user-defined schedules and some of the "hidden" features the Laravel framework provides to allow for even more customization.

Recently Adam Wathan and Taylor Otwell have used Basecamp to track what they are doing every day–a tech diary. Notably, they are using the check-in feature which allows you to schedule questions to be sent to members about almost anything. Taylor and Adam are using it for “What did you work on today?”

It’s not that it’s the same time of day or even that it’s only weekdays which peaked my curiosity but the fact every check-in has a custom schedule defined by a user. In Laravel, we can quickly schedule a job to run every weekday at 4 pm, and we can use a custom timezone. But out of the box, we cannot set a different schedule for every individual check-in. We would have to store a cron expression and manually check every minute if it’s due.

After some "source code diving" the author figured out that the Schedulable trait allows you to define a more customized version of a schedule to fit your needs, making it simple to implement in any class or model. Code examples of these changes are included in the post as well as some next steps to have it implemented more widely either in the Laravel core or a package.

tagged: laravel schedule custom trait tutorial example

Link: https://laravel-news.com/user-defined-schedules-in-laravel