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Qandidate.com Blog:
Asynchronous fault tolerant programming with PHP
August 12, 2014 @ 12:17:20

On the Qandidate.com blog there's a new post looking at fault tolerant programming in PHP, a follow up to their previous post introducing the topic and creating a "circuit breaker" to prevent major issues when a problem pops up.

Now we will show you a running demo of the application where the circuit breaker library Phystrix is combined with asynchronous programming. The advantage of this approach is that it allows the querying of multiple backend services asynchronously. A timeout can be set for each of the calls and the circuit breaker will deal with failing services.

A screencast included in the post shows a script in action and how it reacts when the various services it needs fail. They've posted the code for the demo can be found over on GitHub and full instructions to run it are included in the post. Also included is some of the output from the test and a peek inside the logs showing where things were broken and if they were able to recover.

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asynchronous fault tolerant programming demo github screencast

Link: http://labs.qandidate.com/blog/2014/08/11/asynchronous-fault-tolerant-programming-in-php/

Joshua Thijssen:
Internal PHP function usage revisited
August 06, 2014 @ 11:53:34

Joshua Thjissen has revisited some of his PHP internal function statistics, an update from this previous post with some results showing the most (and least) used internal PHP functions in several large projects from GitHub.

A lot of people are asking about functions like isset, empty, print, echo etc, as they are not present in the current result list. The thing is, is that these are not really functions, but language constructs. This means that PHP treats them a bit different than normal functions, and this results sometimes in seemingly "strange" behaviour when trying to use them like regular functions.

He's updated his results, though, to reflect the usage of these "functions" and shared the numbers. Not surprisingly, these constructs show up pretty highly in the new "top 22" list he's produced. With the inclusion of the constructs, the number one item on the list is now "isset" by a very large margin. The full results can be found in this gist.

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internal function usage statistics github revisit construct language

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2014/08/05/internal-php-function-usage-revisited/

Joshua Thijssen:
Internal PHP function usage
July 28, 2014 @ 10:05:39

Curious about the usage of the various "internal" (built-in, not user defined) functions in use is a wide range of PHP applications, Joshua Thijssen did some research on GitHub and has shared the results on his site today.

How many internal PHP functions (things like count(), strpos(), array_merge() etc), does PHP have? Depending on which version you use, and how many extensions you have loaded, somewhere between 1000 and 2000 would be a good guess. But how many of these internal functions are you REALLY using?

He created a custom script to fetch the results of a custom query (one that found repos with over fifty stars), grabbed the source and parsed the results looking for these internal functions. He shares the results of his parsing from 967 repos in the remainder of the post, including: the top ten most called, some interesting facts found in the results and some of the "bad" ones in wide use (like "exec" and "mysql_connect").

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internal function usage statistics github parse query

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2014/07/25/internal-php-function-usage/

Hari KT:
Aura Framework V2 The Missing Manual
July 16, 2014 @ 10:14:52

Hari KT has a new post to his site today about a book he's been working around around the Aura framework that provides the missing manual for v2 of the project. He's publishing it as a book over on Leanpub too, so it's easy to grab...and for free too.

Aura has an awesome collection of libraries for different purpose. [...] If you are new to aura, there is probably something you may want to figure out yourself. Some of the components have version 1 and version 2 releases. There is a question of which branch corresponds to which version. [...] But people new to aura may be having hard time to find the specific documentation or may be stuck sometime. [...] I was talking with Paul M Jones regarding the documentation lately, and he too shared some concerns. Talking with him gave me some inspiration to start the missing manual for the aura framework.

The goal of the book it to provide a good resource for people to learn about the framework/components and their use and to help promote Aura. The book is available for free either on Github or Leanpub (or, to help support Hari and the project consider purchasing a copy).

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aura framework component missing manual leanpub github

Link: http://harikt.com/blog/2014/07/15/aura-framework-v2-the-missing-manual/

HHVM Blog:
Faster GitHub Commits
July 09, 2014 @ 09:23:19

On the Facebook HHVM blog they talk about an improvement they've made to the project allowing for faster GitHub commits on the project. They've reworked things to move away from a manual process on the popular project and automate as much as possible.

Initially, the entire process was manual. We would curl the pull request and pipe it to git am, then manually prepare the diff for review internally. After it was accepted, we would manually prepare the internal commit to be usable externally by GitHub, then manually build and test the new code, and finally git push. Great scripts by ptarjan and sgolemon to help get and prepare pull requests for review and then prepare the commits for GitHub have alleviated some of this manual process. However, in the end, someone still had to manually build, test and then push the code to the world.

Another feature of this effort is a new cron job (facebook-github-bot) that pushes any internal (approved) HHVM code automatically without having to wait for the manual intervention. It syncs all code since the last push, runs all tests and, assuming all went well, pushes it out to GitHub.

we believe that getting your code into the master branch quickly will hopefully help show how much we appreciate your contributions. Now, if there was only a way we could get your pull requests reviewed faster and more openly…. Hmmm…
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github commit release bot continuous integration

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/5399/faster-github-commits

Semaphoreapp.com:
Continuous Integration & Deployment of PHP applications from GitHub to Heroku
June 18, 2014 @ 11:35:21

The Semaphore site (a testing and deployment service) has posted a tutorial showing how to set up a continuous integration/deployment using their service, GitHub and Heroku for a PHP application.

The practice of continuous delivery is steadily gaining ground in the PHP community. [...] With PHP support being recently launched on both Semaphore and Heroku, you can set up a continuous delivery pipeline for your web application in a matter of minutes. In this post I will show you how to set up continuous integration and deployment for a simple Laravel web application through Semaphore. You can find the application's source code on GitHub.

They walk you through the creation of the Heroku application, grabbing the API key and connecting the Semaphore account with GitHub. Once linked, you can select the repository and any build commands needed for deployment. Finally, they show how to configure the actual continuous version of the deployment and have it release after each successful build.

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semaphore continuous deployment integration github heroku tutorial

Link: https://semaphoreapp.com/blog/2014/06/17/continuous-integration-deployment-php-with-github-semaphore-heroku.html

HHVM Blog:
HHVM 3.1.0
May 30, 2014 @ 11:56:54

On the HHVM blog today they've announce the release of the latest version of the popular project, version 3.1.0. This version fixes a few issues (including a segfault) and crossed into their semi-annual "lockdown" to work directly on the project.

If you remember last time we focused on framework unit tests, performance, and growing beards. This time, our frameworks were in good shape thanks to Fred and our Open Academy students, but our github story was not as pretty. At the start of lockdown we had 60 pull requests and nearly 450 issues. So our focus this time was github health and of course as always, perf.

In the end they closed out 251GitHub issues and made things 16% more efficient in the process. They list out some of the updates in this release including:

You can grab this latest release from the pre-build packages page on the GitHub project account.

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hiphop vm hhvm release version github issues

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/5195/hhvm-3-1-0

HHVM Blog:
Hack Community Roundup
May 19, 2014 @ 12:45:12

For those interested in what's going on in the world of Hack (the Facebook-created language based on PHP) check out this "community roundup" with information about and links to some of the latest happenings.

In the weeks since the Hack open source launch and the Hack developer day, there has been a lot of information, code, blog posts, etc coming from our nascent community. To us on the team, it's been incredible and encouraging to see the community reception to Hack. Here are some of the highlights of the things we've seen come out of our community. (And we almost certainly haven't seen everything, so please let us know in the comments what we've missed!

They share several related GitHub projects (including the Hack/HHVM support on Heroku), a few presentations about installation and experience with the tools and a few blog posts wrapping up their Hack dev day and an article from FastCompany about Hack and its motivation

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hhvm hack roundup github project blog presentations

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/4811/hack-community-roundup

New Relic Blog:
25 PHP Developers to Follow Online
May 14, 2014 @ 09:14:55

On the New Relic blog today there's a new list posted of the 25 PHP developers they suggest you follow, both on Twitter and via their code contributions.

Building PHP frameworks is hard, but following these PHP source and framework committers on Twitter is easy. You'll learn lots of interesting bits about what's happening in their respective communities, and if you want to see where the PHP and PHP framework communities are going next, just watch your feed for these folks.

Included in their list are PHP notables like:

Check out the full post for the rest of the list!

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developers follow opinion twitter github source framework community

Link: http://blog.newrelic.com/2014/05/02/25-php-developers-follow-online/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PHP and Continuous Integration with Travis CI
May 13, 2014 @ 11:18:55

If you've ever wanted to get into continuous testing and validation of your code but didn't want the hassle of having to set up a new instance/server just to do it, you're in luck. Travis-CI does exactly that and is a hosted platform anyone can use. Today on the SitePoint blog Michael Calkins wants to help you get started using Travis-CI for your PHP-based applications.

Continuous integration (CI) allows a team to commit their work quickly, which means there will be multiple commits to a repository daily. Every time there is a commit it is verified by an automated build (including test) to alert you of any build or test errors immediately. Once the process of integrating and verifying your work into the master becomes automatic you are able to develop cohesive software rapidly.

He starts by introducing Travis -CI and what it has to offer developers. He shows you how to get started, linking it with Github, and how to sync the repositories you want tested in the configuration. He talks about the ".travis.yml" configuration file, provides an example and how to start up a new build. There's also a mention of the build status images you can add to your repository to show the current build status. The rest of the article talks about other topics like pull request testing, a branch summary and how to view the build history.

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continuous integration travisci introduction github tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/php-continuous-integration-travis-ci/


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