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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Sculpin Extended: Customizing Your Static Site Blog
Aug 19, 2016 @ 12:22:56

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted helping those Sculpin users out there get the most from their site with some helpful customization tips. Sculpin is a PHP-based static site generation tool that converts Mardon files and Twig templates into HTML documents ready for use.

If you’re a PHP developer and currently running a blog with a static site generator such as Octopress or Jekyll, wouldn’t it be great if you could use your primary language for it? Yes, it’s healthy for us developers to use more than one language, but let’s be honest – we often want to add some functionality to our blogs, but it’s difficult to accomplish in unfamiliar syntax. In this article, we’ll set up Sculpin, a static site generator for PHP. Just like any other static site generator, it uses markdown files and HTML templates to generate your blog, so the transition should be easy.

The tutorial starts by helping you get Sculpin installed (as a phar executable) and move it to where it's globally accessible. With that installed the article then helps you make a simple blog, customize some of the basic settings and start in on a new blog post. With that in place it then gets into the customization, adding in:

  • syntax highlighting
  • Disqus commenting
  • blog archive links

The post finishes up showing you how to deploy the resulting blog into a GitHub pages repository and pushing them out for public consumption.

tagged: sculpin extended tutorial static site github pages syntaxhighligh disquis archive

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/sculpin-extended-customizing-your-static-site-blog/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Nitpicking over Code Standards with Nitpick CI
Jun 03, 2016 @ 13:19:07

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted from Bruno Skvorc showing you how to use Nitpick CI to "nitpick" over coding standards and rules in your PHP code.

There are many ways to make sure your code respects a given code standard – we’ve covered several before. But enforcing a standard team-wide and making sure everyone knows about mistakes before they’re applied to the project isn’t something that’s very easy to do. Travis and Jenkins can both be configured to do these checks, but aren’t as easygoing about it as the solution we’re about to look at: Nitpick CI.

He starts by getting a sample project bootstrapped and pushes it up to GitHub so the Nitpick service can access it. He then switches over to the Nitpick side and shows the setup of an account and a new project pointing to the newly created repo. He then includes the process and results of two kinds of pushes: non-code (README update) and both a valid/invalid code update. He shows examples of the comments the Nitpick service makes directly on the code and a patch to fix the issues.

tagged: nitpickci coding standards github tutorial service

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/nitpicking-over-code-standards-with-nitpick-ci/

Zend Framework Blog:
Announcement: ZF repository renamed!
May 05, 2016 @ 09:57:16

The Zend Framework blog has a post announcing the name change of the main Zend Framework repository on GitHub:

Per the GitHub documentation on renames, existing links will be automatically redirected, and will persist as long as we do not create a new repository with the name "zf2". Redirects occur for: issues, wikis, stars, followers and git operations.

The post also includes the instructions on how to update your current "remotes" in your git checkout (so you don't have to re-clone). It also mentions the change and how it relates to Composer - hint: nothing at all because of how Composer works.

tagged: zendframework2 repository rename zendframework announcement github

Link: http://framework.zend.com/blog/2016-05-03-zf-repo-rename.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Issues, Tags, and Closures (oh my)
Apr 14, 2016 @ 10:37:52

On the Zend Framework blog there's an update from Gary Hockin about some GitHub project-level changes that will be happening soon. He'll be doing some housekeeping on the current list of open issues in the main zf2 repository.

I want to make you aware of some upcoming changes to the issues that are currently logged in GitHub. We currently have 426 open issues that are logged against the (now) meta zf2 repository. The vast majority of these are now in the wrong place, as we've split our once monolithic single repository into the many single component repositories. These issues should be moved from the zf2 repository to the correct component that the issue relates to.

He's closed some issues in preparation and tagged others with a "To Be Closed" tag for later handling. By early May all issues tagged "To Be Closed" will be finished out and/or moved to the correct locations. This will leave the project with around 100 issues to manage and to move to the right locations.

tagged: zendframework2 github repository issues closing tagged

Link: http://framework.zend.com/blog/2016-04-11-issue-closures.html

Laravel News:
Laravel Cheat Sheet
Apr 07, 2016 @ 11:20:09

As is mentioned in this new post to the Laravel News site, there's a handy Laravel Cheat Sheet that's been published to help keep relevant Laravel information at your fingertips.

The Laravel Cheat Sheet is a new project from the EST Group that shows you many of the Laravel features from a filterable web app. For those that have used Laravel for a few years, you may notice the similarities to Jesse O’Briens.

Jesse hasn’t had time to keep his version up to date which left an opening for this new one. However, I’m disappointed in the similarities. Even though both are open source it just feels odd to me that this one looks so much like Jesse’s.

You can view the project directly (via GitHub pages) or grab the source if you'd like to check it out.

tagged: laravel cheatsheet project github information quick reference

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/04/laravel-cheat-sheet/

Cal Evans:
Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television…But Can Apparently Say In Code
Apr 01, 2016 @ 11:49:39

In a lighthearted post for this April Fool's Cal Evans has released some interesting research ("research" here is "searching on GitHub") for the statistics behind the use of profanity in code. (As you'd expect, there's profanity in the post, so don't read if you're offended by that).

The late great George Carlin had many awesome comedy skits. One of them – possibly his most famous – is “Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television” from the comedy album “Class Clown”. In it he gives his list of seven words that – at the time – were inappropriate for over the air broadcast in the United States.

I thought it would be fun – if for no other reason than clickbait – to run the 7 dirty words against Github to see who is using what, and where. I took screenshots so that you can see each word and which languages use it the most. I also list PHP’s rating for each word out of the top 10 languages.

While I won't go into the list of actual words in this post, it's interesting to see which languages come out on top for certain words. In most cases PHP came in somewhere in the middle with a few exceptions either way.

tagged: profanity words code results search github ranking

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2016/04/01/seven-words-you-can-never-say-on-television-but-can-apparently-say-in-code/

Community News:
Laravel Internals Discussion Moves to Github
Mar 15, 2016 @ 10:18:47

The Laravel project has traditionally held discussions about the internals of the framework in an IRC channel on the Freenode.net network. The decision was made recently, however, to move the development over to GitHub (most likely to make it more accessible).

There's already several issues that have been posted on the Issues list in the GitHub repository including things around:

  • improving typecasting
  • decoupling Carbon (the date handling library)
  • a fluent interface for validation
  • enhancing the localization functionality

You can give feedback or start your own discussions by adding an issue to the list or just sharing your thoughts on current topics.

tagged: laravel community issues list internals github irc channel

Link: https://github.com/laravel/internals/issues

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Automating GitHub Pages Builds with MkDocs
Feb 01, 2016 @ 10:49:57

In this new post to his site Matthew Weier O'Phinney details the process they (Zend) used to create the documentation for the latest release of their Expressive PSR-7 compatible framework (now in v1.0).

One of the final tasks in prepping for the Expressive 1.0 release was setting up the documentation site. We'd decided to use GitHub Pages for this, and we wanted to automate builds so that as we push to the master branch, documentation is deployed.

The process turned out both simple and bewilderingly difficult. This post is intended to help others in the same situation.

While they decided on MkDocs for the actual document generation (written in Python) Matthew how he integrated it with the builds they'd already created for the Expressive framework. He talks about reusability for the process, eventually using it again on the Zend Framework side. He also shows the full process for creating the resulting documentation and pushing it over to GitHub Pages including the setup of the credentials, which events should trigger the build and handling environment variables and software dependencies. It's a great post with plenty of details on each step of the process - I'd highly recommend it if you're looking into building these sorts of documents for your project.

tagged: github pages build travisci mkdocs python tutorial process

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2016-01-29-automating-gh-pages.html

Rob Allen:
The beginner's guide to contributing to a GitHub project
Sep 24, 2015 @ 12:08:10

If you've ever wanted to contribute to an open source project but didn't have any idea where to begin, Rob Allen has a few suggestions to help you get started. His guide is a bit more on the technical level than others that talk more about finding a project or community to be a part of, though.

This is a guide to contributing to an open source project that uses GitHub. It's mostly based on how I've seen Zend Framework, Slim Framework and joind.in operate. However, this is a general guide so check your project's README for specifics.

He walks you through a four step process to getting ready to contribute and make that first submission to the project of your choice:

  • Set up a working copy on your computer
  • Do some work
  • Create the PR (Pull Request)
  • Review by the maintainers

Naturally, some of this depends on the process that the project follows to take in new submissions, either from an issues list or just random buxfixes. It's a pretty standard GitHub-centric guide to follow though. He also recommends reading this article from Lorna Mitchell about code reviews and what the maintainers of most open source projects will look for in submissions.

tagged: beginner guide opensource github contribute project

Link: http://akrabat.com/the-beginners-guide-to-contributing-to-a-github-project/

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
Github auth token on TravisCI
Sep 24, 2015 @ 11:42:01

In a post to his site Cees-Jan Kiewiet shows you how to get an authentication token from GitHub to use in your testing on the Travis-CI continuous integration service.

The composer cache greatly speeds up your composer part of the build by only going to Github for new downloads. When combined with test lowest, current, and highest possible on Travis you only reach out to Github for new versions. Most likely to happen during the highest possible set of builds, but also when you've updated composer.*. This normally isn't an issue unless you hit Github's rate limit. And since composer is running on a 'public' travis box with a 'public' IP address that has been use by many builds before it there is a very very high chance it already hit the 60 requests per hour limit.

[...] To counter this problem we have to set a Github authentication token as environment variable in Travis for each project. And update .travis.yml so the token is used by composer.

He walks you through the steps you'll need to get a token of your very own:

  • Go to the Settings section on your GitHub account
  • Generate a new Personal Access Token
  • Add the token to the Travis-CI account you're using for your builds
  • Update your .travis.yml configuration with the token information

Each step includes either a screenshot of where to go or the configuration example you'll need to use (like in the yml file).

tagged: github authentication token travisci ratelimit

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/09/github-auth-token-on-travis/