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Delicious Brains:
Announcing serializededitor.com: A Visual Editor for PHP Serialized Data
Jun 28, 2017 @ 09:22:23

On the Delicious Brains site there's a new post from Gilbert Pellegram announcing serializededitor.com, an editor specifically designed to help visually edit serialized PHP data.

I recently built a command line daemon in PHP to emulate AWS SQSD for the purposes of testing in Mergebot. As it turns out, one of the benefits of building a large, complex product like Mergebot is that there are pieces of the system that we need to build for the project that might be of use to other developers.

Today, we’re launching that system piece, a free online visual editor for PHP serialized data as serializededitor.com.

In this article, I’ll explain how and why we built this “side” project and how I overcame some of the challenges I faced when building this project.

He starts off with the problem they were trying to solve when creating the editor, mostly centered around determining the differences between two pieces of serialized data. They found something similar to what they were wanting but it didn't provide the "easy editiing" functionality they wanted. He then goes through some of the issues they bumped up against along the way: working with the data and PHP's unserialize, the creation of their own parser, the work to create the Vue.js frontend and re-serializing the data once complete.

They've also open sourced the project over on GitHub so you can clone it locally and contribute back.

tagged: serialized data editor project introduction github vuejs

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/announcing-serializededitor-com-visual-editor-php-serialized-data/

Freek Van der Herten:
Building a realtime dashboard powered by Laravel and Vue (2017 edition)
Jun 27, 2017 @ 09:53:33

Freek van der Herten has a recent post to his site sharing a project that was created by the team at Spatie to show real-time information on a large display there in the office. In his post he details how this system was created using Laravel for the backend and Vue.js for the frontend.

At Spatie we have a tv screen against the wall that displays a dashboard. This dashboard displays the tasks our team should be working on, important events in the near future, which music is playing at our office, and so on.

We’ve opensourced our dashboard, so you can view the entire source code on GitHub. It is built with Laravel 5.4 and Vue.

He goes through some of the history behind the project and how it was designed to replace some initial efforts with Dashing. He covers the basic functionality of the system with a high level overview and what kind of information it's displaying. From there he gets into more of the technical details of the dashboard including the grid setup, server-side code, client side Vue.js functionality and packages involved.

tagged: dashboard laravel vuejs tutorial github opensource display

Link: https://murze.be/2017/06/building-realtime-dashboard-powered-laravel-vue-2017-edition/

Laravel News:
Laravel Forge PHP SDK
Apr 05, 2017 @ 10:56:24

On the Laravel News site there's an announcement about the release of an SDK for the Forge API to make it easier to use the Laravel Forge API to manage your sites and servers.

Laravel Forge announced it’s first official API back in February and we have seen a lot of interesting uses like the F-Bar Mac app. Today, Mohamed Said released a PHP SDK for the API that covers all the features.

The post includes an example of using the SDK to create a new server on your Forge account, providing settings like size, name, region and provider. The post also lists out some of the other methods available in the SDK including:

  • revokeAccess
  • rebootMysql
  • installBlackfire
  • installPapertrail

You can find out more about this SDK on its GitHub repository.

tagged: laravel forge sdk github release functionality server management

Link: https://laravel-news.com/laravel-forge-php-sdk

Scotch.io:
Laravel Social Authentication with Socialite
Nov 17, 2016 @ 12:17:41

The Scotch.io site has posted a tutorial for the Laravel users out there showing you how to use the Socalite package in your application to make authentication handling with external services simpler.

Laravel introduced a built in Authentication module in version 5.2. To set this up, you just have to run php artisan make:auth and everything is generated for you, from the views to the controllers and the routes.

[...] And that is a great thing. However, this command will only make you a traditional login. In most sites nowadays when signing up, users have the option of signing up with a social provider such as Facebook. In this tutorial, I will teach you how to add multiple social providers to a Laravel app using Socialite package. For this tutorial we will add Facebook, Github and Twitter signups.

They start off with a new Laravel application (but, of course, you can use your current one), setting up a new database and creating a custom "users" table that includes "provider" information. The User model is then updated to allow the population of this data and the "make:auth" command is run. The Socialite package is then included and the application is configured to include its service provider. The tutorial then steps you through creating Github, Twitter and Facebook applications, getting the keys needed to drop into your app's configuration. Finally they update the login/registration pages with the social login buttons and how they'll now "magically" work.

tagged: tutorial socalite authentication laravel github twitter facebook

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/laravel-social-authentication-with-socialite

Community News:
DigitalOcean's Hacktoberfest 2016
Sep 29, 2016 @ 09:46:57

It's that time of year again - the perfect time to get involved in Open Source. Why? Because DigitalOcean is back with Hacktoberfest once again, encouraging contributions to Open Source no matter the size.

The Laravel News site sums it up nicely:

Hacktoberfest, the month-long festival of code, is back again this year. The event is hosted in partnership between GitHub and DigitalOcean, and the rules are simple. If you make four pull requests between October 1st and October 31st, you’ll get a t-shirt. It’s available worldwide with no stipulations.

While the real incentive is to get more contributions to Open Source project, there's also a side benefit for those that get in their four pull requests during October: a cool t-shirt bearing the logo for this year's event. All you have to do is contribute and four pull requests to any repository (not your own ideally) before the end of October. If you're not sure of where to start and need some ideas, the Hacktoberfest site has you covered with some great suggestions to get you started.

tagged: hacktoberfest digitalocean github community opensource contribution

Link: https://hacktoberfest.digitalocean.com/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Sculpin Extended: Customizing Your Static Site Blog
Aug 19, 2016 @ 12:22:56

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted helping those Sculpin users out there get the most from their site with some helpful customization tips. Sculpin is a PHP-based static site generation tool that converts Mardon files and Twig templates into HTML documents ready for use.

If you’re a PHP developer and currently running a blog with a static site generator such as Octopress or Jekyll, wouldn’t it be great if you could use your primary language for it? Yes, it’s healthy for us developers to use more than one language, but let’s be honest – we often want to add some functionality to our blogs, but it’s difficult to accomplish in unfamiliar syntax. In this article, we’ll set up Sculpin, a static site generator for PHP. Just like any other static site generator, it uses markdown files and HTML templates to generate your blog, so the transition should be easy.

The tutorial starts by helping you get Sculpin installed (as a phar executable) and move it to where it's globally accessible. With that installed the article then helps you make a simple blog, customize some of the basic settings and start in on a new blog post. With that in place it then gets into the customization, adding in:

  • syntax highlighting
  • Disqus commenting
  • blog archive links

The post finishes up showing you how to deploy the resulting blog into a GitHub pages repository and pushing them out for public consumption.

tagged: sculpin extended tutorial static site github pages syntaxhighligh disquis archive

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/sculpin-extended-customizing-your-static-site-blog/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Nitpicking over Code Standards with Nitpick CI
Jun 03, 2016 @ 13:19:07

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted from Bruno Skvorc showing you how to use Nitpick CI to "nitpick" over coding standards and rules in your PHP code.

There are many ways to make sure your code respects a given code standard – we’ve covered several before. But enforcing a standard team-wide and making sure everyone knows about mistakes before they’re applied to the project isn’t something that’s very easy to do. Travis and Jenkins can both be configured to do these checks, but aren’t as easygoing about it as the solution we’re about to look at: Nitpick CI.

He starts by getting a sample project bootstrapped and pushes it up to GitHub so the Nitpick service can access it. He then switches over to the Nitpick side and shows the setup of an account and a new project pointing to the newly created repo. He then includes the process and results of two kinds of pushes: non-code (README update) and both a valid/invalid code update. He shows examples of the comments the Nitpick service makes directly on the code and a patch to fix the issues.

tagged: nitpickci coding standards github tutorial service

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/nitpicking-over-code-standards-with-nitpick-ci/

Zend Framework Blog:
Announcement: ZF repository renamed!
May 05, 2016 @ 09:57:16

The Zend Framework blog has a post announcing the name change of the main Zend Framework repository on GitHub:

Per the GitHub documentation on renames, existing links will be automatically redirected, and will persist as long as we do not create a new repository with the name "zf2". Redirects occur for: issues, wikis, stars, followers and git operations.

The post also includes the instructions on how to update your current "remotes" in your git checkout (so you don't have to re-clone). It also mentions the change and how it relates to Composer - hint: nothing at all because of how Composer works.

tagged: zendframework2 repository rename zendframework announcement github

Link: http://framework.zend.com/blog/2016-05-03-zf-repo-rename.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Issues, Tags, and Closures (oh my)
Apr 14, 2016 @ 10:37:52

On the Zend Framework blog there's an update from Gary Hockin about some GitHub project-level changes that will be happening soon. He'll be doing some housekeeping on the current list of open issues in the main zf2 repository.

I want to make you aware of some upcoming changes to the issues that are currently logged in GitHub. We currently have 426 open issues that are logged against the (now) meta zf2 repository. The vast majority of these are now in the wrong place, as we've split our once monolithic single repository into the many single component repositories. These issues should be moved from the zf2 repository to the correct component that the issue relates to.

He's closed some issues in preparation and tagged others with a "To Be Closed" tag for later handling. By early May all issues tagged "To Be Closed" will be finished out and/or moved to the correct locations. This will leave the project with around 100 issues to manage and to move to the right locations.

tagged: zendframework2 github repository issues closing tagged

Link: http://framework.zend.com/blog/2016-04-11-issue-closures.html

Laravel News:
Laravel Cheat Sheet
Apr 07, 2016 @ 11:20:09

As is mentioned in this new post to the Laravel News site, there's a handy Laravel Cheat Sheet that's been published to help keep relevant Laravel information at your fingertips.

The Laravel Cheat Sheet is a new project from the EST Group that shows you many of the Laravel features from a filterable web app. For those that have used Laravel for a few years, you may notice the similarities to Jesse O’Briens.

Jesse hasn’t had time to keep his version up to date which left an opening for this new one. However, I’m disappointed in the similarities. Even though both are open source it just feels odd to me that this one looks so much like Jesse’s.

You can view the project directly (via GitHub pages) or grab the source if you'd like to check it out.

tagged: laravel cheatsheet project github information quick reference

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/04/laravel-cheat-sheet/