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Jerzy Zawadzki:
Symfony 4: New Hope
Dec 04, 2017 @ 11:16:56

In a new article to his Medium.com site Jerzy Zawadzki talks about why he things that Symfony 4 is "the new hope" for the framework. In the article he goes through the updates in their major version including code examples, commands and descriptions on each.

On November 30, 2017 new version of Symfony Framework has been released and it looks like core team followed the Star Wars numbering pattern, as 4th version is much better, leaving previous three behind as they look like ‘prequels’ now.

In this article, I will try to sum up all important changes made in Symfony 4, so if you are familiar with Symfony 3 and want to get known with new version? - ?this article is for YOU!

He talks about the changes in developer experience that come along with version 4 and updates to the installation process to make it even simpler. He lists out the packages that are installed in this new version and what's included by default. He then walks through the addition of other packages and tools, pulled in as custom options. Finally he talks about bundles, their use in Symfony 4 and the changes in how applications are structured based on their use.

tagged: symfony symfony4 changes framework version release feature

Link: https://medium.com/@zawadzki.jerzy/symfony-4-new-hope-dbf99dde91d8

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: An Update on Flex
Nov 21, 2017 @ 10:01:46

In a new post to his site Fabien Potencier has posted an update about Symfony 4/Flex and what can be expected from this upcoming release.

Symfony 4 is just around the corner. And Symfony Flex is one of the main selling point for the upgrade. Developers love the new philosophy. And a lot of changes happened since my last blog post. Let me recap the recent changes that you might not be aware of. Most of these changes were prompted by feedback from early adopters.

Included in his list are things like the easier use of recepie contributions, Makefile support changes and minimum PHP version requirements. He also links to an upgrade tutorial and a best practices guide to help you get your application and its code prepared for this new release.

tagged: symfony symfony4 flex update project changes

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-flex-update.html

Scotch.io:
What's New in Laravel 5.5
Jul 07, 2017 @ 13:07:47

The Scotch.io site has posted a new article sharing some of the new features and changes that are coming with Laravel 5.5, the next major release of the framework.

At the time of this writing, Laravel 5.5 is not released yet. It is slated, as the next major release, for release in July 2017. To play around with new features and changes, you need to grab the dev release of Laravel using this Laravel Installer command: laravel new project --dev

The article starts by pointing out that this version will require at least PHP 7.0, a supported and much more performant version of the language. It then covers the changes in this version including:

  • the reintroduction of the "Whoops" library for debugging/error handling
  • a change to vendor:publish to get a new provider prompt
  • email themes
  • automatic package discovery
  • error page design improvements
  • streamlined request validation
  • exception helper functions
  • model factory generators

Each of these items comes with screenshots or code examples showing the new feature at work. It also ends with a few miscellaneous updates mentioning changes in the CSRF handling and the return of a JSON stack trace for API calls.

tagged: laravel version feature update changes php7 v55 framework

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/whats-new-in-laravel-55

Symfony Blog:
The new Symfony 3.3 Service Configuration Changes Explained
May 23, 2017 @ 10:15:27

On the Symfony blog, there's an article posted by Ryan Weaver helping to explain the new service configuration changes that are included with version 3.3 of the framework.

In less than 2 weeks, Symfony 3.3 will be released. It comes with a lot of new stuff, but there is one feature that stands out: the new service configuration. I am very excited about these changes: they're designed to accelerate development, make Symfony easier to learn and encourage best-practices (e.g. injecting specific dependencies instead of using $container->get())... without sacrificing predictability and stability.

The post includes an example of what the new configuration file format will look like and briefly explains some of the changes. For those interested in a more in-depth look, they also link to this page in the Symfony documentation that goes through the changes step by step. It covers the autowiring by default, autoload of services, controllers being registered as services and more. If you're planning on making the move up to v3.3 when it's released (or sometime after) definitely check out this guide to make the transition easier.

tagged: symfony framework service configuration changes explained documentation

Link: http://symfony.com/doc/master/service_container/3.3-di-changes.html

Alejandro Celaya:
My thoughts after migrating some projects to Zend Expressive 2
Mar 28, 2017 @ 10:15:20

Alejandro Celaya has a new post to his site sharing some of his thoughts after migration applications to Zend Expressive 2 and some of his experiences along the way upgrading to this latest version.

The day Zend Expressive 2 was released I was super excited. I have been using it a lot for both professional and personal projects, so I'm quite used to it.

Since I've been using it in many projects, being able to update all of them to version 2 was a challenge, but I can say, I have succeed.

He talks about the projects themselves first, his own site at alejandrocelaya.com and shlink.io, and what kind of functionality they have. He then briefly covers the process to get them migrated and some of the changes he needed to make including:

  • adding an error hander
  • moving to the new error handling middleware strategy
  • using the support for interop middleware (single-pass)
  • small router changes due to using a custom router

He ends the post looking at the shift in programmatic approach Zend Expressive 2 uses (versus v1 handling) and changes he made to his middleware handling to reflect it.

tagged: zendexpressive2 zendexpressive upgrade application process changes

Link: https://blog.alejandrocelaya.com/2017/03/27/my-thoughts-after-migrating-some-projects-to-zend-expressive-2/

Chike Mgbemena:
PHP 7 In-Depth Look
Nov 04, 2016 @ 11:58:51

Chike Mgbemena has posted a great guide for those out there still getting familiar with what PHP 7 has to offer and things to watch for when migrating your PHP 5.x code up to this latest version.

PHP 7 was released on 03 Dec 2015, and so many people have not yet started using or learning about the awesome features it has. I wrote this post to give a breakdown of the features released with PHP 7 for those that have not yet learnt about them and even if you know it, you might still learn something from this post.

Rasmus Lerdorf (creator of PHP) claims that apps running PHP 7 performance is improved by 100% or more. Memory usage is lower also, so if you are running a lot of servers, PHP 7 is an essential upgrade. One of the big changes in PHP 7 is the refactored ZEND Engine(PHPNG) which is now faster, memory usage reduced and a “green” version of PHP which makes you run less hardware to run your code.

He starts with a list of things that have been removed from PHP 7 including the MySQL extension (not mysqli), posix regular expression handling and the deprecation of the "salt" option in password hashing. He goes on to talk about some of the new things that come with PHP 7 including:

  • the "spaceship" operator
  • allowing constants to be defined as arrays (previously just strings)
  • the random_bytes and random_integer functions

He also covers one of the most major changes in PHP 7: the inclusion of type hinting and checking, generators, error handling updates and a few other miscellaneous changes.

tagged: php7 indepth language changes guide

Link: http://chikemgbemena.com/2016/10/29/php-7-in-depth-look/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
A Crash Course of Changes to Exception Handling in PHP 7
Nov 02, 2016 @ 11:10:09

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial they've posted that shares information about changes in the exception handling in PHP 7 and what you need to know about them (and potentially change in your application).

Exception handling saves your code in the most unusual circumstances. PHP 7 has introduced two new classes that assist a developer in handling errors with ease, and that’s what we’ll look at in this post. Before the introduction of these classes in PHP 7, exception error classes were written to handle the different types of errors.

They start with the new "Throwable" interface that's the base for both the "Exception" and "Error" class types. From there the article talks about the "Error" type, showing the list of new errors included in PHP 7: ArithmeticErrors, TypeError, ParseError and AssertionError. It also includes code examples for each showing when they'd be thrown and how you can catch them (more specifically than just catching all exceptions).

tagged: changes exception handling php7 crashcourse

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/a-crash-course-of-changes-to-exception-handling-in-php-7/

In2it:
Decouple Your Framework for Easy Replacement
Aug 12, 2016 @ 11:14:12

In this recent post to the In2it blog Michelangelo van Dam makes a recommendation to decouple your logic from your framework to make it easier in the future if you need to replace it.

Decouple your framework or library from your business logic for future upgrades or replacements through usage of interfaces. By separating your business logic completely from the tool used to glue all things together, you can replace your framework or upgrade to a newer version without much problems.

He talks about how it's common for applications to quickly become "good application turns into a cluster of code on top of a cluster of code". While the title suggests completely swapping out the underlying framework, he shifts it to talk more about updates to the current framework, especially ones that would break non-decoupled functionality. He then covers the ideals of "interoperability" between PHP packages based on common interfaces (like the PSRs) and how following a similar idea can help decouple your code to prevent hard work for future potentially breaking changes.

tagged: framework replacement changes interoperability dependencyinjection example

Link: https://www.in2it.be/2016/08/decouple-framework-library-easy-replacement/

Matt Stauffer:
Routing changes in Laravel 5.3
Jul 28, 2016 @ 09:36:05

In another of his series of posts about the upcoming version of the Laravel framework (v5.3) Matt Stauffer focuses in on some of the changes in routing that are coming down the line.

The last few versions of Laravel have showed the way routing works shifting around a bit. This is usually a sign that we're feeling some sort of pain—something feels off—but haven't found the perfect solution yet. In 5.3, we may have found it.

He starts by looking at some of the routing changes that happened when v5.2 was released including the change away from two groups ("web" and "api"). In v5.3 the major change is the location of the routes definitions containing all of the routes in your application. In the update, this relocation (into a directory) allows you to define multiple route configurations that can be individually changed based on features rather than one global place. He also includes an example of how you can set up your RouteServiceProvider to load in custom configurations as well.

tagged: laravel v53 routing changes directory multiple files configuration

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/routing-changes-in-laravel-5-3

Laravel News:
Laravel 5.3 changes the “app” folder
Jul 22, 2016 @ 09:25:24

On the Laravel News site there's a new article posted about a big change coming to the "app" folder in Laravel-based applications (hint: it's moving towards more simple, not more complex).

As we are getting closer to the launch of Laravel 5.3 new features, seem to come out almost daily. The latest is a change to the “App” folder and in a move to simplify it, the Events, Jobs, Listeners, and Policies folders are now gone.

You can still get them back if you "artisan make" something that fits in one of these four folders but, as they're not really "required" by default they were removed to do some de-cluttering. If you want to find out more about what else is coming/changing in Laravel 5.3, check out this other article also on the Laravel News site.

tagged: laravel changes application app folder events jobs listeners policies

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/07/laravel-5-3-changes-app-folder