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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Re-Introducing Composer – the Cornerstone of Modern PHP Apps
May 22, 2017 @ 11:54:48

If you've been developing any kind of PHP applications lately, chances are you've at least heard of Composer. This package manager has dramatically changed the way we develop in PHP but there are still some out there wondering what all the fuss is about. In this tutorial from SitePoint author Claudio Ribeiro (re-)introduces this powerful tool and provides some basics of its use.

In this article, we will tackle the basics of Composer, and what makes it such a powerful and useful tool.

Before we go into detail, there are two things that we need to have in mind: what Composer is [and] what Composer is not. [...] Essentially, Composer allows you to declare and manage every dependency of your PHP projects.

He then walks you through the installation of the tool, running it either globally or locally (per-project). He lists out some of the basic commands, what they're for and helps you on your way to installing your first package: PHPUnit. He also covers the special "vendor" folder Composer creates, how autoloading works, various configuration values and installing packages globally rather than just locally. He then talks about the other side of the PHP package ecosystem: Packagist including how to submit packages and set up your own package's composer.json so it can be pulled in correctly.

tagged: composer introduction basics tutorial package packagist

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/re-introducing-composer/

Symfony Blog:
Preparing your Applications for PHP 7 with Symfony Polyfills
May 19, 2017 @ 11:07:50

The Symfony blog has posted an article showing you how to prepare your applications for a migration to PHP 7 with the help of various polyfill libraries. These libraries make it possible to use PHP 7 functionality in non-PHP 7 applications if the function in use isn't defined.

According to the May 2017 PHP Stats, 53% of PHP developers use PHP 7.0 or 7.1, but only 10% of Composer packages require PHP 7.0 or higher. In fact, 1 in 4 packages still require PHP 5.3, which is used by less than 1% of developers.

[...] Upgrading your development machines is usually a simple task, but upgrading the rest of the infrastructure (servers, tools, etc.) usually requires more resources. This is where Symfony Polyfills can help you preparing the code of your application for PHP 7.

The article briefly explains what polyfills are and how to load in the current Symfony set via a Composer install. There've provided functionality for PHP versions 5.4 through 5.6 as well as PHP 7.0 and 7.1 to ensure you have the most up to date functionality at your fingertips.

tagged: php7 application symfony polyfill library functionality composer tutorial

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/preparing-your-applications-for-php-7-with-symfony-polyfills

Rob Allen:
Autocomplete Composer script names on the command line
May 15, 2017 @ 09:43:22

Rob Allen has a quick new post with a handy script you can use to auto-complete Composer script names on the command line (for bash).

As I add more and more of my own script targets to my composer.json files, I find that it would be helpful to have tab autocomplete in bash. I asked on Twitter and didn't get an immediate solution and as I had already done something similar for Phing, I rolled up my sleeves and wrote my own.

He created the bash completion file where Bash could locate it (a special "bash_completion.d" directory). He includes the code you'll need to have in the bash script and briefly explains how each line works. He also includes an example of the output showing how the script catches both the built-in and custom commands as auto-complete options.

tagged: autocomplete composer script bash commandline tutorial

Link: https://akrabat.com/autocomplete-composer-script-names-on-the-command-line/

BitExpert Blog:
(Partially) solving the require-dev problem
May 10, 2017 @ 09:47:57

In this post to the bitExpert blog Stephan Hochdörfer shares some updates to his own opinions on the "require-dev gone wrong" problem he previously posted about. In this new post he points out that, while there is an issue here, it's not something that can't be resolved (or has been to some extent).

The gist of all this is that, yes, we do have a problem. Fortunately, there are already solutions out there - none of them perfect, but there's always room for improvement isn't there? Installing .phars with Composer is currently not supported out-of-the-box by Composer but there are 2 projects to help us deal with it: One is tooly-composer-script - a Composer plugin that manages to pull .phar files from a remote location. The other one is PHIVE - the PHAR Installation and Verification Environment.

He points out that, while these two packages help the situation, there's still another "require-dev" issue with tools that don't actually "touch" the code. This requires that a certain version of the tool be run against a certain version of your code, creating a dependency of a different kind. Fortunately there's also a tool to help some with this as well, the php-scoper project that makes it easier to isolate functionality through randomly generated namespaces.

tagged: phar requiredev composer problem tools phive tooly phpscoper

Link: https://blog.bitexpert.de/blog/solving-the-require-dev-problem/

BugSnag:
Building maintainable PHP apps using Composer
Apr 03, 2017 @ 12:14:02

The BugSnag blog has a post by guest author Graham Campbell sharing some best practices when using Composer in your PHP applications. It's written mainly for those that haven't used Composer much yet and want to get started quickly and easily.

Composer has made big waves in the PHP community in recent years. Thanks to Composer’s creators, Jordi Boggiano and Nils Adermann, Composer has become the absolute backbone of PHP’s package infrastructure today.

In this blog post, we shall be introducing Composer, from the ground up. We will see what packages are, how they should be versioned, and how to install them into your application. Learn about Composer and never look back!

He starts out by defining what a package is in the world of Composer and how it differs from a "library". He then briefly touches on the early days of the tool before showing how to get it installed and creating your first "composer.json" configuration file. He then gets into one of the more tricky subjects when dealing with Composer and packages - versioning. Finally he covers a few of his suggested best practices when using Composer including defining your own package installation constraints and how the autoloading works to your benefit.

tagged: composer bestpractices introduction configuration package library tool

Link: https://blog.bugsnag.com/best-practices-using-composer/

Leonid Mamchenkov:
Validating JSON against schema in PHP
Mar 13, 2017 @ 11:13:53

In this new post to his site Leonid Mamchenkov talks about validating JSON content sent to your application to ensure it matches a JSON schema definition.

GitHub was rather slow yesterday, which affected the speed of installing composer dependencies (since most of them are hosted on GitHub anyway). Staring at a slowly scrolling list of installed dependencies, I noticed something interesting.

Of course, I’ve heard of the seld/jsonlint before. It’s a port of zaach/jsonlint JavaScript tool to PHP, written by Jordi Boggiano, aka Seldaek, the genius who brought us composer dependency manager and packagist.org repository.

But JSON schema? What’s that?

From there he gets into a high level definition of what JSON schema is and the similarities it has to XML's structure. He then links to a PHP package that can help with the validation and how to use it (defining a simple JSON file, a schema and the code to perform the evaluation).

tagged: json schema validation package composer tutorial

Link: http://mamchenkov.net/wordpress/2017/03/11/validating-json-against-schema-in-php/http://mamchenkov.net/wordpress/2017/03/11/validating-json-against-schema-in-php/

Leonid Mamchenkov:
composer-patches – Simple patches plugin for Composer
Jan 31, 2017 @ 09:22:18

Leonid Mamchenkov has an interesting post to his site detailing a plugin for the popular Composer package management tool that makes it easier to apply patches to the current version of libraries in use: composer-patches

composer-patches is a plugin for Composer which helps with applying patches to the installed dependencies. It supports patches from URLs, local files, and from other dependencies.

This plugin makes it so that, during the normal Composer installation flow, you can apply your own patches to fix functionality that may not be corrected upstream yet. It replaces the need to "fork and fix" in your own version of the repository and cleans up the process to a more automated flow. It can also help when working with multiple people on the same code that's not your own and apply their patches to evaluate their changes.

You can find more information about the composer-packages plugin in the README on its GitHub repository.

tagged: composer patch plugin introduction example usage

Link: http://mamchenkov.net/wordpress/2017/01/31/composer-patches-simple-patches-plugin-for-composer/

Laravel News:
Checking the Code Complexity of your App
Jan 11, 2017 @ 11:52:58

On the Laravel News site there's an article posted showing you how to determine the complexity of your application using the phploc tool from Sebastian Bergmann.

Yesterday, Taylor made a post comparing the code complexity between Laravel and other frameworks. The tool he used to generate these reports is called phploc and it’s very easy to run on your own code base.

I decided as a means of comparison I would run that on the codebase for this site and just see what the results are.

The tutorial walks you through the installation of the tool (as a globally installed Composer package), how to execute it and what the results look like. These results include a lot of data including:

  • Average Class Length
  • Average Complexity per LLOC
  • (Use of) Global Constants
  • (Number of) Namespaces

phploc is useful for getting the overall numbers but he wanted something a bit more specific. For that he chose the PhpMetrics package that allows for deeper introspection into files and classes in your code to locate the complexity and find spots for refactoring.

tagged: code complexity tool phploc phpmetrics example composer tutorial

Link: https://laravel-news.com/code-complexity-tools

Master Zend Framework:
How To Use Forked Repositories In Composer
Dec 21, 2016 @ 12:40:09

The Master Zend Framework site has continued their series covering Composer and some more advanced concepts than just the usual introduction. In this new tutorial Matthew Setter shows you how to work with forked repositories.

Have you ever submitted a patch to a repository which your application relies on, but, because that patch is vital to the uptime of your application, you can’t wait for it to be reviewed and merged into the next release?

In times like these, it’s fair to want them to move faster than they normally would, so that you don’t have to wait for the normal review, merge, and release cycles. [...] But, you may urgently need the patch to be applied and released. So, what do you do? In times like these, you can use Composer’s ability to use custom repositories, specifically a fork which you create and patch.

If this sounds appealing to you — because perhaps you’re in this very situation right now — let’s now step through the process of modifying your composer.json configuration so that you can use one.

He walks through the Composer configuration you'll need to update to work with the forked repository as you'd expect. He also covers changes that would need to be made for working with private repositories and using local files instead of remote.

tagged: fork repository composer tutorial series

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/series/tooling/composer/forked-repositories/

Paul Jones:
Package Development Standards: "pds/skeleton" Now Open For Review!
Dec 16, 2016 @ 10:54:14

Paul Jones has a post to his site with a proposal for a standard structure for PHP packages to help provide consistency across the PHP package ecosystem. His proposal - the Package Development Standards initiative - defines the structure of the repository instead of conventions to be used in the package itself (like naming or object structure).

The new pds/skeleton (and the related research) for public review. If you are a package author, you are invited to post your comments and criticisms of the publication as issues on the relevant Github repository.

The pds/skeleton publication describes a set of standard top-level PHP package directories and files. If you are an author of more than three packages on Packagist, chances are you already follow the standard! That’s because PDS initiative researches the PHP package ecosystem to recognize commonly adopted development practices.

He's putting it out there for public review for now until he can get some feedback from the community on the structure and recommendations made. He also recommends going a head and adding "pds/skeleton" to your "require-dev" section to indicate your compliance to the suggestions he's presented.

tagged: package structure repository standard definition opinion composer

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6457