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PHPClasses.org:
Lately in PHP Podcast #48 - To TDD or Not TDD?
June 27, 2014 @ 11:38:37

On the PHPClasses.org site today Manuel Lemos has released the latest episode in their "Lately in PHP" podcast series: Episode #48 - To TDD or Not TDD?.

Lately the debate about whether you should use TDD or not in all software projects all the time has been very intense. [...] They also talked about the upcoming end of life release of PHP 5.3, getting information of parameter type hinting with reflection, using object methods on native data types, security problems of OAuth implementations, and the built-in support of Composer to access password protected repositories.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or you can watch the live recording over on the PHPClasses YouTube playlist. A transcription of the recording is also provided as well as links to some of the topics mentioned.

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phpclasses latelyinphp ep48 podcast tdd typehint oauth security composer

Link: http://www.phpclasses.org/blog/post/239-To-TDD-or-Not-TDD--Lately-in-PHP-podcast-episode-48.html

Acquia Blog:
5 PHP Components every Drupal 8 Developer should know Part 1 - Composer
June 25, 2014 @ 12:04:23

On the Acquia blog there's a new post from Kris Vanderwater, Developer Evangelist, starting off a series of "Five PHP Components Every Drupal 8 Developer Should Know". In this first post he covers something that's more of a tool to deal with components and dependencies - working with Composer.

Drupal 8 has made a lot of changes. Architectural and technical changes abound, but Drupal 8 has also brought social changes. We're not really feeling the full effects of those changes quite yet, but with time, I believe the implications of Drupal 8's new direction will have an amazing impact for the good of our community. A big part of those changes was the decision to adopt outside code. [...] Interoperability is the driving force of this renaissance and that interoperability has been fueled by a combination of: [a few things including] the timely appearance of a tool known as Composer.

He briefly introduces the tool to those not familiar with it and its purpose. He links to some of the installation instructions, both global and local to a single project. He includes an example "composer.json" (to install the popular Guzzle HTTP tool) and running the "install" command. He gets into the directory structure and files that are created as a part of the installation. He also looks more deeply at the classmap file and how that relates to the files downloaded.

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acquia component introduction drupal8 top5 composer

Link: https://www.acquia.com/blog/5-php-components-every-drupal-8-developer-should-know-part-1-composer

Jordi Boggiano:
Authentication management in Composer
May 28, 2014 @ 11:07:35

Jordi Boggiano has posted about a new feature in Composer, the popular dependency manager for PHP, around the handling of authentication information.

Up until today if you run a home-grown package repository serving private packages it was quite a pain to use with Composer. You did not have efficient way to password-protect the repository except by inlining the password in the composer.json or by typing the username/password every single time. With the merge of PR#1862 and some further improvements you can now remove credentials from your composer.json!

The new functionality allows for the external storage of the credentials in a file, either globally of in one relative to the repository. He also includes the command you can use to configure and set these username/password combinations and have them stored in the "auth.json" file.

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composer authentication management username password authjson json

Link: http://seld.be/notes/authentication-management-in-composer

Clear Code Blog:
How to Manage Your Application Setup with Composer
May 27, 2014 @ 11:50:55

On the Clear Code blog today there's an article posted showing you how to manage your application with Composer, the PHP dependency manager that's taken the PHP community by storm.

Composer is a dependency management tool for PHP based projects. It allows you to declare, install, and then manage all of your dependencies in your project. Right, so you can manage the libraries that your project requires in order to work. But is that all you can really do with Composer? Definitely not! In fact, I believe this is a very small part of Composer and its possibilities. In this article, I'll try to show you how Composer can be used for performing more complex tasks in PHP based projects.

He shows how to set up a system where even the base parts of the applications become dependencies and can be built up as a part of the Composer install. He includes an example of pulling from a private version control source and the matching "composer.json" file the repository will need. He also includes the composer commands to get the install up and running as well as a warning about handling credentials as a part of the execution.

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tutorial application dependency management composer

Link: http://clearcode.cc/2014/05/manage-application-setup-composer/

Fabien Potencier:
The rise of Composer and the fall of PEAR
May 05, 2014 @ 09:17:32

Fabien Potencier has a new post to his site today talking about a recent trend in the PHP community around dependency and package management, the rise of Composer and the fall of PEAR.

As a good package manager to let user easily install plugin/bundles/MODs was probably also a big concern for phpBB, I talked to Nils about this topic during this 2011 hackday in San Francisco. After sharing my thoughts about libzypp, "..., I [Nils] wrote the first lines of what should become Composer a few months later". [...] So, what about PEAR? PEAR served the PHP community for many years, and I think it's time now to make it die.

He goes on to talk about how he personally has used PEAR in the past and when he stopped work on Phirum, a simplified PEAR channel manager. Based on some logging results, he found that most dependencies on his channels were related to PHPUnit's needs. When Sebastian Bergmann announced the move of PHPUnit away from PEAR Fabien decided to make his own move to deprecate and eventually remove new releases from the PEAR sources.

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composer pear package manage deprecate

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/article/72/the-rise-of-composer-and-the-fall-of-pear

ServerGrove Blog:
Running Composer with HHVM, not so fast!
April 21, 2014 @ 12:46:02

On the ServerGrove blog today they share some interesting results when it comes to using Composer on a normal PHP install versus using it inside of a HHVM instance.

HHVM is an open-source virtual machine developed by Facebook and designed for executing programs written in Hack and PHP. It offers increased performance for PHP, most of the time. [...] Since Composer needs to perform some heavy computations in order to resolve the dependencies of a project, it makes sense to use HHVM. However, the heavy computations are mainly done when running composer update, or when the composer.lock file has not yet been generated so this is where you will see most of your gains in execution time.

With a bit more testing, this is shown to be true (about a 7 second difference). However, this is only on the "update". The "install" command actually takes longer inside of the HHVM instance, regardless of if the JIT (Just In Time) compiler is disabled or not.

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composer install update speed performance benchmark

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2014/04/17/running-composer-hhvm-fast

Community News:
PHPUnit Announced End of Life on PEAR Installation Method
April 21, 2014 @ 10:29:53

There's a new addition to the GitHub wiki that's quite important for the PHPUnit users out there. Sebastian Bergmann has officially announced the end of life for the PEAR version of the installer for the popular PHPUnit tool.

Since PHPUnit 3.7, released in the fall of 2012, using the PEAR Installer was no longer the only installation method for PHPUnit. Today most users of PHPUnit prefer to use a PHP Archive (PHAR) of PHPUnit or Composer to download and install PHPUnit. Starting with PHPUnit 4.0 the PEAR package of PHPUnit was merely a distribution mechanism for the PHP Archive (PHAR) and many of PHPUnit's dependencies were no longer released as PEAR packages. Furthermore, the PEAR installation method has been removed from the documentation. We are taking the next step in retiring the PEAR installation method with today's release of PHPUnit 3.7.35 and PHPUnit 4.0.17.

Included in this end of life, they'll also be decommissioning pear.phpunit.de to happen no later than the end of 2014.

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pear phpunit install method composer phar download

Link: https://github.com/sebastianbergmann/phpunit/wiki/End-of-Life-for-PEAR-Installation-Method

Zumba Engineering Blog:
Enforce code standards with composer, git hooks, and phpcs
April 15, 2014 @ 09:13:48

The Zumba Engineering blog has a new post looking at a way you can control code quality and standards with the help of Composer, git hooks and the PHP Code Sniffer (phpcs) tools.

Maintaining code quality on projects where there are many developers contributing is a tough assignment. How many times have you tried to contribute to an open-source project only to find the maintainer rejecting your pull request on the grounds of some invisible coding standard? [...] Luckily there are tools that can assist maintainers. In this post, I'll be going over how to use composer, git hooks, and phpcs to enforce code quality rules.

These three technologies are combined together to make a more seamless experience for the developer while keeping the code quality high. Their method makes use of the "scripts" (post-install-cmd) feature of Composer to, after the installation of all packages, set up a git hook script that will run the phpcs checks on pre-commit. It's a pretty simple shell script that kicks back any errors it might find before the user can commit their changes.

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code standards composer git hook phpcs codesniffer install precommit

Link: http://engineering.zumba.com/2014/04/14/control-code-quality

Matthias Noback:
There's no such thing as an optional dependency
April 11, 2014 @ 11:19:19

In his latest post Matthias Noback suggests the idea that there's no such thing as an optional dependency when it comes to working with packages and Composer.

On several occasions I have tried to explain my opinion about "optional dependencies" (also known as "suggested dependencies" or "dev requirements") and I'm doing it again: "There's no such thing as an optional dependency." I'm talking about PHP packages here and specifically those defined by a composer.json file.

So that everyone's on the same page, he starts with an example of a true dependency in a sample adapter class. He asks the usual question - "what's needed to run this code?" - and looking a bit deeper at the "suggested" packages. As it turns out, some of these dependencies turn into actual requirements when you need certain features of the tool. He points out that this is a problem with quite a few packages in the Composer ecosystem and proposes a solution - splitting packages based on requirements. He gives an example based on his adapter with a Mongo requirement split off into a "knplabs/gaufrette-mongo-gridfs" package that's more descriptive of the requirements.

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optional dependency composer packagist suggested package

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2014/04/theres-no-such-thing-as-an-optional-dependency/

Gary Hockin:
Less is More
April 07, 2014 @ 09:56:36

Gary Hockin has a new post to his site talking about how he's found that less is more when it comes to what to include in your "composer.json". He works through some of his own opinions on the matter and suggests a bit more thought before just including another library.

I have absolutely no doubt this post will be largely disagreed upon by many in the PHP community, but I've had a terrible day and I'm hoping that the process of just getting this off my chest will be therapeutic in some way. [...] So, today I sat down and started writing the tests for our new lightweight SDK that offsets much of the work needed in the delivery of the adverts to workers via a Beanstalk queue. It should have been so easy. Things went well for the early part until I realised that I wanted to be able to extract and serialise our Device object to put it into the queue, and then hydrate it back into a Device object inside the worker

He assumed that since he'd used Zend Framework 2 a good bit and there were no (declared) dependencies, he could directly use an individual component. Unfortunately, there was a dependency (ZendFilterChain), requiring another package to be added via Composer and pulled down. He points out that Composer has made this almost too easy and developers maybe aren't as thoughtful about the libraries they pull in because of it.

He makes a call out to developers to remember the idea behind the MicroPHP Manifesto and really think about the code they're puling in, how large it is and if it's what they really need. He's not suggesting that Composer is the problem, rather the blind usage of it without thinking through the implications.

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less more library composer packagist include

Link: http://blog.hock.in/2014/04/05/less-is-more


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