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Laravel News:
How to use WordPress as a backend for a Laravel Application
Aug 17, 2016 @ 12:51:08

The Laravel News site has posted an interesting tutorial where they describe the use of WordPress as a backend for a Laravel application. This setup is based on the Laravel News' own experience with it in the recent refactoring of the site.

Last week I relaunched Laravel News, and the new site is running on Laravel with WordPress as the backend. I’ve been using WordPress for the past two years, and I’ve grown to enjoy the features that it provides. The publishing experience, the media manager, the mobile app, and Jetpack for tracking stats.

I wasn’t ready to give these features up, and I didn’t have the time to build my own system, so I decided to keep WordPress and just use an API plugin to pull all the content I needed out, then store it in my Laravel application. In this tutorial, I wanted to outline how I set it all up.

While he did find other methods for linking the two, they didn't quite fit with what he wanted so he worked up his own. The content is then synced via a recurring task pulling over posts, categories and tags. He gets into the WordPress REST API first, showing the extraction of the posts from the API and pushing them into a Laravel collection. There's also an example of how to sync a post with the database (API) and how to create a new post in a similar way. Also included is the code to get the featured image, get the category for a post and sync the tag values. The tutorial finishes with the code for the sync command and pushing it into the scheduler.

tagged: wordpress backend laravel application tutorial rest api

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/08/wordpress-api-with-laravel/

TutsPlus.com:
Building a WordPress-Powered Front End With the WP REST API and AngularJS: Intro & Set
Aug 05, 2016 @ 11:17:36

The TutsPlus.com site has kicked off a new tutorial series today with part one of a look at using the WordPress REST API and AngularJS to create an API-powered frontend application.

In this series about building a WordPress-powered front end with the WP REST API and AngularJS, we will put the knowledge acquired in the introductory series to use. We will learn how we can leverage this knowledge to decouple the conventional theme-admin model supported by WordPress until now. We will plan and build a single-page application (that I've named Quiescent) with a WordPress back end which will feature posts, users, and categories listing pages. We will configure AngularJS routing and build a custom directive and controllers for the resources mentioned above.

In this first part of the series they walk you through some of the planning steps before the application even gets written (including wireframes). From there they get a bare-bones HTML structure setup for the Angular app to live in and make a matching WordPress plugin. This plugin will return a featured image, author name, associated categories and image resize data related to a post. The code for the plugin is included.

tagged: wordpress api frontend angularjs tutorial plugin wireframe planning series part1

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-a-wordpress-powered-front-end-with-the-wp-rest-api-and-angularjs-introduction-and-setup--cms-26115

TutsPlus.com:
Internationalizing WordPress Projects: A Practical Example, Part 1
Jul 06, 2016 @ 10:50:43

Tom McFarlin has continued his series covering internationalization in WordPress applications with this latest part of the series. In the previous part of the series he introduced some of the basic topics and terms. In this new tutorial he gets more into functionality creating the plugin he'll use in his examples.

Given that WordPress powers roughly 25% of the web and that the web is not local to your country of origin, it makes sense to ensure that the work that we produce can be translated into other locations.

To be clear, this does not mean that you, as the developer, are responsible for translating all of the strings in your codebase into the various languages that your customers may use. Instead, it means that you use the proper APIs to ensure someone else can come along and provide translations for them.

He then walks you through the download of the latest WordPress version (a Subversion checkout) and the creation of the plugin structure. He provides sample code to define the plugin and shows how it should look in the "Plugins" listing. He helps you add in the menu item with internationalized strings for the link text. They help you add a simple screen for the plugin and help you style the page a bit. The post ends with a brief mention of object-oriented programming but points out that OOP introduces other, not necessarily related, topics that could detract from the WordPress-related content (and so will not be used).

tagged: wordpress internationalization i18n tutorial series part2 plugin example practical

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/internationalizing-wordpress-projects-a-practical-example-part-1--cms-26676

TutsPlus.com:
Internationalizing WordPress Projects: The Introduction
Jun 28, 2016 @ 10:38:01

The TutsPlus.com site has kicked off a new set of posts today with he first part of their series covering internationalization in WordPress applications.

A few years ago, I wrote about the process of internationalizing WordPress-based projects. Though I think there are some times when tutorials don't necessarily need updating, refreshing, or revisiting, there are other times in which we can all benefit from revisiting the topic.

After all, software changes from year to year, and we also gain experience as we continue to work with a given piece of software. WordPress is no different.

They'll be covering what internationalization is, how it works within WordPress, the difference between internationalization and localization and more. In this first part of the series, though, they briefly cover some of the functions and functionality you might see as a part of WordPress already to make internationalization possible.

tagged: internationalization wordpress tutorial series part1 introduction

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/internationalizing-wordpress-projects-the-introduction--cms-26636

NetTuts.com:
Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using the WordPress Rules
Jun 21, 2016 @ 13:21:45

The TutsPlus.com site continues their series covering the use of the PHP_CodeSniffer tool with WordPress in this latest post. In this new tutorial they show you how to install and use the WordPress-specific coding "sniffs".

If you're just joining the series, we've been discussing the topic of code smells, how to refactor them, and tools that are available to help us automate some of the monotony that comes with doing so, especially within PHP programming.

[...] If you've made it this far, I assume you're a WordPress developer, and you're interested in getting PHP CodeSniffer configured such that it can sniff out any problems in your code as it relates to the WordPress Coding Standards. That's good! Because in the remainder of this article, that's exactly what we're going to cover.

The tutorial helps you install the WordPress sniffs and how to add them to the standards supported by your local phpcs installation. The command to execute them against your WordPress plugin is included as well as example output and how to refactor those issues away.

tagged: phpcodesniffer smells tutorial wordpress install setup

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-php-codesniffer-with-wordpress-installing-and-using-the-wordpress-rules--cms-26443

Scotch.io:
Full E-Commerce Integration of Snipcart with WordPress
Jun 17, 2016 @ 11:03:24

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial for the WordPress users out there needing an ecommerce solution and wanting to integrate it seamlessly into your site. They show you how to integrate Snipcart, part of a platform that handles a lot of the common ecommerce tasks for you.

Even though an exponential amount of online tools keep popping up, WordPress remains a domineering web behemoth. More than 25% of active sites run on the famous CMS. Quite a chunk of the whole world wide web.

[...] Many front-end developers I've met and talked to enjoy working with a lean, quick e-commerce solution like Snipcart. But, they also want to give more autonomy in familiar CMS to their merchant clients. Since many of them use WordPress, I thought I'd write this article to provide them with a useful resource.

The post then breaks the process down into a few different steps, each including code and screenshots as needed:

  • Installing the required plugins
  • Show products in the theme
  • Integrate Snipcart's shopping cart
  • Update inventory with webhooks
  • Add Snipcart data to WordPress admin
  • Quick edit of inventory

If you're interested in the full code required for the integration, you can see it over on this GitHub repository.

tagged: scotchio ecommerce solution snipcart wordpress tutorial integration

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/full-e-commerce-integration-of-snipcart-with-wordpress

TutsPlus.com:
Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using PHP CodeSniffer
Jun 15, 2016 @ 12:38:21

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series showing the use of the PHP CodeSniffer tool with WordPress. In the first part of the series they introduced "code smells" and build on that in part two with the installation and use of PHP CodeSniffer to detect these smells.

In the first article of this series, we defined code smells and looked at a few examples of what they are and how we may refactor them so the quality of the code is improved.

[...] Ultimately, we're working towards implementing WordPress-specific code sniffing rules, but before we do that it's important to familiarize yourself with PHP CodeSniffer. In this article, we're going to take a look at what PHP CodeSniffer is, how to install it, how to run it against an example script, and how to refactor said script. Then we'll look at how we're going to move forward into WordPress-specific code.

The tutorial then shows you how to get the tool installed using Composer, not the PEAR method. They help you install Composer then create the simple project with a composer.json configuration file defining the dependency. They provide a sample bit of code to run the analysis against and an example of the output showing violations of the coding standard.

tagged: wordpress tutorial phpcodesniffer coding standards series part2

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-php-codesniffer-with-wordpress-installing-and-using-php-codesniffer--cms-26394

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Monitoring WordPress Apps with the ELK Stack
Jun 13, 2016 @ 13:21:25

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial from Daniel Berman showing you how to use the ELK stack to monitor WordPress applications, a combination of Elastic Search, Logstash and Kibana. You can find out about setting this stack up in this previous tutorial.

When something does go wrong, one of the first things you’re going to want to look at are the log files. Not because you enjoy it — log files are not easy to decipher — but because they contain valuable information that can shed light on what exactly occurred.

While [you can use the WP Log Viewer], analyzing WordPress and PHP logs is simply not enough. There are also web server and database logs to sift through. To successfully query huge volumes of log messages coming in from various sources and identify correlations, a more solid solution is required.

Enter the ELK Stack.

He shows how to enable the logging features in your WordPress application (in the wp-config file) and ensure they're not output to the users of your site. He then shows you how to install Filebeat to ship the logs over to the ELK stack. He switches over to the ELK side and shows the configuration needed on Logstash to properly handle the WordPress log format. The remainder of the post helps you get started analyzing the log results and limit it down to only what you need via the Kibana query syntax.

tagged: elk stack monitor wordpress elasticsearch kibana logstash tutorial query

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/monitoring-wordpress-apps-with-the-elk-stack/

TutsPlus.com:
Using Let's Encrypt SSL With Your WordPress Project
May 24, 2016 @ 12:53:11

The TutsPlus.com site has posted a tutorial for the WordPress users out there about using Let's Encrypt and SSL certificates to easily secure your installation.

For years, purchasing, renewing, installing and managing SSL certificates overwhelmed me with expense and complexity. Now, Let's Encrypt makes it fairly simple and free.

Let’s Encrypt is an emerging, free, automated, and open certificate authority brought to you by a California public benefit corporation called the Internet Security Research Group—it also has nonprofit status. [...] In this tutorial, I'll walk you through installing Let's Encrypt on a few of my websites, including my WordPress consulting website, http://lookahead.io, soon to be https://.

You'll need a be a bit comfortable working at the command line to use the Let's Encrypt client, but they walk you through each step of the process explaining everything along the way. They start with a basic list of features the Let's Encrypt service provides and the requirements you'll need to get started. Screenshots of the setup wizard are included and the "one small difference" you'll need to make when using it with WordPress. They link to the SSL Labs site to help you verify the certificate is working as expected and finish with setting up the auto-renewal of the certificate via a simple cron job.

tagged: wordpress letsencrypt install setup configure ssl certificate free

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-lets-encrypt-ssl-with-your-wordpress-project--cms-22303

TutsPlus.com:
Kick-Start WordPress Development With Twig: Timber Image, Menu, and User
May 02, 2016 @ 10:51:47

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at integrating WordPress and Twig with a look at showing images, menus and users in your WordPress UI.

By now you have read about the basic concepts of using Twig through Timber, while building a modular WordPress theme. We've also studied block nesting and multiple inheritance with Twig, based on the DRY principle. Today, we are going to explore how to display attachment images, WordPress menus, and users in a theme with Twig through the Timber plugin.

They go through each of the topics (images, menus and users) and provide the code needed to both gather the data needed and the templates to render the views. This all makes heavy use of the Timber functionality to integrate it with the overall WordPress structure. Screenshots are also included of the resulting output to help you ensure things are working as expected.

tagged: kickstart wordpress development twig timber tutorial series part5

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/kick-start-wordpress-development-with-twig-timber-image-menu-and-user--cms-25750