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TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 3
Dec 01, 2016 @ 11:15:35

TutsPlus.com has continued their series covering object-oriented development practices in WordPress (plugins) with this third tutorial. In previous parts they set up the environment and introduced some of the basic concepts of OOP programming and getting the first classes and files defined.

In the last tutorial, we reviewed the original state of our autoloader and then went through a process of object-oriented analysis and design. The purpose of doing this is so that we can tie together everything that we've covered in this series and the introductory series.

Secondly, the purpose of doing this in its own tutorial is so we can spend the rest of this time walking through our class, seeing how each part fits together, implementing it in our plugin, and then seeing how applying object-oriented programming and the single responsibility principle can lead to a more focused, maintainable solution.

They start with a brief review of what they've covered so far and begin to build on the changes suggested in the previous part of the series. They've already broken it down into the different functional classes (according to the single-responsibility principle) and take the next step of including them and calling some example code to prove all is working as expected.

tagged: oop wordpress tutorial series objectoriented programming plugin part3

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-3--cms-27515

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 2
Nov 30, 2016 @ 09:33:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next tutorial in their "Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress" series - part two - expanding on the basics presented in the previous part of the series.

In the previous tutorial, we covered a handful of concepts, all of which are going to be necessary to fully understand what we're doing in this tutorial. Specifically, we covered the following topics: object-oriented interfaces, the single responsibility principle, how these look in PHP [and] where we're headed with our plugin.

[...] Ultimately, we won't be writing much code in this tutorial, but we'll be writing some. It is, however, a practical tutorial in that we're performing object-oriented analysis and design. This is a necessary phase for many large-scale projects (and something that should happen for small-scale projects).

First they briefly cover the environment you'll need to follow along (already set up if you followed along with part one). They then get back into the code, evaluating the current state of the custom autoloader and investigating how it can be broken down into a class and a set of methods instead of procedural code. They work through the different functional parts of the autoloader and how to break it down into classes with only one job (the "single responsibility principle"). They end up with the autoloader that uses NamespaceValidator, FileInvestigator and FileRegistry instances to get the job done.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part2 series refactor singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-2--cms-27431

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 1
Nov 18, 2016 @ 13:57:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at autoloading in WordPress plugins. In this latest post the most from just the namespacing and setup into the actual code - creating some simple object-oriented classes that can be easily autoloaded.

I recently wrapped up a series in which I covered namespaces and autoloading in WordPress. If you're not familiar with either of the above terms, then I recommend checking out the series. [...] While working on the series, specifically that of the autoloader, I couldn't help but recognize a number of code smells that were being introduced as I was sharing the code with you.

This isn't to say the autoloader is bad or that it doesn't work. If you've downloaded the plugin, run it, or followed along and written your own autoloader, then you know that it does in fact work. But in a series that focuses on namespaces—something that's part and parcel of object-oriented programming—I couldn't help but feel uncomfortable leaving the autoloader in its final state at the end of the series.

They move away from just autoloading and namespacing quickly and move into OOP concepts like interfaces, implementing them, the "single-responsibility principle" and a few other helpful principles. They define the goals for the work ahead and move into the code, updating the current state of the plugin to use these new ideas.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part1 series interface singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-1--cms-27381

TutsPlus.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 3
Nov 15, 2016 @ 10:23:30

On the TutsPlus.com site they've continued their WordPress series showing you how to integrate class autoloading into your plugin development.

In this tutorial, we're going to take a break from writing code and look at what PHP namespaces and autoloaders are, how they work, and why they are beneficial. Then we'll prepare to wrap up this series by implementing them in code.

In the previous part of the series they built up the environment and some of the basic structure of the plugin (you'll need this to follow along with this new tutorial) and continue on, starting with the basics of namespacing and autoloading. They then move over and start applying this functionality to the plugin classes and what happens in the autoloader when they're referenced.

tagged: wordpress autoload namespace tutorial part3 series

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-3--cms-27332

Zend Developer Zone:
WordPress updates Plugin Guidelines
Nov 11, 2016 @ 12:55:11

The Zend Developer Zone has a new post with information about some updates from the WordPress project about what plugin authors must do to be compliant with the rules of the WordPress Plugin Directory.

After five years, the WordPress plugin team has updated the Plugin Guidelines. These are the guidelines that WordPress plugin authors must comply with to be included in the WordPress Plugin Directory.

The guidelines were soft-launched last month so that they could be vetted by the larger plugin developer community community. On November 1st, 2017, they were officially announced “Revised Guidelines Are Live” by Mika Epstein.

Overall, these guidelines are good. They are solid, well communicated and clear to anyone who reads them.

The ZDZ post focuses in on just two of the guidelines that were updated with a few brief thoughts in each:

  • #4. Keep your code (mostly) human readable
  • #9, The plugin and its developers must not do anything illegal, dishonest, or morally offensive

They point out that, while the intent is good for #9, the term "morally offensive" is very broad and could be interpreted in many ways by many different groups.

tagged: wordpress plugin update directory official guidelines

Link: https://devzone.zend.com/7331/wordpress-updates-plugin-guidelines/

TutsPlus.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 2
Nov 03, 2016 @ 11:55:25

The TutsPlus.com site has continued their series looking at namespace-based autoloading in WordPress applications with part two. In this latest article they build on the simple plugin from part one and enhancing it with more functionality and autoloaded classes.

In the previous tutorial, we began talking about namespaces and autoloading with PHP in the context of WordPress development. And although we never actually introduced either of those two topics, we did define them and begin laying the foundation for how we'll introduce them in an upcoming tutorial.

Before we do that, though, there's some functionality that we need to complete to round out our plugin. The goal is to finish the plugin and its functionality so that we have a basic, object-oriented plugin that's documented and works well with one caveat; it doesn't use namespaces or autoloading.

This, in turn, will give us the chance to see what a plugin looks like before and after introducing these topics.

They start off with a quick review of the setup and previous development work done on the plugin making it easier to load in Javascript templates in a dynamic way. The plugin is then ready to start helping with the plugin use. They add in a basic CSS file to the site's "assets" folder and enqueue it. They start updating the plugin code, adding in an assets interface, a CSS loader and some styling for the box shown on the edit post interface.

tagged: namespace autoload wordpress plugin introduction part2 series autoload css loader

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-part-2--cms-27203

TutsPlus.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 1
Oct 21, 2016 @ 10:43:38

The TutsPlus.com site has posted a new tutorial for the WordPress developers out there showing you how to get started with namespacing and autoloading in your WordPress installation.

Namespaces and autoloading are not topics that are usually discussed when it comes to working with WordPress plugins. Some of this has to do with the community that's around it, some of this has to do with the versions of PHP that WordPress supports, and some of it simply has to do with the fact that not many people are talking about it. And that's okay, to an extent.

Neither namespaces nor autoloading are topics that you absolutely need to use to create plugins. They can, however, provide a better way to organize and structure your code as well as cut down on the number of require, require_once, include, or include_once statements that your plugins use.

The article then starts in by listing the things you'll need to have installed and working to follow along. It then talks about what they're going to help you build - a simple plugin that adds an "Inspirational quotes" widget to your post editor page. They walk you through the basic setup of the plugin, adding the box to the page and setting up the "questions.txt" file to pull the quotes from. Code is provided for each step including the creation of the "quote reader" class and the class to display the meta box.

tagged: namespace autoload wordpress plugin introduction part1 series quotes

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-part-1--cms-27157

TutsPlus.com:
Internationalizing WordPress Projects: Updates With WordPress 4.6
Oct 13, 2016 @ 12:07:47

TutsPlus.com has posted the latest in their "Internationalizing WordPress" series today, focusing on some of the changes that have come with the release of WordPress 4.6.

Throughout this series, we've covered exactly what you need to do to internationalize your WordPress projects. If you've not read any of the previous posts, I recommend checking them out.

Though there have been some changes to how internationalization and localization work in WordPress 4.6, that doesn't mean the previous tutorials are irrelevant. It just means that the way you opt to distribute your plugins and their localizations will change.

And that's what we're going to be covering in this tutorial.

You'll need to be caught up on the series before following along with this article. It defines some of the basics and gets your WordPress install in a certain state. Then they get into the changes with the WordPress update including a brief overview of how the internationalization and localization functionality now works and the idea of "just-in-time" translations.

tagged: wordpress update internnationalization localization version

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/internationalizing-wordpress-projects-updates-with-wordpress-46--cms-27155

TutsPlus.com:
Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1
Sep 23, 2016 @ 10:33:58

TutsPlus.com has started off a new series of posts for the WordPress users out there showing you how to build a "welcome page" for your WordPress site and product.

In the first two articles of this series, I wrote about what welcome pages are and how they are helping products improve user experience by connecting the dots, after which I wrote about the WordPress Transients API that I intend to use while building the welcome page.

Coding a welcome page for your WordPress plugin can be a tricky process. The entire concept revolves around redirecting users to a particular page via setting transients and finally deleting them. Let's start building the welcome page.

They walk you through the creation of a simple plugin that can be used to easily create (and re-create) these "welcome" pages (the final result is here for the impatient). The tutorial the starts off by defining the architecture of the plugin and the workflow that it will follow to generate the page. From there it gets into the code for the plugin itself and related supporting files including the "initializer" that activates the plugin, making it ready for use.

tagged: welcome page wordpress plugin series part1 tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/articles/building-a-welcome-page-for-your-wordpress-product-code-part-1--cms-26014

Laravel News:
How to use WordPress as a backend for a Laravel Application
Aug 17, 2016 @ 12:51:08

The Laravel News site has posted an interesting tutorial where they describe the use of WordPress as a backend for a Laravel application. This setup is based on the Laravel News' own experience with it in the recent refactoring of the site.

Last week I relaunched Laravel News, and the new site is running on Laravel with WordPress as the backend. I’ve been using WordPress for the past two years, and I’ve grown to enjoy the features that it provides. The publishing experience, the media manager, the mobile app, and Jetpack for tracking stats.

I wasn’t ready to give these features up, and I didn’t have the time to build my own system, so I decided to keep WordPress and just use an API plugin to pull all the content I needed out, then store it in my Laravel application. In this tutorial, I wanted to outline how I set it all up.

While he did find other methods for linking the two, they didn't quite fit with what he wanted so he worked up his own. The content is then synced via a recurring task pulling over posts, categories and tags. He gets into the WordPress REST API first, showing the extraction of the posts from the API and pushing them into a Laravel collection. There's also an example of how to sync a post with the database (API) and how to create a new post in a similar way. Also included is the code to get the featured image, get the category for a post and sync the tag values. The tutorial finishes with the code for the sync command and pushing it into the scheduler.

tagged: wordpress backend laravel application tutorial rest api

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/08/wordpress-api-with-laravel/