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NetTuts.com:
Understanding and Working with Relationships Between Data in WordPress
August 01, 2014 @ 09:21:54

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series looking at the "guts" of a typical WordPress installation. In the first part they gave an overview of the structure and contents of the various database tables. In this second part they get more into the relationships between them.

In the first part of this series on data in WordPress, I gave an overview of the WordPress database tables, and which tables are used to store what kind of data. In this second part, I'll outline how WordPress manages the relationships between that data. As you'll see, WordPress uses three kinds of data relationship - one-to-one, one-to-many and many-to-many. I'll look at each of these and what they mean for your WordPress site.

He goes through each of the relationship types and includes examples from the WordPress database to illustrate them. He then gets into a bit more depth, talking about the specifics of some relationships like: posts-to-users, posts-to-comments, comment-to-comment and the structure of the many-to-many relationships too.

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wordpress series data database relationship tutorial part2

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-and-working-with-relationships-between-data-in-wordpress--cms-20632

Kinsta.com:
Real-World WordPress Benchmarks with PHP5.5 PHP5.6 PHP-NG and HHVM
July 30, 2014 @ 12:26:51

The Kinsta.com blog has a new post with the results of some benchmarking they've done around WordPress comparing PHP 5.5, PHP 5.6 (PHPNG) and HHVM in response time (well, time taken for the request).

If you remember we wrote an article a good couple of months ago when WordPress 3.9 came out that HHVM was fully supported beginning with that release, and we were all happy about it. The initial benchmark results showed HHVM to be far more superior than the Zend engine that's currently powering all PHP builds.

[...] Obviously you have to compromise based on your (or rather your sites') needs but is it worth it? How much of a performance gain can you expect by switching to HHVM? [...] Today I finally took the time to set up a test environment and do some tests to compare a couple of different builds with a fresh out of the box WordPress install and one that has a bunch of content added plus runs WooCommerce!

The testing was all done locally on virtual machines (using Vagrant setups) and two different kinds of test WordPress installations. They share the results in the post, showing the differences between the HHVM installations and the plain PHP ones. The results also show the differences between having the opcode cache on and off. Curious to see how it would perform outside of a local system, they also pushed the same configurations out to a DigitalOcean instance with some slightly different results.

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wordpress benchmark php55 php56 phpng hhvm compare results

Link: https://kinsta.com/blog/real-world-wordpress-benchmarks-with-php5-5-php5-6-php-ng-and-hhvm/

NetTuts.com:
Understanding and Working with Data in WordPress
July 29, 2014 @ 11:28:05

On NetTuts.com there's a new post for those new to WordPress (or just wanting to figure out more about the internals of the tool) showing how some of the data is structured and how to work with it.

Most WordPress users never come into direct contact with the database and may not even be aware that it's constantly working to populate their site. When WordPress serves up any kind of page, be that the home page, a single post or page or an archive, it's accessing the database to bring up content that editors and administrators have added to the site. In this series of tutorials I'll look in detail at different aspects of the WordPress database.

This post is the first in the series and provides an overview of the database and what kinds of information each one contains. They talk about content types and provide the table structure and relations in a handy graphical form (an ERD). They then go through each of the tables and describe what the data is including link tables, joining the content in different places.

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data wordpress introduction database table erd overview

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-and-working-with-data-in-wordpress--cms-20567

NetTuts.com:
More Tips for Best Practices in WordPress Development
July 25, 2014 @ 09:18:09

NetTuts.com has published a few more WordPress tips and best practices to help you get the most out of your WordPress-based application.

Welcome to the second part of the series. In the first article, we explained the WordPress Coding Standards, how to avoid namespaces collisions, comments in the code, and some basic security tips. Today, we are going to go a bit deeper and write some more code and learn some techniques to improve performance and security of our plugins.

They look specifically at when you should include your scripts and styles, formatting Ajax calls and working with filters and actions. Code snippets are included with each point with links to some other resources for some of the topics to provide more information.

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wordpress bestpractices development ajax scripts styles filters actions

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/more-tips-for-best-practices-in-wordpress-development--cms-21013

NetTuts.com:
Running WordPress on OpenShift Part2
July 14, 2014 @ 13:22:52

NetTuts.com has posted the second part of their series about getting WordPress up and running on a RedHat OpenShift cloud instance. In part one of the series they looked at OpenShift as a whole and created the initial application. This part focuses more on setting up the right environment and getting WordPress installed using their rhc client tool.

In this tutorial, we will dive deeply into OpenShift to understand the custom build and deployment process. We will also learn the command-line tool for logging and troubleshooting when our application is down. [...] We did almost all of those tasks using the web interface which is great and very convenient; however, in addition to the dashboard, OpenShift offers a powerful client tool call rhc client.

They guide you through the installation of the command-line client (rhc) as a Ruby gem and include the results of the "help" command. They include example commands showing how to: ssh into the instance, deploy the application and add more functionality to prepare for the WordPress install. There's also some information about environment variables and creating a custom build process to deploy WordPress correctly.

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openshift tutorial install configure wordpress environment commandline

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/running-wordpress-on-openshift-part2--cms-19947

NetTuts.com:
How To Display Post Meta Data on a WordPress Post
July 11, 2014 @ 10:44:41

NetTuts.com has a a recent tutorial showing you how to show the metadata from a posting in WordPress right along with the other post data.

During the course of the series, one of the things that we did in order to help demonstrate the object-oriented principles as well as some of the features of the WordPress API was build a plugin. Specifically, we built a plugin that allowed us to view all of the post meta data associated with a given post within the WordPress dashboard. [...] Since that particular post was written, I've received a number of different questions one of which has been how do we take the data displayed in the dashboard - that is, the post meta data - and display it on the front end of the web site. In this article, we're going to take a look at extending the plugin such that we can display the data on a single post page.

To display the data, they actually extend the plugin they've already made. They start with some of the issues of this method (and the data itself) that you might run into during the development. They create a "public" directory to store the cached metadata in and a manager class to handle the functionality. The class loads the data and uses output buffering to capture the data. A public hook is defined to call the "display" action on each page load and the results are passed out to the view.

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wordpress metadata plugin extend tutorial action

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-display-post-meta-data-on-a-wordpress-post--cms-21658

Envato:
The Future of WordPress
July 10, 2014 @ 13:14:07

On the Envato blog there's a recent post that covers some of the future of WordPress resulting from some discussions at a recent Future of WordPress panel from the WP Think Tank.

There's one thing that we can all agree on: the future of WordPress is bright. Outside of this, the ever-passionate WordPress community is a hotbed for debates on where WordPress should go from here. With 22% of websites running on WordPress, a vibrant open-source community, amazing themes and plugins and a developer-friendly mindset, WordPress is stronger today than it has ever been. So what's next?

Their list includes changes touching just about all parts of the application including plenty of UI updates, a continued focus on backwards compatibility a shift towards plugin-driven development. This would allow new features to be installed as plugins when they're ready rather than modifying the core package. There's also some emphasis being put on making it work for "more than just blogging" and push towards more enterprise-level acceptance.

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future wordpress blogging platform enhancement architecture

Link: http://inside.envato.com/the-future-of-wordpress/

NetTuts.com:
Running WordPress on OpenShift An Introduction
July 09, 2014 @ 11:07:47

On the NetTuts site today there's a new tutorial that wants to help you get WordPress installed on OpenShift, the platform-as-a-service offering from RedHat that includes full PHP support.

OpenShift is a very good platform for running a WordPress site. PagodaBox and AppFog fair for hosting PHP applications for free; however, PagodaBox is quite slow, and has a hard limit of 10MB of MySQL for free plan. AppFog no longer supports custom domain on their free plan. You can also run PHP on Heroku, but it's a bit on the slow, as well. OpenShift solves all of above problems: It's fast enough, offers a free custom domain, offers large disk space, and a significant amount of MySQL storage.

They start by introducing some of the features OpenShift offers and the basics of what it includes in the free plans. They then walk you through the full process to getting an account set up and creating the environment for the WordPress install:

  • Sign Up for an Account
  • Setup Your Publish Key
  • Get Your WordPress Up (includes code changes if porting an existing installation)
  • Use Your Own Domain
  • Setup phpMyAdmin

They also offer some tips post-installation to help keep things up and running (monitored), enabling remote SSH access and using SFTP to connect to the application if there's a need.

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openshift tutorial install configure wordpress paas

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/running-wordpress-on-openshift-an-introduction--cms-20058

SitePoint WordPress Blog:
Speed Up Your WordPress Site
July 08, 2014 @ 10:08:34

Some advice has been posted over on the SitePoint WordPress blog with some tips for speeding up the performance of your WordPress site using both internal changes and some outside testing tools.

As one of the top user experience factors, website performance is more important than ever. Website speed and performance on mobile devices is particularly important, with a rapidly growing number of visitors accessing the web via smartphones and tablets. While WordPress is very easy to get up and running, making your site speedy requires a bit more work, and is an ongoing process. In this article we'll cover why speed matters, and offer some practical advice for how to speed up WordPress. Improving performance takes a lot of trial and error, but it's great fun!

They start the post with a few reasons why speed matters to your application and its users (including higher conversion rates). The show you how to run a basic speed test using the Google PageSpeed Insights and profiling the performance using the P3 (Plugin Performance Profiler). The post then gets into some of the factors that make an impact on your site's performance including the hosting provider configuration, choice of theme and number of plugins. They recommend some simple steps like minifying assets, caching or using CDNs to host the assets and make their load faster.

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wordpress speed performance tips

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/speed-wordpress/

NetTuts.com:
How to Use New Relic With PHP & WordPress
April 15, 2014 @ 11:43:04

The NetTuts.com Code blog has posted the second part of their series showing how to use the New Relic monitoring service in various kinds of web applications. In the previous article they looked at using it in a Ruby application, but in this new post it's all about PHP.

Today, we will look at how to monitor a PHP application using New Relic. More specifically, we will set up a basic WordPress installation and get some performance data about it, in the New Relic dashboards. [...] With the PHP version of the agent, the environment is a lot more important, as the agent is installed and lives on the box where the application will be deployed, rather than being part of any particular app.

They use an EC2 instance for their example, but the steps can be applied on other systems. They help you get the needed software installed, validate they're correctly configured and do a basic setup of WordPress. Next up is the steps to install the New Relic "newrelic-php5" software and get it fully installed. They also include the updates you'll need to make to your Apache configuration to configure the New Relic instance and how to keep the agent up to date.

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newrelic wordpress tutorial configure install

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-use-new-relic-with-php-wordpress--cms-20465


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