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Marc Scholten:
Accidental Complexity Caused By Service Containers In The PHP World
May 24, 2016 @ 11:25:30

In this post to his site Marc Scholten talks about something that's become a side effect of using the inversion of control design pattern in PHP applications (specifically related to dependency injection): added accidental complexity.

Modern PHP development favors the use of inversion of control to keep software more configurable and flexible. This leads to the problem that one now has to create a big graph of objects to use the application. As a solution to avoid redundant setup code, service containers like the symfony2 dependency injection component are used.

The goal of a service container is to centralize the construction of big object graphs. [...] Simple, right? Actually it’s not. Commonly used service containers are complex solution for simple problems.

He illustrates with an example using the Symfony services container, a piece of the framework that allows the definition of dependency relationships via a YAML formatted file. While this configuration seems simple enough, he points out that more complex dependencies (ones that could easier be set via a "set" method) become more difficult to define when limited by the service container config structure. He also points out that it makes static analysis of the code much more difficult with dependencies being dynamically fetched from the container instead of directly related. He offers an alternative to this complex container setup, however: a simple method (or methods) inside of a factory class that creates the objects, injects the required dependencies. This makes it much easier to call from the service container instance and configuration and even a "create container" call to set all of the dependencies up at once. He ends the post with some advantages of this approach and a takeaway or two to keep in mind when managing your object dependencies.

tagged: complexity service container accidental configuration simplex complex example symfony

Link: https://www.mpscholten.de/software-engineering/2016/05/21/accidental-complexity-caused-by-service-containers-in-the-php-world.html

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Programmatic Expressive
May 17, 2016 @ 11:45:34

In this new post to his site Matthew Weier O'Phinney looks at a common misconception there seems to be for people using the Expressive framework from Zend - that their applications should be entirely configuration-driven.

Enrico just returned from phpDay, where he spoke about Expressive and the upcoming Zend Framework 3. One piece of feedback he brought back had to do with how people perceive they should be building Expressive applications: many think, based on our examples, that it's completely configuration driven!

As it turns out, this is far from the truth; we developed our API to mimic that of traditional microframeworks, and then built a configuration layer on top of that to allow making substitutions. However, it's not only possible, but quite fun, to mix and match the two ideas!

Matthew goes on to share an experiment he tried using his own code to "tweak" things away from being configuration-driven to a more programmatic approach. He shares a few tips to remember when trying the same with your application too. The post ends with an example of this migration and some of the benefits/issues that could come from the change.

tagged: programmatic expressive framework configuration migrate example

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2016-05-16-programmatic-expressive.html

Freek Van der Herten:
How to setup and use the Google Calendar API
May 10, 2016 @ 12:10:32

In this new tutorial posted to his site Freek Van der Herten shows you how to connect your application to the Google Calendar API, complete with screenshots for a step-by-step process.

For a project I’m working on I needed to interact with a Google Calendar. I’ve your ever worked with some API’s by Google then you know their documentation can be very confusing. It’s not that they don’t have documentation, but code examples of common use cases are simply not present. You must wade through a lot of pages to learn basic things such as how to make an authorized request let alone how to fetch calendar events. In this post I’d like to explain in a human readable way how setup and use the Google Calendar API.

He starts on the Google side with the setup of the application and getting the credentials you'll need for the connection. Next up is setting up the calendar itself and the permissions to allow access to all event information. The post then finishes with a PHP example using the "google/apiclient" library to make the Calendar connection and get all events currently on the calendar. As a bonus he also points out a library he's creating to make it easier to work with events in Laravel-based applications.

tagged: google calendar tutorial api setup configuration connection

Link: https://murze.be/2016/05/how-to-setup-and-use-the-google-calendar-api/

Symfony Finland:
Using Symfony Finder and YAML components to transform Drupal 8 configurations to eZ
May 10, 2016 @ 10:58:31

On the Symfony Finland blog there's a tutorial posted showing how to translate Drupal 8 configurations into ones for eZ Platform using a bit of code inside a Symfony command.

Bolt CMS, Drupal 8 and eZ Platform all content management systems that use Symfony in one form or another. All of them use YAML to store configurations of content types and other system properties. This is great as it makes transferring between different formats quite straightforward.

This could be done by hand, but ideally configurations can be converted programatically. In this article we'll take a look at how to transfer content types from Drupal 8 to eZ Platform using a standard Symfony Command.

He starts with some background about the two configuration types (Drupal 8 and eZ Platform) before getting to the actual code to make the transformation. The code translates the Drupal 8 configurations over to the Kaliop Migrations format that can then be used in various environments. They include an example of the resulting configuration structure and, finally, the code to make the translation (allowing for multiple object types too).

tagged: symfony finder yaml component transform druapl8 configuration ezplatform

Link: https://www.symfony.fi/entry/using-symfony-finder-and-yaml-to-transform-drupal-8-configurations-to-ez-platform

Liip Blog:
Using the new Drupal 8 Migration API / Module
May 06, 2016 @ 10:14:23

On the Liip blog there's a post from Jon Minder talking about the new Drupal 8 migration API/module and includes a guide to get you started using it in your Drupal application.

We at Liip AG believe, that the migration API is the best and most efficient way to import data into Drupal. [...] The Migrate 8 module in core is only an API. There is no user interface. This makes it difficult for new developer to start with Migrate 8.

I suggest you, to install the [several] extension modules right away before you start developing if you want to realize the full potential of migrate.

The post starts with a list of reasons they see to use the migration module over other methods including the fact that it's sponsored and supported by Acquia. He provides a list of modules to install before getting started with Migrate and links to a GitHub repository if you'd like a "quickstart" environment to follow his examples. He then compares the previous version (from Drupal 7) of the migration handling with the newer Drupal 8 functionality, most notably the change over to YAML configuration rather than PHP code. He helps you understand the structure of these files and gives an example. He shows how to run the migration, gives a more advanced JSON source example and mentions the included process plugin.

tagged: drupal8 migrate module api drupal7 example yaml configuration

Link: https://blog.liip.ch/archive/2016/05/04/using-the-new-drupal-8-migration-api-module.html

TutsPlus.com:
Deploy Your PHP Application With Rocketeer
May 04, 2016 @ 14:19:01

On the TutsPlus.com site there's a new tutorial posted that aims to help you deploy your PHP application with Rocketeer, a PHP-based deployment tool with lots of built in functionality for more complex deployments.

There used to be a time when PHP developers had to use deployment tools that were aimed at general web applications. [...] But nowadays, we're blessed with a few deployment tools written in our language that enable deeper integration. One of these tools is Rocketeer, a tool that takes inspiration from Capistrano and the Laravel framework.

Rocketeer is a modern tool that brings a great approach for your deployment needs. That is to run tasks and manage your application across different environments and servers.

They start with a brief introduction to the Rocketeer tool (basically a SSH driven command execution engine) and show you how to get it installed on your system. They then help you initialize the setup directory (.rocketeer) and describe each of the pieces and how the deployment happens. They show you how to configure events and tasks in the system to perform during execution. They also show the definition of "strategies" to execution events/tasks in groups, work with plugins and, finally, running an example deployment.

tagged: rocketeer deployment tool introduction configuration example

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/deploy-your-php-application-with-rocketeer--cms-25838

Leonid Mamchenkov:
Adventure in composer private repositories
Apr 22, 2016 @ 09:19:44

In this new post to his site Leonid Mamchenkov talks about some of his "adventure with Composer private repositories" in some of his deployment work with CakePHP 3 applications.

As good as the Packagist is, there is often a need for a repository or a package elsewhere. Whether it’s a commercial library, or sensitive corporate code, having an ability to store it outside of public eye and handle with the same ease and the same tool as the rest of the dependencies is a very welcome feature.

[...] We are setting up similar development and deployment process, but now for CakePHP-based projects. Things are much easier, since CakePHP 3 natively supports composer for the application itself and for its plugins. But we still have the need for private repositories here and there, so we follow the same setup as we did for WordPress.

Unfortunately he was getting a RuntimeException when he was trying to pull in a plugin through the same private repository workflow. Not only had he not seen the error before but the autoloader was configured as defined and other plugins were working with the same structure. As it turns out, it was the composer.json of the main application repository that was the problem. He includes the fix he made to the configuration on a sample CakePHP 3 project, showing how to switch it to a "vcs" type for more correct handling.

tagged: composer private repository issue runtime exception composerjson configuration

Link: http://mamchenkov.net/wordpress/2016/04/21/adventure-in-composer-private-repositories/

Loïc Faugeron:
Super Speed Symfony - nginx
Apr 20, 2016 @ 10:48:49

Loïc Faugeron has continued his series about speeding up Symfony applications and getting the best overall performance you can. In this new post he gets into more detail about tuning a Nginx web server (with PHP-FPM) and the web server's own caching features.

HTTP frameworks, such as Symfony, allow us to build applications that have the potential to achieve Super Speed.

We've already seen a first way to do so (by turning it into a HTTP server), another way would be to put a reverse proxy in front of it. In this article we'll take a Symfony application and demonstrate how to do so using nginx.

He starts by helping you get Nginx and PHP-FPM all set up and running on a Unix-based system (installed via apt-get). He provides a simple configuration including the user to run as and a virtual host for the application. There's a few command line checks to ensure it's working correctly and a bit of benchmarking as a baseline for the performance testing later. He then gets to the caching functionality and gives some of the basics on how it works inside of Nginx itself. He includes a basic caching configuration (caching to files) and adding this to the already created virtual host. Finally he includes sample Symfony code to send the "Cache-Control" header with every request and runs the benchmarks again (resulting in about 140x faster than without the cache).

tagged: tutorial nginx performance symfony speed phpfpm setup configuration cache cachecontrol

Link: https://gnugat.github.io/2016/04/20/super-speed-sf-nginx.html

CloudWays Blog:
Using Memcached With PHP
Apr 13, 2016 @ 13:48:10

On the Cloudways blog they have a new tutorial posted showing you how to use memcached with PHP to help improve the overall performance of your application through cached data.

Memcached is a distributed memory caching system. It speeds up websites having large dynamic databasing by storing database object in Dynamic Memory to reduce the pressure on a server whenever an external data source requests a read. A memcached layer reduces the number of times database requests are made.

[..] Why Memcached? It increases the response time of your web pages, which in return enhances the overall customer’s experience. A better response time allows users to fetch data seamlessly.

He starts by ensuring that you already have a memcached instance up and running (it's external to PHP). They suggest using their own Cloudways setup, but it's relatively easy to install with packages on most Linux distributions. With that verified, he shows how to check for memchace functionality in your PHP installation and provides a bit of code to create a connection. Next is an example showing how to pull information from a MySQL database and push that data directly into the waiting memcache server via a set method call. It also includes a get example, showing if the caching was a success or not.

tagged: memcached caching tutorial introduction server configuration example

Link: http://www.cloudways.com/blog/memcached-with-php/

Adam Culp:
Setting up step debugging in Zend Studio
Apr 11, 2016 @ 11:52:43

Adam Culp has posted a guide on his site showing you how to set up debugging in Zend Studio, the PHP IDE from Zend. In it he walks you through the setup on both the server and client side to get them working happily together.

Recently I was helping someone set up step debugging in Zend Studio, and had some difficulties. Therefore I decided to create a blog post to remind me later, and perhaps help others get it set up.

I was doing this on an Ubuntu laptop, so while menus may vary slightly the process should be very similar. Also, I did this using a local virtual machine in VirtualBox, but using Bridged networking mode to simulate a remote server. In Zend Studio I had a project created with the Zend Framework Skeleton Application, and created a virtualhost in the virtual environment that mirrored that.

He starts with the server, pointing out that the only thing really needed there is an installed and working version of Xdebug. He then goes through each step in the IDE, complete with screenshots:

  • Configuring the server in the Preferences
  • Testing the connection between the two
  • Enabling debugging on the project
  • Ensuring the server is configured correctly to use debugging when specified

While some of his instructions are more specific to a Zend Server installation, they can still be mostly applied to any kind of system. You can also check the Xdebug documentation for additional help.

tagged: debugging zendstudio guide zendserver configuration testing xdebug

Link: http://www.geekyboy.com/archives/1220