Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Freek Van der Herten:
Packages that make developing Laravel apps easier
Feb 13, 2017 @ 09:46:12

Freek Van der Herten has a new post to his site sharing what he considers some of the most helpful Laravel package to help with your debugging.

In this post I’d like to share some of the packages that make developing a Laravel app easier.

His list of packages includes a wide range of testing tools like:

For each item on his list he includes a screenshot of it in action (either of a terminal or a UI) and a brief explanation of how it can help.

tagged: framework help debugging package laravel development

Link: https://murze.be/2017/02/packages-make-developing-laravel-apps-easier/

Robert Basic:
Current Vim setup for PHP development
Feb 10, 2017 @ 11:46:10

For those out there always interested in how other developers have their development environment, Robert Basic has some info on his own setup that might interest you. In this new post to his site he shares his configuration using the Vim editor when writing PHP code.

I made some changes to my Vim setup for PHP development recently, so it’s time to write it all down. I’m more than sure that I’ll break it soon and won’t be able to remember all the things I did to have the current setup.

Some new plugins popped up on my radar, I tweaked some older plugins and I even wrote one for PHPStan!

He starts with the improvements in tag support he's found recently using the Gutentags plugin. He also covers other tools and functionality like:

  • Jump to definition
  • (Getting the ) current PHP class and method
  • PHP namespaces
  • Linting
  • A promising completion engine for PHP
  • PHPStan in Vim
  • Debugging

He finishes up the post with a few other helpful supporting plugins for indenting, searching and argument swapping.

tagged: vim editor setup development plugin programming

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/current-vim-setup-for-php-development/

Master Zend Framework:
How To Do RAD Prototyping and Development With The ReflectionBasedAbstractFac
Feb 09, 2017 @ 20:55:47

The Master Zend Framework site has posted a new tutorial showing you how to [use the ReflectionBasedAbstractFactory for prototyping](How To Do RAD Prototyping and Development With The ReflectionBasedAbstractFactory) and development in a Zend Framework 2 application.

Rapid application development isn't normally associated with Zend Framework. That's considered Laravel's domain. But thanks to the ReflectionBasedAbstractFactory, prototyping and rapid application development is now just as easy in Zend Framework as it is in Laravel. In today's tutorial, I'm going to show you how.

When using Zend ServiceManager, it's quite common to create a factory class for any class which require constructor dependencies. While tedious, it ensures we both follow development best practices and that the code we create is fully testable.

However, if we're not careful, it can lead to an enormous amount of factories — perhaps where we have one factory for every class. Needless to say, that can seriously hurt development. There needs to be a better way. And there is!

The ReflectionBasedAbstractFactory is included in the 3.2.0 release of Zend ServiceManager and makes use of the Reflection API to do some automagic, handy things. The article starts with some reasons why you might use it and a brief look at how it works. It also points out that, despite how it makes things easier on the developer it's "not for production" and instead relying on the other configuration handlers to help out.

tagged: zendframework2 rapid development prototype reflectionbasedabstractfactory tutorial

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/rad-prototyping-and-development-with-reflectionbasedabstractfactory/

Stovepipe Systems:
Rethinking Form Development
Dec 19, 2016 @ 11:50:08

On the Stovepipe Systems blog Iltar van der Berg shares some thoughts about rethinking form development and how moving from composition over inheritance model can help make working with Symfony forms easier.

In one of my previous blog posts, Avoiding Entities in Forms, I've shown how to decouple your forms from your entities. Afterwards I got feedback and most of it was about the lack of examples and the flow, when to fill your data and how to get this back in the entity. However, often I notice that developers design forms based on their entities. This can lead to complex forms because you're confined to a strict set of properties. Developers often get struck with unmapped fields and form events to work their way around those limitations.

With Symfony Forms I highly recommend to follow the composition over inheritance principle. Small form types are easier to re-use and make it less complex to build forms. Moreover, this allows small data objects to have specific goals with validation for their specific case, rather than complex validation groups.

He starts with an example user story, defining a need for a form that allows users to post comments on blog posts. He starts on this simple form, defining the "bare minimum" the form requires and creating a class/entity to match. He then talks about what happens when the business need changes and they want a checkbox too. Since he created the form based on the "composition" idea (not defined by the database structure) he could pretty easily update it with this new field and add a bit of extra handling.

tagged: form development tutorial composition inheritance tutorial

Link: https://stovepipe.systems/post/rethinking-form-development

Andreas Creten:
Does code need to be perfect?
Nov 11, 2016 @ 09:55:57

On his Medium.com blog Andreas Creten has written up a post that tries to answer the question "Does code need to be perfect?" As developers we have a drive to take pride in our work and want it to be the best code possible. However, that can lead to some bad practices...

In the past months I have asked myself a lot why we always strive to write perfect code. Picking up coding again for an internal project made me realise our team (and probably a large part of the rest of the software development world) spend a lot of time on writing perfectly formatted, ordered, patterned and tested code. But is this really necessary?

[...] The engineers want to write perfect code using the latest techniques, make sure that the code is well documented so they can fully understand how everything works and that it has tests so they can easily update things later. Product owners on the other hand just want things to be done, fast and cheap, so they can ship new features or convince new clients. How can you make these conflicting views work together?

He offers a few different suggestions for those developers wanting to craft the perfect codebase including coding for "now" not the future and the fact that "perfect code" just doesn't exist. He offers some suggestions for dealing with that "non-perfect code" you come across in your codebase, when starting from scratch makes sense and thinking about how "perfect" the code needs to be at the outset.

tagged: perfect code opinion development practices

Link: https://medium.com/we-are-madewithlove/does-code-need-to-be-perfect-a53f36ad7163#.jdqre42fu

PHP Roundtable:
056: Hourly vs Value-Based Pricing
Nov 10, 2016 @ 10:56:50

The PHP Roundtable podcast, hosted by Sammy Powers, has posted its latest episode. In this new show he's joined by Keith Casey, Tim Lytle and Mike McDerment to talk about hourly versus value based pricing when charging for freelance development work.

There are two seemingly contradicting philosophies about how to charge clients for programming work. The hourly camp suggests that the client is paying for your skill and hiring you for your time. The value-based pricing camp suggests that the programmer should price a project based on its value to the client instead of the hours it will take to build it. Today we chat about these two ideas and discuss the pros and cons of both.

You can catch this latest episode either using the in-page audio or video player or by watching the live recording directly over on YouTube. If you enjoy the show and want to see more like it, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for information about the most recent and upcoming shows (and live recordings).

tagged: phproundtable podcast video ep56 hourly value pricing development work

Link: https://www.phproundtable.com/episode/hourly-vs-value-based-pricing

PHP Roundtable:
055: Acceptance Testing with Behat
Nov 08, 2016 @ 11:56:10

The PHP Rountable podcast has posted its latest episode featuring a discussion about Behat and acceptance testing in your PHP applications. This time host Sammy Powers is joined by Jessica Mauerhan and Konstantin Kudryashov.

We chat about the open-source Behavior-Driven Development framework called Behat. We get a brief overview of how Behat can help us write more reliable code and also explore some best-practices when writing automated tests.

You can catch this episode in a few different ways - either using the in-page audio or video player or you can watch the live recording (Google Hangout) directly over on YouTube. If you enjoy the show be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates when new shows are released and when the next shows will be recorded.

tagged: phproundtable podcast video behat acceptance testing behaviordriven development

Link: https://www.phproundtable.com/episode/acceptance-testing-with-behat

Laravel News:
Can you be an expert developer in 10,000 hours?
Oct 26, 2016 @ 09:32:48

On the Laravel News site there's a new post that tries to answer the question "can you be a an expert developer in 10,000 hours?" This is based on some prior research (not specific to programming) that anyone can be an expert on anything in about 10 thousand hours worth of work and study on the subject. This post takes the ideas presented there and applies them to the world of development, trying to see if there's a good match.

Back in 1993, psychologists K. Anders Ericsson, Ralf Th. Krampe, and Clemens Tesch-Romer said that 10,000 hours of deliberate practice of a specific skill will make one an expert. Fast forward 15 years, and Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers made the 10,000 hours rule famous. And in 2012, Macklemore solidified it’s fact status: it officially takes 10,000 hours to be an expert at anything.

How does this rule correlate to coding? If you’ve been working full time as a dev for five years, you’d be considered an expert by the parameters of the rule. [...] The problem with the 10,000 hours rule to excellence is that most domains aren’t static.

The article goes on to talk about the ever-changing world of technology (as compared to static activities where the rules aren't going to change). They talk about the Laravel framework and how it has evolved since beta/version 1 and how, if the 10k rule is applied, no one is an "expert" as it changes so fast. There's also a link to a study that debunked the 10k rule and so they shift to trying to answer another question: how much does it take to be just considered "good"? This is related back to software engineering and where in the process could it be that you move from "good" to "great".

Maybe the real question here is instead of trying to be an expert software developer, what aspects of your job can you improve in 20 hours of practice? Maybe the focus shouldn’t just be on the code; after all, your job is more than just staring at glowing screens all day. Identifying specific areas of weakness that you can devote time to strengthening every week may be the key to becoming that expert that you desire to be.
tagged: expert developer good tenthousand hours development opinion

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/10/10000-hours/

PHP.net:
PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 4 Released
Oct 19, 2016 @ 10:10:29

The PHP.net site has posted an official announcement about the release of the latest Release Candidate in the PHP 7.1.x series: PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 4:

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 4. This release is the fourth release candidate for 7.1.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system. [...] The fifth release candidate will be released on the 27th of October. You can also read the full list of planned releases on [our wiki](https://wiki.php.net/todo/php71).

As usually for Release Candidates you can grab the latest test build from this QA site (for source) and the windows.php.net QA site for the binaries. You can find out more about what's changed in this RC in the NEWS file and start walking through the upgrade to PHP 7.1.0 when it's released using the upgrade guide.

Reminder, this is a development preview not a stable release so do not use it in production!

tagged: language releasecandidate php71rc4 development preview

Link: http://php.net/index.php#id2016-10-19-1

Full Stack Radio:
52: Taylor Otwell - Patterns for Simplifying Laravel Applications
Oct 18, 2016 @ 09:38:05

The Full Stack Radio podcast, hosted by Adam Wathan, has posted their latest episode - an interview with Taylor Otwell, creator and lead developer on the Laravel (and most of the projects in its ecosystem).

In this episode, Adam and Taylor Otwell have a discussion about strategies they use to write cleaner, simpler code when working with the Laravel framework.

They talk about several of the other packages/products in the Laravel ecosystem (like Valet, Spark and Passport) as well as some of Taylor's thoughts on simplifying code including a few other links to presentations and tutorials on the same topics. You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates on when new episodes are released.

tagged: fullstackradio taylorotwell laravel simplify patterns development podcast ep52

Link: http://www.fullstackradio.com/52