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Delicious Brains Blog:
Debugging JavaScript and PHP at the same time with PhpStorm
Feb 16, 2017 @ 11:14:20

The Delicious Brains site has a tutorial posted from author Peter Tasker showing you how to debug Javascript and PHP at the same time directly in your PHPStorm IDE.

Since I started with Delicious Brains last July, I’ve become a big fan of PhpStorm. It really is the bee’s knees. I won’t go over the full list of features, but some of the things I find helpful daily are: Cmd+clicking into method definitions, VCS integration and color highlighting of code changes, code bookmarks, and of course, Xdebug integration

In this post I want to expand on what Iain already covered with PhpStorm and Xdebug and show you how to level up your JavaScript debugging skills with PhpStorm.

The tutorial starts with a section explaining why using the PHPStorm debugger could be more beneficial and provide a more integrated workflow. It then starts in on the setup, showing how to set up the extension for Chrome so that it can talk to the IDE for the Javascript side complete with screenshots (and screencasts). With the two integrated the next step is to add a breakpoint in the code and what the results look like when it's executed and thrown.

The post finishes up covering the integration of the debugger with Xdebug allowing for the complete debugging of your application in one place.

tagged: debug javascript phpstorm integration tutorial xdebug

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/debugging-php-javascript-phpstorm/

James Cowie:
All hail Xdebug and lets let var dump die
Jan 12, 2017 @ 12:58:23

In a recent post to his site James Cowie sings the praises of Xdebug for debugging and says that "var_dump must die" as a method for debugging in your application development flow.

How many times have you been working in Magento or any other php application and hit an error, exception or something not quite right? For me a lot. I’ve been that developer that debugs by fire and throws echo var_dumps and dies around like a western gunslinger. It’s easy, provides quick feedback cycles but lets be honest its lazy, in efficient, rarely provides all of the data you need to solve the problem on the first try and its not something you want to boast about by the coffee machine.

[...] So whats the “better” way of debugging a application? Well welcome Xdebug + PHPStorm. Imagine inside of the IDE we can set a breakpoint, a fancy die and reload our web page. Magically the IDE has stopped execution and we can see the state of the application at that exact path. We can see the variables and we can step through the code and see exactly what class and method is called next and so on and so forth.

While his instructions are specific to PHPStorm, most major IDEs will have a similar setup process with their own tweaks. In his case, though, he has one more layer of complexity - the PHP is executing inside a Docker container. He walks you through the process he followed to get the flow from container to local IDE set up. He wraps up the post with an example of debugging a script and what the results look like inside of PHPStorm (including a screencast).

tagged: xdebug vardump phpstorm docker container tutorial

Link: http://jamescowie.me/blog/2016/12/all-hail-xdebug-and-lets-let-var-dump-die/

Derick Rethans:
Good Bye PHP 5
Jan 11, 2017 @ 10:13:53

On his site Derick Rethans has posted an announcement about a major change in the Xdebug project (a widely used PHP debugger) he leads, saying goodby to PHP 5.

A few days ago I merged a patch into on GitHub. Maintaining PHP 5 and PHP 7 support in one code base is not particularly easy, and even more complicated for something like Xdebug, with its deep interactions with PHP's internals.

As PHP 5.6's active support has ended on December 31st, I also felt it no longer needed to support PHP 5 with Xdebug any more. It saves more than 5000 lines of code.

He shares some of the responses to the change (via Tweets) from the community ranging from full support to outcry over the change. He points out that the current version of Xdebug (2.5) will continue to operate on PHP 5 systems but when Xdebug 2.6 rolls around, the 2.5 branch will only receive bugfixes and no new features. You can find out about those upcoming features here.

tagged: xdebug debugging tool php7 php5 upgrade support

Link: https://derickrethans.nl/xdebug-php5.html

Zend Developer Zone:
A Reverse Debugger for PHP…wait…WHAT?
Nov 16, 2016 @ 11:51:28

On the Zend Developer Zone they have a post talking about an interesting project - a reverse debugger for PHP making it simpler to step forward and backwards through breakpoints in your PHP code (instead of just forward).

Honestly, when I originally tweeted this out I really wasn’t 100% sure what it did. You never know when you see things like “reverse debugger”. It’s one of those “I understand the words separately…” type of things. Then I watched the short video. HO-LY CRAP! Seriously, it is exactly what it says, it allows you to step debug forward AND backwards. Well, almost. You have to record the session first and then you can step forwards and backwards. Still it is a powerful tool.

The project, Don'tBug, hooks directly into any IDE that supports XDebug (just about all of them) making it easy to integrate into your current workflow. You can see it in action in this video over on YouTube.

tagged: reverse debugger language tool dontbug project xdebug

Link: https://devzone.zend.com/7400/reverse-debugger-php-wait/

Adam Culp:
Setting up step debugging in Zend Studio
Apr 11, 2016 @ 11:52:43

Adam Culp has posted a guide on his site showing you how to set up debugging in Zend Studio, the PHP IDE from Zend. In it he walks you through the setup on both the server and client side to get them working happily together.

Recently I was helping someone set up step debugging in Zend Studio, and had some difficulties. Therefore I decided to create a blog post to remind me later, and perhaps help others get it set up.

I was doing this on an Ubuntu laptop, so while menus may vary slightly the process should be very similar. Also, I did this using a local virtual machine in VirtualBox, but using Bridged networking mode to simulate a remote server. In Zend Studio I had a project created with the Zend Framework Skeleton Application, and created a virtualhost in the virtual environment that mirrored that.

He starts with the server, pointing out that the only thing really needed there is an installed and working version of Xdebug. He then goes through each step in the IDE, complete with screenshots:

  • Configuring the server in the Preferences
  • Testing the connection between the two
  • Enabling debugging on the project
  • Ensuring the server is configured correctly to use debugging when specified

While some of his instructions are more specific to a Zend Server installation, they can still be mostly applied to any kind of system. You can also check the Xdebug documentation for additional help.

tagged: debugging zendstudio guide zendserver configuration testing xdebug

Link: http://www.geekyboy.com/archives/1220

Andreas Gohr:
Visualizing XDebug Traces
Feb 29, 2016 @ 12:49:44

Andreas Gohr has posted an interesting article to his site showing you how you can easily visualize XDebug stack traces and make them a bit more clear than the usual output dump.

As alluded to in yesterday's post, I'm currently hunting an elusive bug with xdebug. The problem is, that it only happens sporadically and when I know it happened it is too late to set a break point. So usual debugging methods don't work. Instead I want to use xdebug's execution tracing: let it log all function calls and then pick through the log when the bug occurs.

[...] To ease my debugging I looked for tools that could read the computer readable format. I found a few promising candidates, but in the end they either didn't work or they did not provide what I needed. So instead of hunting the bug, I built a tool

His tool takes in the XDebug output and turns it into something much more readable and properly nested.

tagged: tool library nested output trace stack debugging xdebug

Link: http://www.splitbrain.org/blog/2016-02/27-visualizing_xdebug_traces

Joshua Thjissen:
Symfony, Xdebug, and maximum nesting level issues
Nov 18, 2015 @ 10:53:45

In this new post to his site Joshua Thjissen has shared some of his discoveries with Xdebug, Symfony 2 and problems with maximum nesting levels of objects in his testing.

Here you are, developing your code based on the Symfony2 framework. Creating a form here, add a Twig template there, until suddenly, boom! Your site doesn’t work anymore, and all the info you can find in your PHP logs is [an error about the maximum function nesting level being reached.

[...] What just happened? Did I create some kind of recursive function I wasn’t aware of, did somebody commit code that I accidentally pulled? Fortunately for us developers, there is a quick way to deal with this: google it...

According to the information he found via his search it's a common issue and can be "fixed" by bumping up the max_nesting_level to a higher value. He could have stopped there but he wanted to explain why this problem happened, what the nesting is all about, how it relates to the limitations of XDebug and why Twig could cause problems with it.

tagged: symfony2 xdebug maximum nesting level issue stack trace twig

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2015/11/17/symfony-xdebug-and-maximum-nesting-level-issues/

Tideways.io:
Essential Macro Optimizations to Improve PHP Performance
Jul 09, 2015 @ 10:19:16

The Tideways.io blog has posted a set of four macro-optimizations you can do to help improve the overall performance of your application. Note the "macro" here, not "micro", so these are larger, more platform-level changes.

This blog post describes four macro-optimizations for PHP applications that are essential to consider before investigating other possible optimizations. [...] While its fun chasing after small micro optimizations, often it is debatable if the developer time is well spent. After all I/O is the more important bottleneck in almost every application. [...] But its much more efficient to fix the big issues first. The changes I present in this post can be done quickly and their gains can be massive.

The four suggestions he makes cover different areas of a standard application:

  • Upgrade PHP to a recent version
  • Use accelerator such as APC or OPCache
  • Close Session for Writes
  • Don't run XDebug in Production

Each tip comes with a bit of background on why it's a good idea and some have links to other resources supporting the change or update proposed.

tagged: macrooptimization performance application version opcode cache session write xdebug

Link: https://tideways.io/profiler/blog/essential-macro-optimizations-to-improve-php-performance

Gary Hockin:
Debugging PHP Command Line (with PHPStorm and XDebug)
May 07, 2015 @ 11:47:09

Gary Hockin has a recent post showing how you can debug PHP HTTP requests from the command line using PHPStorm and XDebug. These instructions aren't specific to PHPStorm, however. They can be used in any IDE/editor that supports remote XDebug connections.

At PHP North West I had huge difficulties configuring Xdebug and both my PHP and PHP Storm so they play nice in a CLI environment. So here, for others and almost certainly my future self, is how to do it.

He goes through each step of the setup process assuming that you already have the necessary software installed. He shows how to configure XDebug for remote debugging in the ini configuration, setting up PHPStorm to receive the connection and, finally, adding the "XDEBUG_CONFIG" environment variable to tell PHP to relay the requests back to your waiting IDE.

tagged: remote debugging phpstorm commandline xdebug configure setup environment

Link: http://blog.hock.in/2015/05/04/debugging-php-command-line-with-php-storm/

Derick Rethans:
Xdebug 2.3: Profiler File Compression
Apr 14, 2015 @ 09:48:09

Derick Rethans has posted the next part of his series of posts about the latest version of XDebug (v2.3). In this new post he focuses on the profiler and the new ability of it to compress the resulting file.

When making profiling dumps with Xdebug, the file size can not really be ignored. Even with a simple Drupal page a profile file is easily close to 1Mb. For each function call, the file contains the location and name of the calling function, and then a list of functions that have been called.

He gives an example of the uncompressed output from an execution of Drupal, showing the duplicate content when the same method is called more than once. With this new feature, XDebug is smart enough to detect this and make use of name compression to essentially replace duplication with a reference to the previous call to the same bits of code.

tagged: xdebug profiler compression feature release

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/xdebug-2.3-profile-file-compression.html