Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 2)
Aug 11, 2017 @ 10:44:19

Mark Baker has posted the second part of his series covering the use of closures and anonymous classes as an alternative approach to mocking in your unit tests. In part one he introduced some of the basic concepts behind their use and in this latest post he focuses on "different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties".

The last time I posted here, I was writing about Anonymous Functions and how they can be bound to any object (or class) to execute as though they are a method within the scope of that class (Closure Binding as an alternative to “use” variables); and in the first article in this series, I looked at using a Closure to access private and protected properties of an object.

I was going to write this particular article about using simple Anonymous Classes to create test doubles for Unit Testing – and may well return to that topic in a future article in the series – but Matt Brunt has written a good post on that topic already, so instead I’m going to focus on a different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties that we otherwise couldn’t see directly when testing a class.

He goes on to talk about some ideas from the Java ecosystem around nested classes and scoping. He then shows how, with closure binding, the same kind of effect can be created in PHP testing. He includes the code for an example of a class that coverts distance measurements. He then introduces his "SpyMaster" utility class that "infiltrates" the class under test and attaches the closure providing the needed point for testing. He finishes up the post talking about this functionality and how the technique can be used in many places, not just testing class constructors.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part2 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/07/30/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-2/

Sammy Kaye Powers:
Writing tests for PHP source (Series)
Jul 21, 2017 @ 11:21:48

Sammy Kaye Powers has a series of posts over on his site introducing you to testing the PHP language with .phpt tests. So far he's introduced the topic, shown how to run the tests and debugging failing tests.

If you've ever wanted to get involved with PHP internals, writing tests is a great way to get your foot into the door. The tests are written in PHP so you don't even need to know C to get started.

Each of the posts also comes with a screencast, narrated by Sammy, showing the information presented in the tutorial:

There's more to come in the series as he still plans to teach about how to fix current tests and how to eventually create your own. Stay tuned to his site for more tutorials in the series.

tagged: test unittest phpt language source series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://www.sammyk.me/compiling-php-from-source-writing-tests-for-php-source

Cal Evans:
Mautic Step 2 – Cron Jobs
Jul 11, 2017 @ 09:16:40

Cal Evans has posted the second part of his series as he works through the installation and configuration of the Mautic PHP-based marketing automation tool. In this part of the series he focuses on cron jobs.

This time we are talking about the cron jobs necessary to make Mautic run. Mautic has several commands that are necessary to execute that are not web based. They are run from the command line manually (dumb idea) or using a scheduler like cron on Linux. As with my “Installing Mautic” post, this post is only interesting to those of you self-hosting Mautic.

There is a great manual page on this titles “Cron Jobs”. It tells you a lot of what I’ll tell you here. If you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend you start there.

He talks about each of the four jobs that, if you're using the system yourself, will want to run often: one for handling segments, two for campaigns and another for sending messages. He also talks about the main problem he ran into during his work with the cron jobs - permissions issues. He shares how he resolved this issue with an extra line in his crontab (after changing the user they ran as) and ends with some extra advice against wide open permissions.

tagged: mautic series part2 install configure cronjob cron tutorial marketing automation

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2017/07/10/mautic-step-2-cron-jobs/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Hello, Laravel? Communicating with PHP through SMS!
Jun 27, 2017 @ 11:05:29

In a previous article the SitePoint PHP blog showed you how to use Laravel, the Twilio service and some helpful packages to create an application that allowed interaction via phone calls. In this new tutorial they continue the series and update the application to allow interaction via SMS messages.

In this article, we will modify our Laravel-powered phone-capable weather forecast app so that it is accessible via SMS (text message) in addition to the voice telephone system.

They just add on the functionality rather than creating a new application for the SMS side, adding new routes, controller methods and changing up the service layer a bit. It also includes the messaging that comes back from Twilio and how the response needs to be formatted. Finally, the article shows (with screenshots included) how to configure your Twilio application to allow messaging as well as phone calls. The post ends with screenshots of the application on a mobile device sending the requests for the weather information based on the zip code provided.

tagged: tutorial laravel twilio sms weather communication series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/hello-laravel-communicating-php-sms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a Social Network with Laravel and Stream? Easy!
Apr 19, 2017 @ 13:53:03

Christopher Vundi has continued his series covering the integration of Laravel and the Stream service in this new tutorial. In the first post he showed how to add "follow" handling to the application, complete with a real-time stream event when it happens. In this new post he uses some of the same handling to enhance this to a larger "social network" type application.

In the previous post, we saw how to add the follow functionality to a Laravel app. We also looked at how to configure our app to use Stream. This part will focus on: configuring our models in order to make it possible to track activities, the different types of feeds that Stream provides, getting feeds from Stream [and] rendering the different types of feeds in a view.

He starts in with the "activity field" functionality, a base level object that stores each event that happens in the system and is then relayed to Stream. Then, using the included "feed manager" in the Stream package, he shows how to use built-in feeds and add in a custom feed for follow and unfollow events. The tutorial then walks through the output process of the events, handling of the updates from Stream and routing those back out to the waiting news feed on the frontend.

tagged: social network follow event stream streamio service tutorial series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/building-social-network-laravel-stream-easy/

Simon Holywell:
PHP and immutability - part two
Apr 04, 2017 @ 12:54:48

Simon Holywell has continued his series looking at immutability and PHP in part two of his series improving on the code and classes from the previous post.

In the last article we learnt how to create an immutable data structure in PHP. There were a few issues to work through, but we got there in the end. Now onto making the immutable class more useful and easier to create modified copies. Note that these are copies and not modifications, in-place, to the original objects.

He then moves on from the "simple" mutation method previously used (making a new immutable object when a property changes). When the property list starts getting more complex simple single value references no longer scale. He makes use of methods internal to the class to modify the values and return a new immutable instance with the updated value. He shows how to modify this to prevent the setting of unexpected properties and how to expand it out to allow the input of an array of values to update and how to handle required/optional property values.

tagged: immutability series part2 tutorial immutable object

Link: https://www.simonholywell.com/post/2017/04/php-and-immutability-part-two/

AWS Developer Blog:
Automating the Deployment of Encrypted Web Services with the AWS SDK for PHP (Pa
Feb 17, 2017 @ 12:25:48

The Amazon Web Services blog has posted the second part of their series covering the automated deployment of encrypted web services with the AWS SDK. In this new tutorial (part two, part one is here) they continue with the deployment of services: AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon Route 53 and Amazon CloudFront.

In the first post of this series, we focused on how to use Amazon Route 53 for domain registration and use Amazon Certificate Manager (ACM) to create SSL certificates. With our newly registered domain available for use, we can proceed to deploy and configure the services we need to host the www.dev-null.link website across an encrypted connection. Once complete, the infrastructure configuration will reflect the diagrams [included in the post].

The tutorial then walks you through each of the services you need to deploy and shares the code (using the AWS PHP SDK) to show how to automate the process. There's also a few screenshots included of various page results and admin UIs to help you be sure you're in the right place.

tagged: aws amazon deployment encrypted webservice sdk tutorial series part2

Link: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/developer/automating-the-deployment-of-encrypted-web-services-with-the-aws-sdk-for-php-part-2/

Matthias Noback:
Containerizing a static website with Docker (Part 1 & 2)
Jan 06, 2017 @ 09:07:39

Matthias Noback has started a series to his site showing you how to use Docker along with a static site, like one generated with Sculpin to create a complete environment. So far he's posted part one and part two.

Recently a former colleague of mine, Lucas van Lierop, showed me his new website, which he created using Spress. Lucas took two bold moves: he started freelancing, and he open-sourced his website code. This to me was very inspiring. I've been getting up to speed with Docker recently and am planning to do a lot more with it over the coming months, and being able to take a look at the source code of up-to-date projects that use Docker is certainly invaluable.

Taking lots of inspiration from Lucas's codebase, and after several hours of fiddling with configuration files, I can now guide you through the steps it took to containerize my blog (which is the site you're visiting now) and deploy a single container to a production server.

In part one he talks about how his blog is currently set up - based on a "large set of Markdown files" - and using Sculpin to generate the resulting site. He walks through the configuration of the Sculpin installation and how to configure and build the initial container, the "build" container.

In part two he continues the process but creates a "blog" container this time. This container runs the web server itself (nginx) configured as required by the Sculpin formatting.

tagged: container docker static website tutorial series part1 part2

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/categories/Docker/

DeliciousBrains.com:
Scaling Laravel Using AWS Elastic Beanstalk Part 2: Setting up VPC, RDS and Ela
Dec 15, 2016 @ 10:56:06

On the DeliciousBrains.com site they've posted the second part of a series covering the scaling of a Laravel-based application using Elastic Beanstalk (part one is here).

In my last article we decoupled Laravel and got it ready for deployment to the Elastic Beanstalk architecture. However, before we race ahead to actually deploying our code to Elastic Beanstalk we need to do some preparation first. Specifically we need to set up some other AWS services that will be used by our Laravel app. These include: Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) to keep our infrastructure secure, Relational Database Service (RDS) for our MySQL database and ElastiCache for our Redis cache

With these “supporting” services up and running we can finally move on to deploying our Laravel app to Elastic Beanstalk.

They start off by walking you through the creation of the VPC on the AWS services using both public and private subnets. With that in place they move on to the RDS setup, configuring it to host their MySQL database and making a test connection. Finally they set up the ElastiCache instance for the Redis handling finishing out their "supporting services" setup in AWS.

tagged: laravel aws elasticbeanstalk series part2 vpc rds elasticache tutorial

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/scaling-laravel-using-aws-elastic-beanstalk-part-2-setting-up-vpc-rds-elasticache/

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 2
Nov 30, 2016 @ 09:33:08

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next tutorial in their "Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress" series - part two - expanding on the basics presented in the previous part of the series.

In the previous tutorial, we covered a handful of concepts, all of which are going to be necessary to fully understand what we're doing in this tutorial. Specifically, we covered the following topics: object-oriented interfaces, the single responsibility principle, how these look in PHP [and] where we're headed with our plugin.

[...] Ultimately, we won't be writing much code in this tutorial, but we'll be writing some. It is, however, a practical tutorial in that we're performing object-oriented analysis and design. This is a necessary phase for many large-scale projects (and something that should happen for small-scale projects).

First they briefly cover the environment you'll need to follow along (already set up if you followed along with part one). They then get back into the code, evaluating the current state of the custom autoloader and investigating how it can be broken down into a class and a set of methods instead of procedural code. They work through the different functional parts of the autoloader and how to break it down into classes with only one job (the "single responsibility principle"). They end up with the autoloader that uses NamespaceValidator, FileInvestigator and FileRegistry instances to get the job done.

tagged: oop objectoriented wordpress part2 series refactor singleresponsibility principle

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-2--cms-27431