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TutsPlus.com:
Build a React App With a Laravel Back End: Part 2, React
Oct 11, 2017 @ 09:43:49

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the second part of their series covering the creation of a React application with a Laravel backend. In part one of the series they started in on some of the setup for the application. In part two continues down that path and shows how to set up React and integrate it with the Laravel backend.

In the previous tutorial, we developed a Laravel application that responds to API calls. We created routes, a controller, and a model for the simple product listing application. Since it was the controller's job to return a response to the HTTP requests, the view section was entirely skipped.

[...] In this tutorial, we will be shifting our focus towards the front end. The first half of the tutorial is about setting up React in a Laravel environment. I will also introduce you to Laravel Mix (supported by Laravel 5.4 and later), which is an API for compiling assets. In the second half of the tutorial, we will start building a React application from scratch.

The tutorial walks through the the use of the Laravel artisan command to help with some of the setup tasks and the creation of some of the initial templates and Javascript files. Then it starts in on the application itself including the display of product data and functionality to add a new project.

tagged: react application laravel backend tutorial series part2

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/build-a-react-app-with-laravel-backend-part-2-react--cms-29443

Tomas Votruba:
EasyCodingStandard and PHPStan meet 3 Symfony E-Commerce Projects
Oct 09, 2017 @ 12:55:22

Tomas Votruba has a post to his site showing you how to combine EasyCodingStandard and PHPStan on a Symfony-based ecommerce project. This is the second part of a series comparing the code of three popular Symfony ecommerce packages (part one is here).

In the last post, we looked at the static analysis of 3 Symfony E-Commerce projects.

Lines of code, Duplicated code, Cyclomatic complexity or Method length. These metrics are very rarely used in practise (even though there is a sniff for that).

Today, I am going to show you how you can check them with tools that can help you keep your code better on daily basis - EasyCodingStandard and PHPStan.

He's provided the code he used to analyze the packages - ShopSys, Sylius and Spryker. He goes on to talk about some of the tool choices and the resulting code violations from the PSR-2 checks. He also covers some of the "cleaners" that helped to remove some dead code and the violations uncovered by PHPStan.

tagged: easycodingstandard phpstan ecommerce results series part2

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2017/10/02/easy-coding-standard-and-phpstan-meet-3-symfony-ecommerce-projects/

Armin Weihbold:
Diving into API Platform - Part 2
Oct 02, 2017 @ 11:50:15

Armin Weihbold has continued his series looking at building APIs in PHP applications in part two covering the use of the API Platform project as a base. You can find part one here if you need to get caught up.

He picks up right where the last article ends and continues setting up the Docker environment for the application. Once he figured out a small snag in the setup he was able to get the basic documentation (the list of endpoints) up and running.

Next he creates a "material design" administration interface using React showing how he pulled in the requirements he needed to get the interface up and running. Code is included for the interface and a screenshot is included so you can see the end result.

tagged: api platform apiplatform project tutorial series part2 frontend docker

Link: https://medium.com/@koyaan5/diving-into-api-platform-part-2-1ce890c0b85f

Loïc Faugeron:
PragmatiClean - Command Bus
Sep 20, 2017 @ 09:41:57

Continuing on from the first part of the series Loïc Faugeron has posted the next tutorial in the "PragmatiClean" series covering the use of the Command Bus pattern in your application.

The Command Bus pattern relies on 3 types of classes:

The first one is the Command [...] next is the Command Handler [and] finally there's a Command Bus interface allowing us to build Middlewares.

For each of these parts of the design pattern he covers what the part is and how it fits into the overall structure the pattern defines. He also looks at how it allows for easier adherence to the ideas of both "clean" and "pragmatic" code. The post ends with an example of implementing the Command Bus pattern in a Symfony-based application, building out each part and their integration.

tagged: pragmaticlean commandbus designpattern tutorial series part2

Link: https://gnugat.github.io/2017/09/20/pragmaticlean-command-bus.html

Delicious Brains Blog:
Grav CMS | Self-Hosted WordPress Alternatives Part 2
Aug 30, 2017 @ 11:52:33

On the Delicious Brains blog they've posted the second part of their series sharing some self-hosted alternatives to WordPress for your CMS needs. In this new article they focus on Grav.

When I started the Self-Hosted WordPress Alternatives series in July with a review of Craft CMS, there were several comments asking what I thought of Grav – an open source flat-file CMS that also has a really cool looking website.

I had never heard of Grav before, but was immediately drawn to it for a few reasons. It’s open source, which is one of the things that I really love about WordPress since it enables a much larger community to work on the project. And since it’s a file-only CMS, there is no database to mess around with which in theory could make development and migrations easier in the long run.

The tutorial then walks you through the installation process and some examples of it in use (including screenshots of the UI). He also covers the core architecture of the tool, theme usage, SEO integration and eCommerce solutions that play well with Grav. He finishes the post looking at the quality of the current documentation and what kind of pricing and licensing Grav comes with.

tagged: series part2 wordpress alternative grav flatfile overview

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/grav-cms-self-hosted-wordpress-alternatives-part-2/

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 2)
Aug 11, 2017 @ 10:44:19

Mark Baker has posted the second part of his series covering the use of closures and anonymous classes as an alternative approach to mocking in your unit tests. In part one he introduced some of the basic concepts behind their use and in this latest post he focuses on "different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties".

The last time I posted here, I was writing about Anonymous Functions and how they can be bound to any object (or class) to execute as though they are a method within the scope of that class (Closure Binding as an alternative to “use” variables); and in the first article in this series, I looked at using a Closure to access private and protected properties of an object.

I was going to write this particular article about using simple Anonymous Classes to create test doubles for Unit Testing – and may well return to that topic in a future article in the series – but Matt Brunt has written a good post on that topic already, so instead I’m going to focus on a different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties that we otherwise couldn’t see directly when testing a class.

He goes on to talk about some ideas from the Java ecosystem around nested classes and scoping. He then shows how, with closure binding, the same kind of effect can be created in PHP testing. He includes the code for an example of a class that coverts distance measurements. He then introduces his "SpyMaster" utility class that "infiltrates" the class under test and attaches the closure providing the needed point for testing. He finishes up the post talking about this functionality and how the technique can be used in many places, not just testing class constructors.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part2 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/07/30/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-2/

Sammy Kaye Powers:
Writing tests for PHP source (Series)
Jul 21, 2017 @ 11:21:48

Sammy Kaye Powers has a series of posts over on his site introducing you to testing the PHP language with .phpt tests. So far he's introduced the topic, shown how to run the tests and debugging failing tests.

If you've ever wanted to get involved with PHP internals, writing tests is a great way to get your foot into the door. The tests are written in PHP so you don't even need to know C to get started.

Each of the posts also comes with a screencast, narrated by Sammy, showing the information presented in the tutorial:

There's more to come in the series as he still plans to teach about how to fix current tests and how to eventually create your own. Stay tuned to his site for more tutorials in the series.

tagged: test unittest phpt language source series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://www.sammyk.me/compiling-php-from-source-writing-tests-for-php-source

Cal Evans:
Mautic Step 2 – Cron Jobs
Jul 11, 2017 @ 09:16:40

Cal Evans has posted the second part of his series as he works through the installation and configuration of the Mautic PHP-based marketing automation tool. In this part of the series he focuses on cron jobs.

This time we are talking about the cron jobs necessary to make Mautic run. Mautic has several commands that are necessary to execute that are not web based. They are run from the command line manually (dumb idea) or using a scheduler like cron on Linux. As with my “Installing Mautic” post, this post is only interesting to those of you self-hosting Mautic.

There is a great manual page on this titles “Cron Jobs”. It tells you a lot of what I’ll tell you here. If you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend you start there.

He talks about each of the four jobs that, if you're using the system yourself, will want to run often: one for handling segments, two for campaigns and another for sending messages. He also talks about the main problem he ran into during his work with the cron jobs - permissions issues. He shares how he resolved this issue with an extra line in his crontab (after changing the user they ran as) and ends with some extra advice against wide open permissions.

tagged: mautic series part2 install configure cronjob cron tutorial marketing automation

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2017/07/10/mautic-step-2-cron-jobs/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Hello, Laravel? Communicating with PHP through SMS!
Jun 27, 2017 @ 11:05:29

In a previous article the SitePoint PHP blog showed you how to use Laravel, the Twilio service and some helpful packages to create an application that allowed interaction via phone calls. In this new tutorial they continue the series and update the application to allow interaction via SMS messages.

In this article, we will modify our Laravel-powered phone-capable weather forecast app so that it is accessible via SMS (text message) in addition to the voice telephone system.

They just add on the functionality rather than creating a new application for the SMS side, adding new routes, controller methods and changing up the service layer a bit. It also includes the messaging that comes back from Twilio and how the response needs to be formatted. Finally, the article shows (with screenshots included) how to configure your Twilio application to allow messaging as well as phone calls. The post ends with screenshots of the application on a mobile device sending the requests for the weather information based on the zip code provided.

tagged: tutorial laravel twilio sms weather communication series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/hello-laravel-communicating-php-sms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building a Social Network with Laravel and Stream? Easy!
Apr 19, 2017 @ 13:53:03

Christopher Vundi has continued his series covering the integration of Laravel and the Stream service in this new tutorial. In the first post he showed how to add "follow" handling to the application, complete with a real-time stream event when it happens. In this new post he uses some of the same handling to enhance this to a larger "social network" type application.

In the previous post, we saw how to add the follow functionality to a Laravel app. We also looked at how to configure our app to use Stream. This part will focus on: configuring our models in order to make it possible to track activities, the different types of feeds that Stream provides, getting feeds from Stream [and] rendering the different types of feeds in a view.

He starts in with the "activity field" functionality, a base level object that stores each event that happens in the system and is then relayed to Stream. Then, using the included "feed manager" in the Stream package, he shows how to use built-in feeds and add in a custom feed for follow and unfollow events. The tutorial then walks through the output process of the events, handling of the updates from Stream and routing those back out to the waiting news feed on the frontend.

tagged: social network follow event stream streamio service tutorial series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/building-social-network-laravel-stream-easy/