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Master Zend Framework:
How to Build a Docker Test Environment
Sep 28, 2016 @ 11:20:40

The Master Zend Framework site continues their series covering the creation of a Docker-based testing environment in this second part highlighting the addition of testing support.

In the first part in this series on developing web applications using Docker, we saw how to create a local development environment using Docker; one ideally suited to creating Zend Expressive (or any other kind of PHP-based web application). But, what we didn’t cover was how to handle testing in a Docker-based environment.

[...] How do you run tests when working with Docker containers? After a bit of searching, I found that it’s not that difficult. But you have to use the right combination of commands.

Since unit tests can be run locally if need be (they shouldn't need any resources from the service if they're true unit tests) he focuses on acceptance testing. For his examples he uses the Codeception testing tool. He walks you through the setup of some simple tests based on the "home" page functionality of the Zend Expressive skeleton application. With that in place, he shows the updates that will need to be made to execute the tests from outside the instance via a "docker exec" call. The post finishes with a look at adding two other tools to the mix as well: Make and Phing.

tagged: docker test environment series part2 testing acceptance codeception make phing

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/how-to-build-a-docker-test-environment/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PHP, Arduino, And… Minecraft? Connecting an Arduino to PHP!
Jul 12, 2016 @ 10:39:38

The SitePoint PHP blog has continued their series looking at connecting the real world with the online world via Minecraft and an Arduino. In this new post author Christopher Pitt picks up where he left off in part one and brings the Arduino in to the picture.

In the first part of this series, we learned a bit of Minecraft and the circuitry we can make inside it. We also made a circuit to alert us when the door to our mansion was opened. We then hooked this virtual alarm to a listening PHP script, so we can know when the door is opened in the context of a PHP script.

In this part, we’ll build a small Arduino-based alarm circuit. We’ll learn how to trigger the alarm, using the the official IDE and programming language, and then using something called Firmata. We’ll round the series out by connecting the alarm circuit to the Minecraft circuit, so we hear a real alarm for Minecraft mansion.

He takes some time at the beginning of the post introducing the Arduino hardware and what they have to offer. He lists the parts you'll need for this setup to work and how they need to be set up. He then gets into the code for the Ardunio side and how to get it over to the board. He presents another option to the potentially painful change-reupload cycle of debugging Arduino code: using the PHP "carica/firmata" library to connect to and add listeners to hook into the board. He uses this to then set up a PHP script to watch for changes in the Minecraft log files and fire an event to the waiting Arduino board.

The final item in this part of the tutorial series talks about bringing in the "Gorilla" extension for Carica Firmata to help prevent issues with too fast connections to the board interrupting the boot sequence.

tagged: tutorial series part2 minecraft arduino alarm connecting event loop

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/php-arduino-and-minecraft-connecting-an-arduino-to-php/

Davey Shafik:
Community Relations: Not Just a Megaphone
Jul 11, 2016 @ 10:49:04

Davey Shafik has continued his series of posts with advice about growing a community around your product/open source libraries. In his first post he talked more about how to engage the community. In this latest post he talks about the role of "evangelists" in community relations (and why he dislikes the term).

The role of the Community Builder is to sell you on the idea of the company and the product. Not necessarily to sell you the product. Often times what we’re selling are not bought without some decision making process behind them, so a sale is not going to happen then and there anyway. Provide the education, and build the trust, and the sale will happen.

Davey then talks about why he hates the term "evangelist" and how it seems to relate more to "fanatic" than "advocate". He then gets into what he sees as the role of an advocate, including the role honesty plays and selling the customer on the right product. He then turns it around and talks about the other side of the role - advocating for the customer back to the rest of the company. Finally, he talks about two other kinds of advocacy that should also be included in the role: advocating for the community/their input and for yourself (finding a product you can be passionate about selling).

tagged: community relation megaphone building advocate evangelist opinion series part2

Link: https://daveyshafik.com/archives/70035-community-relations-not-just-a-megaphone.html

TutsPlus.com:
Internationalizing WordPress Projects: A Practical Example, Part 1
Jul 06, 2016 @ 10:50:43

Tom McFarlin has continued his series covering internationalization in WordPress applications with this latest part of the series. In the previous part of the series he introduced some of the basic topics and terms. In this new tutorial he gets more into functionality creating the plugin he'll use in his examples.

Given that WordPress powers roughly 25% of the web and that the web is not local to your country of origin, it makes sense to ensure that the work that we produce can be translated into other locations.

To be clear, this does not mean that you, as the developer, are responsible for translating all of the strings in your codebase into the various languages that your customers may use. Instead, it means that you use the proper APIs to ensure someone else can come along and provide translations for them.

He then walks you through the download of the latest WordPress version (a Subversion checkout) and the creation of the plugin structure. He provides sample code to define the plugin and shows how it should look in the "Plugins" listing. He helps you add in the menu item with internationalized strings for the link text. They help you add a simple screen for the plugin and help you style the page a bit. The post ends with a brief mention of object-oriented programming but points out that OOP introduces other, not necessarily related, topics that could detract from the WordPress-related content (and so will not be used).

tagged: wordpress internationalization i18n tutorial series part2 plugin example practical

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/internationalizing-wordpress-projects-a-practical-example-part-1--cms-26676

TutsPlus.com:
Using PHP CodeSniffer With WordPress: Installing and Using PHP CodeSniffer
Jun 15, 2016 @ 12:38:21

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series showing the use of the PHP CodeSniffer tool with WordPress. In the first part of the series they introduced "code smells" and build on that in part two with the installation and use of PHP CodeSniffer to detect these smells.

In the first article of this series, we defined code smells and looked at a few examples of what they are and how we may refactor them so the quality of the code is improved.

[...] Ultimately, we're working towards implementing WordPress-specific code sniffing rules, but before we do that it's important to familiarize yourself with PHP CodeSniffer. In this article, we're going to take a look at what PHP CodeSniffer is, how to install it, how to run it against an example script, and how to refactor said script. Then we'll look at how we're going to move forward into WordPress-specific code.

The tutorial then shows you how to get the tool installed using Composer, not the PEAR method. They help you install Composer then create the simple project with a composer.json configuration file defining the dependency. They provide a sample bit of code to run the analysis against and an example of the output showing violations of the coding standard.

tagged: wordpress tutorial phpcodesniffer coding standards series part2

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-php-codesniffer-with-wordpress-installing-and-using-php-codesniffer--cms-26394

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Localizing Dates, Currency, and Numbers with Php-Intl
May 23, 2016 @ 12:52:32

On the SitePoint PHP blog Younes Rafie has continued his series about the PHP "Intl" extension for use in internationalizing an application. in this second part of the series he moves away from just strings and looks at using it for currencies and numbers.

The first part of this series was an introduction of the PHP Intl extension and of how to localize your application’s messages. In this part, we’re going to learn about localizing numbers, dates, calendars, and similar complex data.

The post is broken down into a few different sections, each with their own examples:

  • Localizing Decimals
  • Localizing Currencies
  • Timezones
  • Calendars

The "Intl" extension makes these operations relatively simple with plenty of built-in objects and methods to help with the translations between the formats. You can find out more about this extension in the PHP manual.

tagged: date currency localization number tutorial intl extension series part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/localizing-dates-currency-and-numbers-with-php-intl/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PredictionIO and Lumen: Building a Movie Recommendation App (Part 2)
Apr 06, 2016 @ 14:30:42

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the next part in their series about using Predictive.IO and Lumen to create a simple movie recommendation application (part one is here). In this second part of the series they build on the environment created in the previous article and start developing the actual application.

In the intro, we covered the basics of PredictionIO and installed its dependencies. In this part, we’re going to build the movie recommendation app.

The tutorial starts with a brief configuration section to ensure you have your API keys configured correctly. Then it gets into the code:

  • Pulling the data from the Movie DB API
  • Creating the endpoint to perform the endpoint
  • Picking random movies to show the user and recording their reactions (like/dislike)
  • Creating the endpoint to recommend movies

Finally they share the configuration to set up the application deployment and train it with some example content you provide through some basic interactions. Finally they help you set up a cron job to train and redeploy the application every five minutes with the latest interaction information.

tagged: tutorial predictionio series part2 movie recommendation implement application

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/predictionio-and-lumen-building-a-movie-recommendation-app/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Fun and Functional Programming in PHP with Macros
Apr 04, 2016 @ 10:13:37

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted from author Christopher Pitt continuing on his look at macros in PHP (part one is here). In this new tutorial he gets beyond the basic example he provided in part one and recreate some expressive syntax from Javascript and prefixing strings.

I was so excited about my previous article about PHP macros, that I thought it would be fun for us to explore the intersection of macros and functional programming. PHP is already full of functions, with object oriented patterns emerging relatively late in its life. Still, PHP’s functions can be cumbersome, especially when combined with variable scope rules…

[...] It’s not significantly more code [to append the prefix in PHP vs Javascript], but it isn’t as clear or idiomatic as the JavaScript alternative. I often miss JavaScript’s expressive, functional syntax, when I’m building PHP things. I want to try and win back some of that expressive syntax!

He starts with a quick install of the yay library used in the first part of the series. Instead of the manual prefixing from his first example, he creates a macro that uses the array_map handling to generate the necessary code once the pre-compiler has done its job. He then expands on this simpler solution and updates it to allow for the setting of the prefix string. It gets a little complex but he walks through each step of the way, explaining the code that's added and what it expands out to. The result is a map method that generates a bit of code that's eval-ed to handle the prefixing automatically.

tagged: macro series part2 tutorial array map prefix advanced precompile yay library

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/functional-programming-in-php-with-macros/

PHP Roundtable:
039: From Idea To Production: Part 2
Mar 01, 2016 @ 09:50:43

The PHP Roundtable podcast has posted their latest episode, the second part of a series devoted to working "from idea to production" - Episode #39.

We get an update on status of the project we discussed in part 1 and discuss next steps to take our dance event management app idea to production.

Like in part one of the series, host Sammy Kaye Powers is joined by guests Steven Maguire, Jocelyn Lopez and Glen Hinkle. You can watch the recording of this live show either using the in-page video player or directly on YouTube. If you enjoy the show and want to see future episodes, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates as they're released.

tagged: phproundtable podcast video part2 series idea production update

Link: https://www.phproundtable.com/episode/part-2-turning-an-idea-into-code-for-production

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Consume Laravel API with AngularJS
Feb 22, 2016 @ 11:23:10

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial from author Francesco Malatesta that continues their series looking at combining AngularJS and PHP, more specifically Laravel, to create a basic application. In this part of series he builds on the server-side code created in part one and creates the Angular frontend.

In part 1, we built our server part. Now we can build our client. We are going to use AngularJS to make a Single Page Application. We will use a very basic bootstrap template, built on the fly.

The application is simple enough and will consist of three "screens" (not "pages" since it's a single page application): a login, a signup and a main screen. He walks you through the setup of a standard frontend development environment including tools and software you'll need to get started. He makes the simple route and Blade template for the single-page app and defines some AngularJS routes for each of the screens. He then includes the code to set up both the signup and login controllers and how to detect if the user is successfully logged in. From there he gets into the functional part of the application: managing the books and the user's wishlist with the standard CRUD (create, read, update and delete) operations. Screenshots are also included at some spots so you can ensure your progress matches the tutorial.

tagged: tutorial angularjs laravel part2 screen login signup book wishlist

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-consume-laravel-api-with-angularjs/