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Hackernoon.com:
Automatically Running PHPUnit With Watchman
Apr 12, 2017 @ 10:40:55

On the Hackernoon site today Sebastian De Deyne has written up a tutorial showing you how to use Watchman to automatically run PHPUnit tests for your application when things change. Watchman is a tool from Facebook that watches files and directories for updates and execute actions based on the changes.

Watchman watches files and triggers actions when they change. The reasoning behing choosing Watchman: it’s easy to install, simple to configure, and reliable.

The watchman-make command - which ships with Watchman - is a specialised interface for Watchman to invoke build tools in response to file changes - exactly what we need!

In the setup he creates, Watchman is used to look for changes on files in either the project's src/ or tests/ directories and execute a bash script (code provided) that runs the tests and outputs the results. He walks through each line of the script and Watchman command, explaining how it works and what the option points to. You can see the results here of an edit to a test and the output in a Terminal window once it's saved.

tagged: watchman phpunit test automatic execution change facebook tutorial

Link: https://hackernoon.com/automatically-running-phpunit-with-watchman-e02757e733e7

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: Directory Structure
Apr 11, 2017 @ 11:53:59

Fabien Potencier continues his look at what's coming in the next major release of the Symfony framework (v4) in this new post to his site. In it he talks about changes to the default directory structure that Symfony 4-based applications will use.

Symfony 3 came with a slightly different directory structure than Symfony 2. Symfony 4 will also come with a reworked directory structure. Mostly incremental adjustments to support new features and best practices.

The Symfony 3 directory structure introduced a more standard Unix-like directory structure, with less sub-directories. Symfony 4 keeps going in that direction.

There's six changes he mentions specifically, each with a brief summary of what they'll contain:

  • Tests under tests/
  • Templates under templates/
  • Configuration under etc/
  • Source Code under src/
  • Temporary files under var/
  • Web files under web/

He ends the post with a quick note that, while these will be defaults, all of it is optional and these directories will be created automatically if they don't exist.

tagged: src etc template test structure directory symfony4 var web overview

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-directory-structure.html

Colin O'Dell:
PHPUnicorn - Visualizing PHPUnit Tests
Mar 16, 2017 @ 09:32:57

Colin O'Dell, as mentioned on his blog, has put together the instructions for something he calls "PHPUnicorn" (not to be confused with the PHP Unicorn conference) - a real-time system for visualizing unit test results via a Raspberry Pi, some LEDs and a Unicorn pHAT board.

For Pi Day 2017 I created a really fun project - the PHPUnicorn!

A simple PHPUnit listener collects test results and sends them to a Raspberry Pi Zero Wireless device in real-time. As the device receives the stats it lights up LEDs green, red, or orange to visualize the progress and results of your unit tests.

The full instructions are over in this article on the Hackster.io site providing you with a list of the components needed, how you'll need to extend PHPUnit with a custom listener and a simple Python script to interface with the Pi and Unicorn board. The end result is a set of LEDs on the board showing the progress (and failures) of your unit tests being run.

tagged: visualize phpunit test progress raspberrypi unicorn

Link: https://www.hackster.io/colinodell/phpunicorn-visualizing-phpunit-tests-896208

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Testing Frenzy – Can We BDD Test the Units?
Jan 30, 2017 @ 12:50:10

On the SitePoint PHP blog editor Bruno Skvorc has written up a tutorial about using the Peridot tool to do BDD style testing but on the units of code rather than the behavior of your integrated application (your business logic).

We’ve done our share of testing posts here at SitePoint, with more coming soon, but I wanted to show you a relatively new testing tool I found that caught my attention because of how unconventional it seemed.

Peridot is a BDD testing framework (so behavior driven testing) but for your units of code – not your business logic. Wait, what? Yes.

He gives an example of the test structure and how a similar kind of test would reduce down to assertions evaluating your units of code. He also includes an example of Peridot's human-friendly output for both passing and failing tests. He goes on to talk about the concurrency the tool allows, the feature to focus on/skip certain tests, use events and plugins, and output a code coverage report. Several more features are also discussed including custom scopes and the ability to define custom DSL definitions you might find easier to work with in your testing.

tagged: bdd test unittest peridot tool package tutorial introduction

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/testing-frenzy-can-we-bdd-test-the-units/

DeliciousBrains.com:
Writing Functional Tests for WP-CLI Packages
Jan 05, 2017 @ 12:57:25

On the Delicious Brains blog there's a post sharing some of their knowledge about building tests for WP-CLI packages, a set of command line tools for administering a WordPress installation. Their testing makes use of the Behat testing tool (already in use on WP-CLI's own tests).

My last article was part of a short series on automating local WordPress site setup. In that series, we created a WP-CLI package that helps with installing and uninstalling WordPress development environments, and we even got it submitted to the WP-CLI Package Index.

[...] In this post we’re going to take a bit of a break from automating WordPress installs and start writing some functional tests to make sure that everything works as expected. While I’ll be writing the tests for the wp installer command, the same concepts should apply for any WP-CLI package.

They start by clarifying the difference between functional and unit tests and how to get your environment all set up and ready to use for testing. They help you get the wp_scaffold_package installed and how to confirm that everything is working as expected. From there it's all about the tests: ensuring that a package is active, creating a custom step to use in testing and an example of what the output should look like.

tagged: functional test wordpress wpcli package behat tutorial

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/writing-functional-tests-wp-cli-packages/

Laravel News:
Run PHPUnit Tests From Sublime Text
Dec 29, 2016 @ 09:30:48

On the Laravel News site they've posted a guide showing you how to setup and run PHPUnit tests from Sublime Text, one of the more popular editors for code development.

Sublime Text is a great editor. It’s lightweight, fast, and extremely customizable. However, one downside to it compared to a full blown IDE is it doesn’t come with support for running your PHPUnit tests directly from the test class you are working with.

To solve this problem, Adam Wathan created and released a free package named Sublime PHPUnit that allows you to run your tests from a keyboard shortcut. Let’s take a look at how to add this package to your arsenal.

The post walks you through the installation of the tool (manually cloning the repository) and how to then use it via Sublime's command palette. There's also some instruction on customizing the plugin's setup and allowing for shortcut keystrokes bound to events the plugin provides. The final tip helps you change the tool used to run the tests (the Terminal app by default) over to something like ITerm.

tagged: phpunit test unittest sublimetext editor plugin keystroke run

Link: https://laravel-news.com/sublime-phpunit

Joe Ferguson:
Mocking Swift Mailer – 3 Steps to better code
Dec 22, 2016 @ 10:46:43

If you're a user of the SwiftMailer package in your application, you may have hit on issues with your unit tests with mocking the library to isolate it from the actual email sending. Joe Ferguson is here to help with some advice in his latest post on mocking the library and how he used it to solve a problem in his own code.

A few days ago an issue came across my Jira queue that mentioned odd characters showing up in the subject line of our notification system. We use SwiftMailer library which is a fantastic library for sending mail.

[...] Something was taking our twig template that we use for our email subject and changing the encoding. This is normally done when you want to convert special characters so they’re not interpreted as code blocks. The example above is showing where an apostrophe is converted to “'”, the ASCII code equivalent.

He breaks the rest of the post into 3 steps (well, really 4 but there's a 2.5 in there) that he followed to mock the library out appropriately and be able to test the message sending without actually having to send. Code examples are included of both the code doing the sending and the test doing the mocking and verifying the subject lines on their emails (the original bug reported).

tagged: mocking unittest swiftmailer package test tutorial

Link: https://www.joeferguson.me/mocking-swift-mailer-3-steps-to-better-code/

PHP.net:
PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 5 Released
Oct 27, 2016 @ 10:25:04

The main PHP.net page has posted an announcement about the latest Release Candidate in the PHP 7.1.x series being tagged and released: PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 5:

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 5. This release is the fifth release candidate for 7.1.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

For more information on the new features and other changes, you can read the NEWS file, or the UPGRADING file for a complete list of upgrading notes. These files can also be found in the release archive.

As a reminder, this is a release candidate and is not to be used in production. You can download and test out this latest release from the PHP.net source QA site or the Windows QA site for the binaries. The next release candidate for this version will be released on November 10th with a goal of a final release following that.

tagged: php71 release candidate release preview test php71rc5

Link: http://php.net/index.php#id2016-10-27-1

PHP.net:
PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 3 Released
Sep 30, 2016 @ 11:47:01

The php.net site has posted an announcement about the latest Release Candidate for the PHP 7.1.x series: PHP 7.1.0 RC 3:

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Release Candidate 3. This release is the third release candidate for 7.1.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

[...] For more information on the new features and other changes, you can read the NEWS file, or the UPGRADING file for a complete list of upgrading notes. These files can also be found in the release archive.

As a reminder, this is a preview release and is NOT designed to be used in production . The release schedule is provided on the wiki, the next Release Candidate will be coming in early October (the 10th) with three more following. The target release date for PHP 7.1.0 is sometime in the later part of November.

tagged: php71 release candidate release preview test

Link: http://php.net/index.php#id2016-09-29-1

Master Zend Framework:
How to Build a Docker Test Environment
Sep 28, 2016 @ 11:20:40

The Master Zend Framework site continues their series covering the creation of a Docker-based testing environment in this second part highlighting the addition of testing support.

In the first part in this series on developing web applications using Docker, we saw how to create a local development environment using Docker; one ideally suited to creating Zend Expressive (or any other kind of PHP-based web application). But, what we didn’t cover was how to handle testing in a Docker-based environment.

[...] How do you run tests when working with Docker containers? After a bit of searching, I found that it’s not that difficult. But you have to use the right combination of commands.

Since unit tests can be run locally if need be (they shouldn't need any resources from the service if they're true unit tests) he focuses on acceptance testing. For his examples he uses the Codeception testing tool. He walks you through the setup of some simple tests based on the "home" page functionality of the Zend Expressive skeleton application. With that in place, he shows the updates that will need to be made to execute the tests from outside the instance via a "docker exec" call. The post finishes with a look at adding two other tools to the mix as well: Make and Phing.

tagged: docker test environment series part2 testing acceptance codeception make phing

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/how-to-build-a-docker-test-environment/