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James Cowie:
All hail Xdebug and lets let var dump die
Jan 12, 2017 @ 12:58:23

In a recent post to his site James Cowie sings the praises of Xdebug for debugging and says that "var_dump must die" as a method for debugging in your application development flow.

How many times have you been working in Magento or any other php application and hit an error, exception or something not quite right? For me a lot. I’ve been that developer that debugs by fire and throws echo var_dumps and dies around like a western gunslinger. It’s easy, provides quick feedback cycles but lets be honest its lazy, in efficient, rarely provides all of the data you need to solve the problem on the first try and its not something you want to boast about by the coffee machine.

[...] So whats the “better” way of debugging a application? Well welcome Xdebug + PHPStorm. Imagine inside of the IDE we can set a breakpoint, a fancy die and reload our web page. Magically the IDE has stopped execution and we can see the state of the application at that exact path. We can see the variables and we can step through the code and see exactly what class and method is called next and so on and so forth.

While his instructions are specific to PHPStorm, most major IDEs will have a similar setup process with their own tweaks. In his case, though, he has one more layer of complexity - the PHP is executing inside a Docker container. He walks you through the process he followed to get the flow from container to local IDE set up. He wraps up the post with an example of debugging a script and what the results look like inside of PHPStorm (including a screencast).

tagged: xdebug vardump phpstorm docker container tutorial

Link: http://jamescowie.me/blog/2016/12/all-hail-xdebug-and-lets-let-var-dump-die/

Mattias Noback:
Containerizing a static website with Docker, part III
Jan 09, 2017 @ 11:48:46

Matthias Noback has posted the third part of his "containerizing a static website with Docker" service, continuing on from his previous two posts to look at deploying the environment he's created.

In the previous posts we looked at creating a build container, and after that we created a blog container, serving our generated static website.

It's quite surprising to me how simple the current setup is — admittedly, it's a simple application too. It takes about 50 lines of configuration to get everything up and running.

The idea of the blog container, which has nginx as its main process, is to deploy it to a production server whenever we feel like it, in just "one click". There should be no need to configure a server to host our website, and it should not be necessary to build the application on the server too. This is in fact the promise, and the true power of Docker.

He then gets into the two remaining steps in the process resulting in the deployment of the simple application: pushing to Docker Hub and deploying out to a DigitalOcean server. He includes all of the commands and configuration you'll need to get the process set up and work with the remote machine.

tagged: docker series container part3 deploy dockerhub digitalocean

Link: https://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2017/01/containerizing-a-static-website-with-docker-part-iii/

Matthias Noback:
Containerizing a static website with Docker (Part 1 & 2)
Jan 06, 2017 @ 09:07:39

Matthias Noback has started a series to his site showing you how to use Docker along with a static site, like one generated with Sculpin to create a complete environment. So far he's posted part one and part two.

Recently a former colleague of mine, Lucas van Lierop, showed me his new website, which he created using Spress. Lucas took two bold moves: he started freelancing, and he open-sourced his website code. This to me was very inspiring. I've been getting up to speed with Docker recently and am planning to do a lot more with it over the coming months, and being able to take a look at the source code of up-to-date projects that use Docker is certainly invaluable.

Taking lots of inspiration from Lucas's codebase, and after several hours of fiddling with configuration files, I can now guide you through the steps it took to containerize my blog (which is the site you're visiting now) and deploy a single container to a production server.

In part one he talks about how his blog is currently set up - based on a "large set of Markdown files" - and using Sculpin to generate the resulting site. He walks through the configuration of the Sculpin installation and how to configure and build the initial container, the "build" container.

In part two he continues the process but creates a "blog" container this time. This container runs the web server itself (nginx) configured as required by the Sculpin formatting.

tagged: container docker static website tutorial series part1 part2

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/categories/Docker/

DotDev.co:
Understanding the Laravel Service Container
Sep 13, 2016 @ 12:56:04

The Dotdev.co blog has posted a tutorial for the Laravel users out there with the goal of helping you understand the Laravel service container, a key part of the framework's functionality and an extensible feature you can adapt to some of your own needs.

Learning how to build an application with Laravel is not just about learning to use the different classes and components within the framework, it is not about remembering all artisan commands or remembering all helper functions (we have Google for that). Learning to code with Laravel is learning the philosophy of Laravel, its elegance and its beautiful syntax. I personally feel it is an art and a craft (its not a coincidence that Laravel developers are sometimes referred to as Web artisans). This is true for any other framework as well.

A major part of Laravel’s philosophy is the Service Container or IoC container. As a Laravel developer, understanding and using the Service Container properly is a crucial part in mastering your craft, as it is the core of any Laravel application.

The post starts with some of the basics about the container and how objects/instances are bound to it. They give an example of binding a FooService class in the "register" methods of providers. A code example is also included showing how to use the service you previously bound. There's also a description of binding interfaces in the IoC, making it easier for custom classes to resolve interfaces when they're implemented. The post wraps up with a bit covering the resolving of dependencies and the code you'll need to set them up.

tagged: laravel service container introduction tutorial framework bind

Link: https://dotdev.co/understanding-laravel-service-container-bd488ca05280#.9gd6v3t4l

Zend Developer Zone:
Testing your project with PHP 7.1
Aug 23, 2016 @ 12:20:12

On the Zend Developer Zone author Cal Evans has written up a post showing you how to test your application with PHP 7.1, the upcoming minor release version for the PHP 7.x series.

Both PHP 7.0 and the upcoming PHP 7.1 release are fairly benign releases. They do not break backwards compatibility except in a few edge cases. If you’ve not yet moved to PHP 7.0, check out our posts tagged php7 for details on what might trip you up there.

Regardless of what version you are moving to, 7.0 or 7.1, you are going to want to test your application before you make the move in production. Sometimes that is difficult though you need a server properly configured, you need someone to manage it, most importantly, you need unit tests. While I can’t help you with that last one – other than point you to @grmpyprogrammer who will publicly abuse you until you write them – I can help you with the “where to test” problem.

Cal shows how to make use of Docker containers to easily test your application in a more self-contained environment and make it simpler to swap out the PHP versions in your platform. He walks you through the steps you'll need to follow to get the environment set up, pull down required components, install and compile PHP and, finally, install Composer globally. Once set up, he shows how to log in, clone your project and execute its test suite. He finishes the post with a few comments about this being a "sandbox", not a CI environment and how it is "future proof" for later versions of PHP too (as it doesn't lock it down to just PHP 7.1.x).

tagged: testing project php71 docker container tutorial

Link: https://devzone.zend.com/7262/testing-project-php-7-1/

Matt Allan:
Understanding Dependency Injection Containers
Jul 18, 2016 @ 11:54:54

In this recent post to his site Matt Allan introduces a concept that's become an integral part of most major PHP frameworks and applications recently: dependency injection containers.

If you are writing modern PHP, you will run across dependency injection a lot. Basically all dependency injection means is that if an object needs something, you pass it in. So if you have a class [...] you would pass in (inject) the object it needs (the dependency) instead of instantiating it in the class. Dependency injection makes your code more flexible and easier to test. If you want to learn more about dependency injection in general, check out this summary in the PHP The Right Way guide.

He then breaks down the main concept, the container, and how it is usually used to store instances of various objects and other functionality. He includes the code to create a simple container, allowing for closures to be set to "entries" values. He also shows how to update the simple container to allow for singleton handling, creating an object once and returning it over and over (useful in some cases).

tagged: dependency injection container tutorial introduction

Link: http://mattallan.org/2016/dependency-injection-containers/

Yappa Blog:
Symfony Components in a Legacy PHP application
Jun 21, 2016 @ 12:50:13

On the Yappa Tech blog Joeri Verdeyen has written up a post covering the integration of modern Symfony components into a legacy application with a relatively simple container setup and configuration.

Symfony Components are a set of decoupled and reusable PHP libraries. They are becoming the standard foundation on which the best PHP applications are built. You can use any of these components in any of your applications independently from the Symfony Framework.

[...] The purpose of this post is to roughly describe how to implement some of the Symfony Components. I've created a set of gists to get started. You should already know how Symfony Components work in the Symfony Framework.

He starts with an example Composer configuration pulling in some of the more popular Symfony packages (like VarDumper and FormBuilder). He then includes the code to bootstrap the container instance and the services.yml he's come up with to bootstrap and integrate all of the components. The tutorial ends with examples of putting some of these components to use in resolving controllers, using the FormBuilder, using the command line and outputting errors with the VarDumper.

tagged: symfony component legacy application tutorial container example

Link: http://tech.yappa.be/symfony-components-in-a-legacy-php-application

Vic Cherubini:
Writing Functional Tests for Services in Symfony
Jun 16, 2016 @ 12:35:07

Vic Cherubini has written up a tutorial on his site showing you how to write functional tests for Symfony services in your application. He provides a practical example of testing a basic Symfony service and the configuration/code to go with it.

The dependency injector is an amazingly simple and flexible addition to Symfony, and one you should be using to properly structure your application. But what happens when you want to write a functional (or integration) test for a service that depends on another service? This article will show you an easy way to test complex services.

He sets up a simple InvoiceGenerator service that takes in a Doctrine entity manager and a "payment processor" instance. He stubs out a simple PaymentProcessor class and shows the configuration needed to set it all up for correct injection. He then gets into the testing of this setup, creating a simple test case that requests the invoice generator from the service container. In this call the services_test definition overrides the default and injects the test payment processor instead of the actual one.

tagged: symfony functional test services example tutorial configuration container injection

Link: https://viccherubini.com/2016/06/writing-functional-tests-for-services-in-symfony

Marc Scholten:
Accidental Complexity Caused By Service Containers In The PHP World
May 24, 2016 @ 11:25:30

In this post to his site Marc Scholten talks about something that's become a side effect of using the inversion of control design pattern in PHP applications (specifically related to dependency injection): added accidental complexity.

Modern PHP development favors the use of inversion of control to keep software more configurable and flexible. This leads to the problem that one now has to create a big graph of objects to use the application. As a solution to avoid redundant setup code, service containers like the symfony2 dependency injection component are used.

The goal of a service container is to centralize the construction of big object graphs. [...] Simple, right? Actually it’s not. Commonly used service containers are complex solution for simple problems.

He illustrates with an example using the Symfony services container, a piece of the framework that allows the definition of dependency relationships via a YAML formatted file. While this configuration seems simple enough, he points out that more complex dependencies (ones that could easier be set via a "set" method) become more difficult to define when limited by the service container config structure. He also points out that it makes static analysis of the code much more difficult with dependencies being dynamically fetched from the container instead of directly related. He offers an alternative to this complex container setup, however: a simple method (or methods) inside of a factory class that creates the objects, injects the required dependencies. This makes it much easier to call from the service container instance and configuration and even a "create container" call to set all of the dependencies up at once. He ends the post with some advantages of this approach and a takeaway or two to keep in mind when managing your object dependencies.

tagged: complexity service container accidental configuration simplex complex example symfony

Link: https://www.mpscholten.de/software-engineering/2016/05/21/accidental-complexity-caused-by-service-containers-in-the-php-world.html

TutsPlus.com:
Drupal 8: Properly Injecting Dependencies Using DI
May 20, 2016 @ 09:23:41

On the TutsPlus.com site today there's a new tutorial posted for the Drupal-ers out there showing you the right way to inject dependencies in a Drupal 8 application.

As I am sure you know by now, dependency injection (DI) and the Symfony service container are important new development features of Drupal 8. However, even though they are starting to be better understood in the Drupal development community, there is still some lack of clarity about how exactly to inject services into Drupal 8 classes.

They start by talking about how most of the current examples just show the static injection of dependencies but that that's not the only way. The article shows how to inject other services into existing services via a simple change to the service definitions. They also talk about "non-service classes" and injecting values there as well (including controllers, forms and plugins).

tagged: drupal8 inject dependency container dynamic static tutorial

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/drupal-8-properly-injecting-dependencies-using-di--cms-26314