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Building Your Startup: Notifying People of Meeting Updates
Oct 24, 2016 @ 10:37:50

On TutsPlus.com they've continued their series showing the construction of a startup (a calendaring site) using PHP and the Yii2 framework. In this latest article they walk you through their construction of a notification system when others need to be informed/invited to meetings in the system.

This tutorial is part of the Building Your Startup With PHP series on Envato Tuts+. In this series, I'm guiding you through launching a startup from concept to reality using my Meeting Planner app as a real-life example. [...] In this two-part series, I'll describe how we built the notifications infrastructure and their delivery. Today, I'm going to focus on the MeetingLog to track changes that help us determine when to send updates.

They start with their vision of how the notification system should work (starting at the UI level) and the types of responses an invited user could reply with. The article then gets into how the notifications will work and the creation of the first step: a log to track all actions taken around notifications. They include the model to work with the logging table, adding a new log message, defining the logging command and finding specific log messages. With that in place, the tutorial switches to the frontend, showing what the notifications should look like using flash messages and a few updates to the views in the application.

tagged: startup build tutorial series log message yii2 framework

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-your-startup-notifying-people-of-meeting-updates--cms-26594

Ez.no Blog:
Why PHP and Symfony, and Not Java
Oct 12, 2016 @ 11:17:05

On the Ez.no blog there's an interesting post comparing PHP and Symfony to Java and some of their own reasoning behind the choice of one over the other.

We are often asked, especially from our enterprise customers at financial institutions, why we decided to go with PHP and Symfony instead of a Java framework. And as we have actually re-considered alternatives both in 2007 and 2011, we know the answer pretty well. We also know firsthand how much PHP and the PHP ecosystem has matured and progressed the last few years, how Symfony2 and Composer provided a big jump forward, how PHP v7 and Symfony3 is positioned to provide the next, in the end making us very confident in our choice and in recommending it to others.

They then talk about some of the arguments of PHP versus Java, some that are pretty familiar to those in the PHP camp:

  • PHP is "just a scripting language"
  • Java is more scalable
  • PHP's performance is bad in comparison
  • Poor tools support for PHP

For each of these they link to more information and describe the current state of PHP and its ecosystem to help refute the claim. They then get into the Symfony portion, comparing it to similar Java frameworks, listing advantages like the large pool of Symfony developers and its vibrant community.

tagged: java language choice symfony framework misconception argument

Link: https://ez.no/Blog/Why-PHP-and-Symfony-and-not-Java

Master Zend Framework:
How to Begin Migrating From Zend Framework 2 to Zend Expressive
Oct 04, 2016 @ 12:29:21

The Master Zend Framework site has posted a new tutorial showing you how to start the process of migrating to Zend Expressive in your current from Zend Framework 2 application.

If you are managing one or more Zend Framework 2 applications, did you know that you can already begin porting them to Zend Expressive? In this tutorial, you will learn how you can start doing so today, using the Zend/PSR-7 bridge.

He starts with a little background on Zend Expressive and how it compares to Zend Framework 2. He also shares his opinions on the "just start from scratch" idea that's so tempting when migrating from one framework to another...that almost always leads to disaster. He then breaks down the migration process (using the zend-psr7bridge) into four steps, each with related code:

  • Create The Middleware Class
  • Initialize the Middleware
  • Configure the ServiceManager
  • Configure the Routes

He concludes with a few final thoughts about the migration from ZF2 to Expressive and how, with the help of this middleware setup, it can be a much smoother and easier transition.

tagged: migrate zendframework zendexpresssive psr7bridge tutorial framework introduction

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/migrate-from-zendframework2-to-zendexpressive/

Symfony Blog:
Symfony Reaches 500 Million Downloads
Sep 27, 2016 @ 12:09:06

The Symfony blog has posted an announcement about the major milestone the project has reached - the framework has passed 500 million downloads since the original release of the first versions of Symfony 2.

We did it! On September 26th, we achieved a huge milestone: 500 million Symfony packages have been downloaded by the PHP community! Thank you to the countless developers, contributors, companies, conferences and users that have made this massive number a reality. The Symfony ecosystem now consists of over 70 packages, several of which are downloaded, on average, over 50 thousand times every day!

The rest of the post talks about the road that lead to 500 million downloads, the pervasiveness of Symfony components and the work they've done on the Backwards Compatibility Promise and Continuous Upgrade Path. The post also includes several pictures members of the Symfony community took as the counter approached the 500 million mark.

tagged: symfony framework downloads 500million milestone reached community

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/symfony-reaches-500-million-downloads

SitePoint PHP Blog:
The past, Present and Future of the PHP-FIG
Sep 16, 2016 @ 13:17:40

On the SitePoint PHP blog Larry Garfield, a member of the PHP-FIG group, has written up an article covering the past, present and future of the PHP-FIG. In it he tries to give readers a perspective on where the group came from, some of the growth they've seen along the way and, finally, the proposal for PHP-FIG 3.0 - a restructuring of the organization based on things they've learned so far.

The PHP Framework Interoperability Group (PHP-FIG, or just FIG for short) is at a crossroads. Many electrons have been sacrificed talking about FIG’s tribulations of late, but sadly much of it has been FUD, with little effort spent on the positive. At SitePoint’s invitation, I’d like to offer a more positive outlook on FIG and the PHP community, and demonstrate why FIG can, and should, continue to have a positive impact on the PHP ecosystem.

He starts with where the group began (an "uncomfortable beginning") at php[tek] 2015 and the proposal/passing of the PSR-0 autoloading specification soon after. He then gets into the "slow but steady growth" the group had over the next several years and some of the groups that became involved (not just framework projects either). He covers some of the other PSRs created/passed, the impact they've made on the community and the growing pains they've gone through. He ends the post talking about the PHP-FIG 3.0 proposal and some of the support, opposition and discussion that has come along with that.

tagged: phpfig article past present future organization framework interoperability phpfig3

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/the-past-present-and-future-of-the-php-fig/

Building Your Startup With PHP: Email Commands
Sep 15, 2016 @ 11:22:40

TutsPlus.com has continued their "Building Your Startup with PHP" series in this latest tutorial covering the use of email commands in their "Meeting Planner" example application.

This tutorial is part of the Building Your Startup With PHP series on Envato Tuts+. In this series, I'm guiding you through launching a startup from concept to reality using my Meeting Planner app as a real-life example. [...] In the last tutorial, we began emailing meeting invitations which included numerous links for participants to respond, i.e. view the meeting page, accept all places and times, reject a place or time, etc.

In this tutorial, I'll review how I chose to construct and process those links in a secure, functional manner.

He then starts in on the idea of "commands" explaining a bit about what they are and what kind of commands are needed for the planner application. Code is included to create some of these commands and how to integrate them into the rest of the Yii-framework based application.

tagged: startup build tutorial series email command yii framework

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-your-startup-with-php-email-commands--cms-23288

Understanding the Laravel Service Container
Sep 13, 2016 @ 12:56:04

The Dotdev.co blog has posted a tutorial for the Laravel users out there with the goal of helping you understand the Laravel service container, a key part of the framework's functionality and an extensible feature you can adapt to some of your own needs.

Learning how to build an application with Laravel is not just about learning to use the different classes and components within the framework, it is not about remembering all artisan commands or remembering all helper functions (we have Google for that). Learning to code with Laravel is learning the philosophy of Laravel, its elegance and its beautiful syntax. I personally feel it is an art and a craft (its not a coincidence that Laravel developers are sometimes referred to as Web artisans). This is true for any other framework as well.

A major part of Laravel’s philosophy is the Service Container or IoC container. As a Laravel developer, understanding and using the Service Container properly is a crucial part in mastering your craft, as it is the core of any Laravel application.

The post starts with some of the basics about the container and how objects/instances are bound to it. They give an example of binding a FooService class in the "register" methods of providers. A code example is also included showing how to use the service you previously bound. There's also a description of binding interfaces in the IoC, making it easier for custom classes to resolve interfaces when they're implemented. The post wraps up with a bit covering the resolving of dependencies and the code you'll need to set them up.

tagged: laravel service container introduction tutorial framework bind

Link: https://dotdev.co/understanding-laravel-service-container-bd488ca05280#.9gd6v3t4l

Symfony Blog:
The Road to 500 Million Symfony Downloads
Sep 09, 2016 @ 10:31:58

On the Symfony blog there's a new post about a major upcoming milestone for the framework: their 500 millionth download of version 2.0 of the framework.

Symfony 2.0 was released on July 28th, 2011. The biggest difference from Symfony 1.x was the internal architecture of the framework, which was designed around a set of stand-alone and decoupled PHP packages called Symfony Components.

In the five years since it's initial release the download count is getting closer to the 500 million mark all the time. They've even provided a real-time(ish) dashboard of the current count so you can keep track yourself if you'd like. The post also asks the Symfony users out there to share some of their own photos on Twitter of when the milestone is reached and even offers potential prizes to those that participate (a raffle).

So talk to your work mates, prepare a way to display symfony.com/500million in your office and share some photos of the moment so you get a chance to win. And while we wait for the moment ... keep downloading those Symfony packages!
tagged: fivehundred million downloads symfony framework components

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/the-road-to-500-million-symfony-downloads

Matt Stauffer:
What's up with Laravel: Up and Running?
Sep 05, 2016 @ 12:17:35

Matt Stauffer has been busy writing a book to help people get "Up and Running" with the Laravel framework. However, life has caused delays (in the form of a new little girl) but he's back with an update on the book's status and some answers to frequently asked questions about it.

It's been a tumultuous summer, what with Stauffer Child #2 arriving and me finally finishing Laravel: Up and Running. A lot of folks have been asking me about timelines for the book, so let me share what we have here.

He talks about how, despite finishing the actual writing of the book already, the other things that came up added some delays to the final version being ready (like the baby and Laravel v5.3). He wanted the latest from 5.3 to be in the book, so portions were added and updated to include them. For those that just can't wait, there's already a pre-release version you can buy or you can wait until the October/November release date. He ends the post answering a few questions covering who the book is for, what version of Laravel it's for and what it offers that the documentation can't.

tagged: laravel upandrunning book timeline community framework

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/whats-up-with-laravel-up-and-running

Phil Sturgeon:
PHP-FIG: 3.0 or Rebrand
Aug 31, 2016 @ 10:38:01

Phil Sturgeon has a new post to his site giving a brief overview of the state of the PHP-FIG, the v3.0 proposal that's been put out and sharing some of his own thoughts on both.

I was involved in the PHP-FIG since 2012, and I have seen every conversation, been part of every decision, and know the reasoning for a lot of stuff, regardless of the result and my person preferences. Being so involved with this group for so long, I have a fair bit of context that other people are lacking.

The latest of about four large conversations in the FIG is: whether or not a new organization should take its place. Seeing it framed in this way is odd, because I'm not sure anyone is literally proposing that.

Phil covers some of the background behind the PHP-FIG group including some of the original goals and how it grew well beyond the "framework" part of its name. He talks about some of the reasons he sees that the group has stayed around. Then he gets into the FIG v3.0 proposal - a relaunch of the group with a different structure and different way of getting things done (after learning from some of the mistakes in the current group). He also talks about the other elephant (elePHPant?) in the room: whether this new structure calls for a new group to be formed or if the PHP-FIG should just adapt and move on.

It will be interesting to see how this all shakes out in the end but the PHP-FIG group has, undoubtedly, helped to usher in a lot of the "modern PHP" work we see in the community now especially when it comes to things like Composer, logger structure and middleware handling.

tagged: phpfig v3 proposal organization structure framework psr

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/php/2016/08/30/php-fig-3-0-or-rebrand/