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The Bakery:
Welcoming Phinx to the CakePHP family!
Jun 23, 2017 @ 09:54:02

On The Bakery (the CakePHP site) an official announcement has been posted welcoming Phinx to the CakePHP family. The Phinx library is a popular tool for framework-agnostic database migration handling.

We are very excited to announce that Phinx has joined the CakePHP team. The Github project has already been moved to the CakePHP organisation. The project itself will stay MIT-licensed but be gradually transformed into a Cake Software Foundation project. Other great news is that the current way to install and update Phinx remains unchanged.

As you are aware, CakePHP has been using Phinx since 3.0.0 for database migrations. The CakePHP Core team welcomes the opportunity to look after and maintain the project and will now start making changes to bring the code in line with the CakePHP (our) coding standards. As well as cleaning up issues and PR’s soon. We will be following up with our plans for the code and setting roadmaps in the coming weeks.

Rob Morgan, the original author of the library has also added some of his own commentary in a post to his site:

I’ve been busy lately. Juggling startups and open source work is no easy feat. I managed to do it for the past 5 years, but beyond 30 its proving to be more difficult. Phinx is not accelerating at the pace I’d like it to be. In fact so far this year we’ve only managed to ship 6 releases. I decided that the best strategy moving forwards is to find a new home for Phinx. One that has an active and loyal community and one that delivers great software. I’m pleased to announce that I’ve found the right fit.

He points out that the only real thing changing for now is the location of the repository. He looks back on the journey that got him and the project to where it is today and how much the support from the PHP community meant during that time.

tagged: cakephp phinx database migration robmorgan library project foundation

Link: https://bakery.cakephp.org/2017/06/23/welcoming-phinx-to-the-cakephp-family.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Zend Framework and PHP 7.1
Jun 07, 2017 @ 12:18:45

On the Zend Framework blog Matthew Weier O'Phinney has a new post covering the state of the Zend Framework project and how it relates to PHP 7.1.

When we announced Zend Framework 3 last year, one of the changes was setting the minimum supported PHP version to 5.6. Our initial plan was to support 5.6 until it reaches end-of-life, which occurs 31 December 2018.

PHP 5.6, however, stopped receiving active support almost five months ago, on 19 Jan 2017. This means that it is no longer receiving bugfixes, only critical security fixes. As such, a number of contributors have been pushing for us to up our minimum supported version to support only actively supported PHP versions, which would mean only PHP 7 versions.

[...] Our view is that the new features in PHP 7 will allow us to simplify our code dramatically, reduce bugs (primarily by increasing type safety), make our code more easily maintainable (less code required to check types; less repetitive code), provide stronger and more predictable interfaces to our users, and simultaneously provide users access to more and better language features.

He also talks briefly about their thoughts about HHVM support and if it makes sense to keep moving forward with it (given the small percentage of their user base). He then lays out a plan for the framework moving forward that includes the release of PHP 7.1+ only components and security patches on 5.6 versions until end of life.

tagged: zendframework php71 version future roadmap php56 hhvm project

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-06-06-zf-php-7-1.html

php[architect]:
Artisanal: Project Creation
May 18, 2017 @ 11:59:12

On the php[architect] site they've shared an article originally from the May 2016 issue of the magazine by Joe Ferguson: Artisanal: Project Creation (also released as a free PDF).

Every developer has a set way of starting a new project. Most frameworks have a linear path to getting started, and Laravel is no exception. With a few commands, you can quickly get started configuring routes, writing controllers, and saving data in a database.

In the article Joe walks you through the tools and commands that come with the Laravel framework to make getting up and running quickly easier. He covers tools available for both the backend and frontend functionality as well as testing (mentioning Dusk), routing, middleware groups and database functionality.

tagged: phparchitect magazine free article project creation laravel artisan

Link: https://www.phparch.com/2017/05/artisanal-project-creation/

Derick Rethans:
15 years of Xdebug
May 10, 2017 @ 10:27:14

In a recent post the fifteenth anniversary of the XDebug PHP debugging tool was celebrated and lead developer Derick Rethans was presented with several tokens of appreciation from the PHP community. In this new post to his site he shares the experience (it was a surprise after all) from his perspective and thanks those involved.

This article was going to be about some upcoming features in the 2.6 release. Or rather, I was hoping to announce at least a beta release of Xdebug 2.6. Unfortunately, I couldn't find enough time to work on all the issues that I wanted, although I've made a little progress.

What I can write about, is a little mystery.

He talks about the initial invite from James Titcumb to meet him at his favorite whisky store and the eight special bottles that the community purchased to show their appreciation for his hard fifteen years of work on this invaluable tool. He lists out the types for those interested and some of the messages from contributors showing their appreciation. He thanks all of those involved.

And on the Xdebug front, there are plenty of bugs to fix, features to add for Xdebug 2.6, and undoubtedly Dmitry will be "breaking" some things in PHP 7.2 that I need to support in Xdebug as well.
tagged: fifteen years anniversary derickrethans xdebug debugging tool project whiskey

Link: https://derickrethans.nl/xdebug-15.html

Matt Stauffer:
What happens to Laravel if Taylor Otwell disappears?
May 09, 2017 @ 11:52:25

In this post to his site Matt Stauffer poses an interesting question around one of the more popular PHP frameworks these days. He wonders "what would happen to Laravel if Taylor Otwell disappears?"

After we talked a bit about enterprise apps on the Laravel Podcast the other day , a few folks in the Laravel community have been talking about what makes a tool enterprise-ready. I have a lot of thoughts about support plans, SLAs, and other such features of "enterprise-readiness", but I'll save those for a later date. Today, let's talk about the easiest-to-dismiss concern: What happens if Taylor disappears suddenly?

This question brings up the point that, unlike a framework backed by a company, a framework backed by an individual relies on that individual's desire and ability to keep the project running. What happens if Taylor decides he wants to retire and be a goat farmer?

He shares the plan that's already been set in place with Jeffrey Way (of Laracasts) being the next in line to head up the project. He also mentions the Laravel, LLC company that wouldn't go away if Taylor did and how the community would fit in.

tagged: laravel taylorotwell project leader jeffreyway company community

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/what-happens-to-laravel-if-taylor-otwell-disappears

Tomas Votruba:
Why Is Doctrine Dying
Apr 04, 2017 @ 13:13:45

In a recent post to his site Tomas Votruba shares some of his opinions about why he thinks that Doctrine is dying sharing three of the reasons he sees for this trend.

Do you use Doctrine ORM? If so, do you follow its evolution on Github? Symfony is evolving, Laravel is evolving, Nette is evolving, world is evolving... Doctrine not. Today I will show you 3 reasons why.

I've been thinking over 2 years about this post. I wasn't sure if it's only negative hype feeling or real thing. It's still the same so it's time to write about it.

He starts off by stating that Doctrine is "an awesome tool" but suggests that it is stuck in its legacy world and hasn't been able to evolve much past some of its original functionality. In his opinion this is because of the project's "system setup" not the code quality or maintainers. He then offers the Doctrine project three suggestions on what they could do to help change the course of the project. This includes becoming more competition to other options and consolidating the 20+ Doctrine repositories down to a much simpler structure.

tagged: doctrine project dying opinion suggestion

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2017/03/27/why-is-doctrine-dying/

Rob Allen:
Using CircleCI for a PHP project
Apr 03, 2017 @ 09:56:20

In a post to his site Rob Allen shares a basic setup for using Circle CI with a PHP project for continuous integration. Circle CI provides the resources to build your project and perform tasks such as run unit tests or even deploy the resulting code to the production environment.

For a new client project, I've decided to use CircleCI to run my tests every time I push to GitHub. This turned out to be quite easy; this is how I did it.

He shares the contents of his .circleci/config.yml configuration file creating a Docker environment each time the build is executed, installing the required software, executing Composer install and running PHPCS and PHPUnit tests. He shares an example of the output from a build and how he hooked in Slack to receive notifications when the builds were complete (and pass/fail status).

tagged: circleci service continuous integration project tutorial configuration docker

Link: https://akrabat.com/using-circleci-for-a-php-project/

Nikola Posa:
Keep PhpStorm metadata away from project sources
Mar 15, 2017 @ 11:54:57

In a new post to his site Nikola Posa shows the PHPStorm users out there how to keep metadata about your projects away from the source (the content in the ./idea directory it creates by default).

I fell in love with PhpStorm only few months ago ago when I switched from NetBeans, my favorite IDE by then. One thing that I was missing from the very start is the ability to separate project metadata (.idea/ directory) from sources, because I like to keep away everything that is unnecessary from my project directory, as well as from the .gitignore file. It turned out that something like that is possible, but in contrast to NetBeans it's not so evident and requires a little more effort

It's a pretty simple four step process and he shows what settings to change:

  • Create new project in a directory where you would usually keep metadata
  • Open Settings / Preferences dialog and click on Directories node
  • Click Add Content Root button and select project sources directory
  • Remove content root that keeps project metadata

Screenshots are also included for each step to help make sure you're in the right place at all times.

tagged: phpstorm metadata project source setting configuration

Link: http://blog.nikolaposa.in.rs/2017/03/09/phpstorm-metadata-away-from-project-sources/

Ondrej Mirtes:
How I Got From 0 to 1 000 Stars on GitHub in Three Months With My Open Source Side Pr
Mar 08, 2017 @ 10:37:39

Ondrej Mirtes has offered some advice in this Medium.com post sharing some of his experience in the development and management of his PHPStan project (static analysis for bug detection).

Most developers have side projects. That's how we try out new things or make something that we miss on the market or in our dev stack. But most side projects end up unfinished and never actually see the light of day. And even if a developer builds up the courage to show his work to the public, he quickly finds out that just publishing a repository doesn't actually bring the masses to his doorstep.

At the beginning of last December, I released PHPStan? - ?static analysis tool for PHP that focuses on finding bugs. The project gained a lot of traction resulting in currently over 1 300 stars on GitHub and more than 30 000 downloads on Packagist.

He spends the rest of the article sharing the things he did to make sure that the project "didn't end up in the dustbin of history" and be successful. Topics include:

  • Build the hard stuff first
  • Serve market needs
  • Promotion
  • Ask for money

He ends with what he sees as the most important part of any good open source project - as a maintainer you need to "be nice". This means being responsive to incoming feedback, keeping in mind that people contribute/comment because they care about the project (and it's not usually about you).

tagged: opensource project advice phpstan needs promotion money nice

Link: https://medium.com/@ondrejmirtes/how-i-got-from-0-to-1-000-stars-on-github-in-three-months-with-my-open-source-side-project-8ffe4725146#.wihwnsy8u

Jason McCreary:
Lumen is dead. Long live Lumen.
Feb 28, 2017 @ 15:17:59

In a new post to his site Jason McCreary offers some of his opinions around why he thinks Lumen is dying. Lumen is a micro-framework from the creators of Laravel offered as an alternative to the full-on Laravel framework.

You’ve already read the title, so I’ll just say it, I think Lumen is dying, if not already dead. Now let me tell you why…

Jason (creator of Laravel Shift) shares some of his own statistics around Laravel versus Lumen "shifts" and some graphs that help to support the theory. He suggests that part of the issue is that there's less focus on a wider, more general use of the tool and how he suspects that the Lumen feature set will continue to lessen. He ends on a more positive note, though, suggesting that Lumen as it stands may not exist in the future but may live on integrated into the Laravel framework.

tagged: lumen project laravel dead opinion

Link: https://jason.pureconcepts.net/2017/02/lumen-is-dead-long-live-lumen/