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Cal Evans:
My Journey Into Mautic
Jun 07, 2017 @ 09:09:32

Cal Evans, in a search to help make the marketing efforts for some of his products easier, has kicked off a series showing how to install and configure the PHP-based Mautic marketing automation platform.

Those that know me know that I have an obsession with marketing. I mean I’m no good at it, but the topic fascinates me. Almost all of the podcasts I listen to on a regular basis are marketing related. One topic in particular that interests me is “Marketing Automation”. Marketing Automation covers a huge swath of topics and since I am not an expert at the, I won’t attempt to explain them.

[...] Because I am interested in Marketing Automation and want to start applying the techniques in the projects I run. I started looking around for vendors who could provide these services. What I found is that most SaaS vendors assume that everybody who wants to use their software has deep pockets.

Without these "deep pockets" (pricey services) at his disposal, Cal looked for other options and found the self-hosted Mautic instead. He starts with a definition of his requirements including that it should be Open Source, that it should integrate with WordPress and he can contribute back to the project. He ends the post by outlining his planned platform using Mautic, WordPress, Mailgun, Mailchimp and Ditigal Ocean.

tagged: mautic marketing platform opensource series part1 automation

Link: https://blog.calevans.com/2017/06/03/my-journey-into-mautic/

Robert Basic:
Open source taught me how to work with legacy code
May 01, 2017 @ 09:36:29

In a new post to his site Robert Basic shares how some of his work on Open Source projects taught him how to better work with legacy code.

Contributing to open source projects has many benefits — you learn and you teach, you can make friends or find business partners, you might get a chance to travel. Even have a keynote at a conference, like Gary did.

Contributing to open source projects was the best decision I made in my professional career. Just because I contributed to, and blogged about Zend Framework, I ended up working and consulting for a company for four and a half years. I learned a lot during that time.

He shares some of the things that open source taught him about working with code and how it relates back to legacy code (including how to find his way around). He also tries to dispel the myth that all legacy code is bad and was "written by a bunch of code monkeys who know nothing about writing good software." He points out that, at the time the code was written, the changes may have been the best that could be done, it might be a necessary workaround or it could be an actual bug that needs fixing.

tagged: opensource legacy code opinion experience codemonkey

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/open-source-taught-me-how-to-work-with-legacy-code/

Ondrej Mirtes:
How I Got From 0 to 1 000 Stars on GitHub in Three Months With My Open Source Side Pr
Mar 08, 2017 @ 10:37:39

Ondrej Mirtes has offered some advice in this Medium.com post sharing some of his experience in the development and management of his PHPStan project (static analysis for bug detection).

Most developers have side projects. That's how we try out new things or make something that we miss on the market or in our dev stack. But most side projects end up unfinished and never actually see the light of day. And even if a developer builds up the courage to show his work to the public, he quickly finds out that just publishing a repository doesn't actually bring the masses to his doorstep.

At the beginning of last December, I released PHPStan? - ?static analysis tool for PHP that focuses on finding bugs. The project gained a lot of traction resulting in currently over 1 300 stars on GitHub and more than 30 000 downloads on Packagist.

He spends the rest of the article sharing the things he did to make sure that the project "didn't end up in the dustbin of history" and be successful. Topics include:

  • Build the hard stuff first
  • Serve market needs
  • Promotion
  • Ask for money

He ends with what he sees as the most important part of any good open source project - as a maintainer you need to "be nice". This means being responsive to incoming feedback, keeping in mind that people contribute/comment because they care about the project (and it's not usually about you).

tagged: opensource project advice phpstan needs promotion money nice

Link: https://medium.com/@ondrejmirtes/how-i-got-from-0-to-1-000-stars-on-github-in-three-months-with-my-open-source-side-project-8ffe4725146#.wihwnsy8u

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Voyager – Can an Admin UI Make Laravel Even More Approachable?
Jan 12, 2017 @ 09:23:37

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted an article from Claudio Ribero highlighting an administration UI specifically designed for Laravel applications: Voyager.

Voyager is a Laravel package that provides a full administration system for the framework in its “skeleton app” form. Voyager has 4 main features: Media Manager, Menu Builder, Database Manager and Bread/CRUD builder.

He first walks you through the process of getting a new Laravel application up and running then pulling in the tcp/voyager package. He shows how to update your app configuration to integrate it then install it. Once you've performed these steps you'll have a /admin portion of your site up and ready to go with the default login. With that all set up Claudio gets into the specifics for use of each of the components (listed above) in the package, including screenshots and code where helpful.

tagged: voyager administration interface laravel opensource tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/voyager-can-an-admin-interface-make-laravel-even-more-approachable/

Laravel News:
24 Pull Requests
Dec 01, 2016 @ 10:31:21

On the Laravel News site there's a post talking about a holiday-themed project, 24 Pull Requests, and a bit of personal perspective about it from a participant, Joe Ferguson (of LaraTraining.com).

24 Pull Requests is a project to promote open source collaboration during the month of December. The idea is to “Send 24 pull requests between December 1st and December 24th,” and it encourages developers to give back to open source with little gifts of code.

This is the fourth year and there are currently 11,093 developers and 10,201 organizations participating. If you are new to open source or are a seasoned pro it’s a great way of supporting the community.

The remainder of the post is the interview with Joe sharing answers to questions about:

  • why he decided to start participating
  • how it has improved his skills
  • what his biggest take away from participation is

There's plenty of links and suggestions in the post too helping you get started on your own road to 24PullRequests this month.

tagged: 24pullrequests project interview joeferguson opensource pullrequest

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/11/24-pull-requests/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Pay the Price for Open Source
Nov 25, 2016 @ 15:18:18

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post from the godfather of the PHP community Cal Evans about paying the price for open source - giving back to Open Source projects that you use every day.

Back in the early days of Open Source – when Dinosaurs roamed the earth and Rasmus was a young man – there were two types of open source projects we talked about: those that didn’t cost any money, and those that gave you the freedom to redistribute and modify the code.

[...] Fast forward a few dozen years and here we are, Open Source is now an ecosystem, not a user group that you and five friends attend, or a magazine to which you subscribe. The problem is that most of us have stopped talking about the different types of open source, we just assume it is both.

He talks about how PHP is technically both kinds of free but also points out that open source will potentially die out (as it is now) without one major piece - users contributing back, giving their time and effort to keep it (and related projects) free. He talks about how you can give back, and not necessarily monetarily. He talks about one of his own experiences with giving back (to WordPress) when his work wasn't accepted, but he also points out that even though it may be rejected it doesn't mean you should stop.

What ever project you are working with, take the time to give back. Don’t let Open Source die in our generation.

Preserve this great concept; this ecosystem that we have helped build and that has allowed us to build so much. If you are a developer, find your favorite project and give back. If you run a company or a team of developers, give them time on your dime to give back to a project. Help keep the Open Source ecosystem thriving for the next generation of developers.

tagged: opensource pay price giveback contribute opinion

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/pay-the-price-for-open-source/

CodeForALiving.io:
How I Open Sourced My Way to My Dream Job: Mohamed Said
Oct 17, 2016 @ 10:15:19

On the CodeForALiving.io site (from StackOverflow) there's an interview with Mohamed Said, the first official employee for Laravel (and its related ecosystem).

Mohamed Said got his first computer at age 13—they were just becoming commonly accessible in Egypt—and started learning to code almost immediately. Flash was what drew him in, he says, with its animations and color and, well, “flashy” stuff.

[...] Last month, Mohamed Said became the first full-time hire at Laravel, an open source PHP framework built by Taylor Otwell. Otwell built the framework as a side project, and when it took off, quit his job to work on it full time. Just a few months ago, he decided he needed help maintaining the project and posted his first full-time job opening, and Said was an obvious choice.

The interview gets into some of Mohamed's background as a developer and his own personal experiences with the Laravel framework. The article then moves on to some of his work in open source software and how he grew into the Laravel community overall. He talks some about roadblocks he came up against along the way but encourages people to contribute, mentioning both the growth it can provide and how to get started with your own contributions.

tagged: opensource mohamedsaid laravel employee developer interview story

Link: http://www.codeforaliving.io/how-i-open-sourced-my-way-to-my-dream-job-mohamed-said

Community News:
DigitalOcean's Hacktoberfest 2016
Sep 29, 2016 @ 09:46:57

It's that time of year again - the perfect time to get involved in Open Source. Why? Because DigitalOcean is back with Hacktoberfest once again, encouraging contributions to Open Source no matter the size.

The Laravel News site sums it up nicely:

Hacktoberfest, the month-long festival of code, is back again this year. The event is hosted in partnership between GitHub and DigitalOcean, and the rules are simple. If you make four pull requests between October 1st and October 31st, you’ll get a t-shirt. It’s available worldwide with no stipulations.

While the real incentive is to get more contributions to Open Source project, there's also a side benefit for those that get in their four pull requests during October: a cool t-shirt bearing the logo for this year's event. All you have to do is contribute and four pull requests to any repository (not your own ideally) before the end of October. If you're not sure of where to start and need some ideas, the Hacktoberfest site has you covered with some great suggestions to get you started.

tagged: hacktoberfest digitalocean github community opensource contribution

Link: https://hacktoberfest.digitalocean.com/

Kyle Mitchell:
The MIT License, Line by Line
Sep 27, 2016 @ 09:53:11

If you've been working with open source software for any amount of time, chances are you've seen licenses attached to the projects you've used (or even contributed to). There's quite a few of them out there and it can be confusing as to what's actually covered by them and how it effects you directly. In this recent post to Kyle E. Mitchell's site he explains, line-by-line, one of the most common Open Source licenses: the MIT license.

The MIT License is the most popular open-source software license. Here’s one read of it, line by line.

If you’re involved in open-source software and haven’t taken the time to read the license from top to bottom—it’s only 171 words—you need to do so now. Especially if licenses aren’t your day-to-day. Make a mental note of anything that seems off or unclear, and keep trucking. I’ll repeat every word again, in chunks and in order, with context and commentary. But it’s important to have the whole in mind.

He then walks you through the different sections of the license, explaining what it all means:

  • License title (header)
  • Copyright notice (header)
  • Grant scope (license grant)
  • Conditions (license grant)
  • Attribution notice, warranty disclaimer and limitation of liability

There's a lot of detail here but in the end you'll definitely understand the license in and out. He ends the post with links to a few other resources that have helped him better understand source licenses.

tagged: mit license opensource detail linebyline explanation

Link: https://writing.kemitchell.com/2016/09/21/MIT-License-Line-by-Line.html

The Changelog Podcast:
RFC #4: Jan Lehnardt – Building Healthy Communities
Aug 22, 2016 @ 09:41:22

On The Changelog podcast hosts Nadia and Mikeal are joined by Jan Lehnardt to talk about building healthy communities around software and Open Source projects.

On today’s show Nadia and Mikeal are joined by Jan Lehnardt to discuss the value of building healthy communities to reduce burden on maintainers and create sustainable projects, how healthy communities help grow a project, and contributor models.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 for the show directly. If you enjoy the show and want to hear more from the podcast, be sure to follow their feed for more shows and articles as they're released.

tagged: changelog podcast rfc4 episode janlehnardt community opensource

Link: https://changelog.com/rfc-4/