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How I Open Sourced My Way to My Dream Job: Mohamed Said
Oct 17, 2016 @ 10:15:19

On the CodeForALiving.io site (from StackOverflow) there's an interview with Mohamed Said, the first official employee for Laravel (and its related ecosystem).

Mohamed Said got his first computer at age 13—they were just becoming commonly accessible in Egypt—and started learning to code almost immediately. Flash was what drew him in, he says, with its animations and color and, well, “flashy” stuff.

[...] Last month, Mohamed Said became the first full-time hire at Laravel, an open source PHP framework built by Taylor Otwell. Otwell built the framework as a side project, and when it took off, quit his job to work on it full time. Just a few months ago, he decided he needed help maintaining the project and posted his first full-time job opening, and Said was an obvious choice.

The interview gets into some of Mohamed's background as a developer and his own personal experiences with the Laravel framework. The article then moves on to some of his work in open source software and how he grew into the Laravel community overall. He talks some about roadblocks he came up against along the way but encourages people to contribute, mentioning both the growth it can provide and how to get started with your own contributions.

tagged: opensource mohamedsaid laravel employee developer interview story

Link: http://www.codeforaliving.io/how-i-open-sourced-my-way-to-my-dream-job-mohamed-said

Community News:
DigitalOcean's Hacktoberfest 2016
Sep 29, 2016 @ 09:46:57

It's that time of year again - the perfect time to get involved in Open Source. Why? Because DigitalOcean is back with Hacktoberfest once again, encouraging contributions to Open Source no matter the size.

The Laravel News site sums it up nicely:

Hacktoberfest, the month-long festival of code, is back again this year. The event is hosted in partnership between GitHub and DigitalOcean, and the rules are simple. If you make four pull requests between October 1st and October 31st, you’ll get a t-shirt. It’s available worldwide with no stipulations.

While the real incentive is to get more contributions to Open Source project, there's also a side benefit for those that get in their four pull requests during October: a cool t-shirt bearing the logo for this year's event. All you have to do is contribute and four pull requests to any repository (not your own ideally) before the end of October. If you're not sure of where to start and need some ideas, the Hacktoberfest site has you covered with some great suggestions to get you started.

tagged: hacktoberfest digitalocean github community opensource contribution

Link: https://hacktoberfest.digitalocean.com/

Kyle Mitchell:
The MIT License, Line by Line
Sep 27, 2016 @ 09:53:11

If you've been working with open source software for any amount of time, chances are you've seen licenses attached to the projects you've used (or even contributed to). There's quite a few of them out there and it can be confusing as to what's actually covered by them and how it effects you directly. In this recent post to Kyle E. Mitchell's site he explains, line-by-line, one of the most common Open Source licenses: the MIT license.

The MIT License is the most popular open-source software license. Here’s one read of it, line by line.

If you’re involved in open-source software and haven’t taken the time to read the license from top to bottom—it’s only 171 words—you need to do so now. Especially if licenses aren’t your day-to-day. Make a mental note of anything that seems off or unclear, and keep trucking. I’ll repeat every word again, in chunks and in order, with context and commentary. But it’s important to have the whole in mind.

He then walks you through the different sections of the license, explaining what it all means:

  • License title (header)
  • Copyright notice (header)
  • Grant scope (license grant)
  • Conditions (license grant)
  • Attribution notice, warranty disclaimer and limitation of liability

There's a lot of detail here but in the end you'll definitely understand the license in and out. He ends the post with links to a few other resources that have helped him better understand source licenses.

tagged: mit license opensource detail linebyline explanation

Link: https://writing.kemitchell.com/2016/09/21/MIT-License-Line-by-Line.html

The Changelog Podcast:
RFC #4: Jan Lehnardt – Building Healthy Communities
Aug 22, 2016 @ 09:41:22

On The Changelog podcast hosts Nadia and Mikeal are joined by Jan Lehnardt to talk about building healthy communities around software and Open Source projects.

On today’s show Nadia and Mikeal are joined by Jan Lehnardt to discuss the value of building healthy communities to reduce burden on maintainers and create sustainable projects, how healthy communities help grow a project, and contributor models.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 for the show directly. If you enjoy the show and want to hear more from the podcast, be sure to follow their feed for more shows and articles as they're released.

tagged: changelog podcast rfc4 episode janlehnardt community opensource

Link: https://changelog.com/rfc-4/

Lorna Mitchell:
Joind.In Needs Help
Aug 16, 2016 @ 09:57:41

Lorna Mitchell has a post to her site sharing a "call for help" related to the open source project she's a lead on: http://joind.in (a popular conference rating/feedback site in wide use across the PHP community). In her post she asks for help with the project and how you can help continue the success of the project/service.

This post is about the open source project, Joind.in. Joind.in is a tool to allow attendees at conferences or other events to offer immediate public feedback to speakers and organisers at those events. Joind.in is an open source project run by volunteers. For the last 6 years I've been a maintainer of this project, following a year or two of being a contributor. Over the last few months, myself and my comaintainer Rob Allen have been mostly inactive due to other commitments, and we have agreed it's time to step aside and let others take up the baton.

She then lists some of the things the project needs help in including:

  • manually check and approve events (the volume of spam we get is surprising, events are manually approved)
  • review and merge pull requests across the repos in [the project's] Github organisation
  • maintain the issue tracker, keeping it tidy and tagging issues, replicating bugs
  • managing the @joindin twitter account - responding to questions and we often like to tweet to promote events and CfPs as well

She ends the post with an update for those that wonder if this is "abandoning" the project, reinforcing that focuses have shifted more to "keeping the lights on" rather than abandoning the project overall.

Open source is most powerful when we pursue our passions and my journey as a speaker and event host over the last 8 years or so would have looked very different without joind.in. [...] If the project isn't important, it will keep on winding down. If it is important, the community will pick it up - this wasn't originally my project, and now it is time to hand it forward.
tagged: joindin project opensource assistance help lornamitchell

Link: http://lornajane.net/posts/2016/joind-in-needs-help

The Changelog Podcast:
#211: Open Source at Facebook with James Pearce
Jul 15, 2016 @ 10:43:46

There's an interesting new episode of The Changelog podcast that's been posted today featuring James Pearce, head of Open Source at Facebook. They talk about Facebook's stance on open source and contributing along with the support they give.

This week we’ve got a big show with James Pearce, Head of Open Source at Facebook, to talk about that very subject — open source at Facebook. We talked about his path to software development, why he’s the person to lead open source at Facebook, their view on open source, their culture of open source, how they choose what to open source, and more importantly — how they focus on, support, and nurture the community.

You can listen to this episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to get notified when new shows are released.

tagged: thechangelog podcast ep211 facebook opensource jamespearce

Link: https://changelog.com/211/

Ben Ramsey:
Introducing Ramsey/UUID
Apr 25, 2016 @ 10:52:14

In a new post to his site Ben Ramsey finally gets around to posting about a library of his that's not only already widely used but has already been around for a few years - his ramsey/uuid library for generating UUIDs.

It seems quite absurd for me to introduce ramsey/uuid, a library that saw its 1.0.0 release on July 19, 2012, and is now at version 3.4.1, having had 35 releases since its first, but what’s even more ludicrous is that I haven’t once blogged about this library. I mention it only in passing in my “Dates Are Hard” post. So, allow me to introduce you to perhaps a familiar face, an old friend, the ramsey/uuid library for PHP.

He starts with some of the original beginnings of the language back when Composer usage was just first taking off. He'd found other UUID implementations in PHP but none that rivaled the features found in library for other languages. He then briefly explains what a UUID is and what the RFC defines them as. He talks about the name change on the package (from the "Rhumsaa" namespace to "Ramsey") and an issue he received where UUIDs were colliding...as well as how he corrected it. He wraps up the post looking at some of what's coming for the library and what kind of improvements he'll be making in v3.4.1 and beyond.

tagged: ramsey uuid library introduction version opensource project rhumsaa improvement

Link: https://benramsey.com/blog/2016/04/ramsey-uuid/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Sourcehunt #4 – Reflection, Authorization, Crons, and more
Feb 29, 2016 @ 11:18:04

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the latest in their "Sourcehunt" series of posts highlighting several open source libraries across a wide range of topics they find notable: Sourcehunt #4.

We skipped January’s Sourcehunt, but we’re back now, ready to boost the stardom of more projects!

Libraries included in this latest Sourcehunt include:

Each item in the list comes with a bit of detail around what the library is and what kinds of features it provides. There's also a few other links included to alternatives and resources about the libraries.

tagged: sourcehunt ep4 opensource library feature sitepoint

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/sourcehunt-4-reflection-authorization-crons-and-more/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Contributing to Open Source: Gatekeeper Case Study
Feb 23, 2016 @ 09:31:41

On the SitePoint PHP blog editor Bruno Skvorc has a post sharing some of his experience contributing to an open source PHP project and the flow he followed to add in a new feature. The project in question is Gatekeeper, an "all in one", framework-agnostic solution for user authentication and authorization.

GateKeeper is a pretty nifty user registration, authentication and authorization library which uses its own database to store and query the user records. This means that it’s completely decoupled from your main app (so you can, essentially, use Postgre or Mongo for your business logic while using a completely different engine like MySQL for basic user records) and easy to tweak and extend.

[...] This post isn’t about Gatekeeper per-se, though. It’s about contributing to open source, and going about the right way to doing it.

He then breaks the rest of the post up into a few different steps in the contribution flow:

  • Step 1: Ask the owner
  • Step 2: Fork, clone, test
  • Step 3: Plan of Action
  • Step 4: Just Do It ™
  • Step 5: Testing

He includes the code he contributed to the project and where each change needed to be made. He also shows how he tested the new feature and the results of calling his new method to count the number of records for a user, group, permission, etc.

tagged: gatekeeper opensource contribute guide casestudy

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/contributing-to-open-source-gatekeeper-case-study/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Appserver – Server Configuration, Dir Structure and Threads
Feb 01, 2016 @ 09:25:05

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series looking at the features of the appserver.io project in this second post covering its server configuration, directory structure and how it handles threads during processing.

In the first part of our Appserver series, we discussed the very high level differences of Appserver’s architecture to standard web server stacks and got you up and running with an Appserver instance.

[...] In this part, we will be exploring the Appserver architecture a bit more in depth. We will go through the concepts of the different contexts and the parts of Appserver you get out of the box, which cover some of the ground most of the popular PHP frameworks offer. We will also configure the web server and look into an application’s structure. Once we are finished, you should have a fair understanding about Appserver’s contexts in relation to threading, the web server, and its setup.

They start with the threading functionality, showing how "contexts" come in to play and how the code executes as long as this context is alive. The post then gets into some of the code-related differences with using appserver such as extra annotation handling and AOP (aspect oriented programming) practices. From there they get into the tech behind the scenes: configuring the web server, setting up a virtual host and pointing it at the sample application. Finally they talk about the servlet engine and the server's directory structure underneath.

tagged: appserverio project opensource server configuration directory structure thread processsing

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/appserver-server-configuration-dir-structure-and-threads/