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Colin O'Dell:
Optimizing colinodell/json5 with Blackfire
Jan 15, 2018 @ 09:50:37

In a post to his site Colin O'Dell shows how he used the Blackfire.io service to optimize the colinodell/json5 package he created to parse JSON5 in PHP. Blackfire.io is a performance profiling service (from the folks behind Symfony) that shows where the pain points are in your code. They also have a "developer" plan that you can use to try out the service.

Back in November, I released colinodell/json5 - a JSON5 parser for PHP. It's essentially a drop-in replacement for PHP's json_decode() function, but it allows things like comments, trailing commas, and more.

Fast forward to this weekend when I received [a] bug report from a user named Antonio [about slowness in parsing large JSON documents]. Yikes! I always knew that a PHP-based implementation would be slower than PHP's native C implementation, but execution time measured in minutes was completely unacceptable!

So I fired up Blackfire (which I've previously used to optimize league/commonmark) and got to work.

He starts off by getting a baseline to work from, executing the parsing on a custom document he created (not quite as large as in the bug report but still large). After locating a few issues he then started in on the optimizations. The first was an issue with the use of mb_substr, the second was around the remainder of the document to parse and the last an optimization for a regular expression. The post ends with a few other micro-optimizations he also made to the package and a check to use json_decode for faster parsing and only kick in the JSON5 parsing when needed.

tagged: optimize json json5 package blackfireio performance

Link: https://www.colinodell.com/blog/201801/optimizing-colinodelljson5-blackfire

Brandon Savage:
What version of PHP should my package support?
Jan 10, 2018 @ 10:09:46

In a post to his site Brandon Savage shares some of his thoughts about PHP package development and suggests how to figure out what versions of the PHP language it should support.

Everybody likes “the new hotness.” [...] Perhaps, then, it shouldn’t be so surprising that people get tremendously excited when a new version of PHP comes out. People look forward to the new features, whether they be the trailing commas in list() syntax or counting of non-countable objects.

[...] A new version of PHP can pose challenges to open source package maintainers. There are questions, like what is the minimum version we will support and how soon can we take advantage of the new features we’ve been waiting on? I want to offer up some thoughts, both as a package maintainer and a user of many open source packages.

He goes on to suggest that package authors should support down to the last currently supported version of the language (v5.6 at the time of this post). This allows users of the package that may be restricted and don't have the "new hotness" to keep using the package. He points out that this doesn't mean that you shouldn't use new features, just that older versions should be supported along with the newer ones for those depending on the package. He makes three suggestions as to how he thinks package maintainers should approach the issue:

  • maintainers should feel comfortable in bumping up the requirement to the latest (in a major release)
  • maintainers should also ensure that the support is still there for older versions that can't use the newer features
  • maintainers should bump up this minimum version when it falls out of active support
Supporting old versions of a language isn’t fun and isn’t glamorous. But it’s important. It’s important because there’a segment of the population who can’t upgrade yet. It’s important to make components accessible to a larger, broader audience who is struggling to find best practices and use modern packages. And it’s important for those users who are tied to a legacy version, and are struggling to get upgraded. But it’s the right thing to do for the community.
tagged: package version language support opinion maintainer old new

Link: https://www.brandonsavage.net/version-php-package-support/

Freek Van der Herten:
Handling CORS in a Laravel application
Jan 08, 2018 @ 09:47:07

On his blog today Freek Van der Herten has a post introducing a new Laravel package designed to help make CORS implementation simpler in your application. CORS headers are, essentially, what allows clients (like browsers) to talk across domains in a configurable and enforceable fashion.

Recently we released laravel-cors. This package can add the necessary CORS headers of your Laravel app. In this post I'd like to give a quick explanation of what CORS is and how you can use the package.

The post starts by explaining a bit about CORS (Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) headers, what they're used for and simple examples of when they might be most useful. It then covers the package, showing how to pull it into your packages and adding it to the middleware configuration for loading on each request. There's also a more detailed configuration you can use to defined allowed and denied domains as well as the idea of "profiles" for different user levels.

tagged: cors laravel crossorigin resource header package introduction tutorial

Link: https://murze.be/handling-cors-in-a-laravel-application

Rob Allen:
Using Composer packages with OpenWhisk
Jan 03, 2018 @ 09:41:55

Rob Allen has a post to his site for the OpenWhisk (a serverless cloud platform) users out there that want to use Composer to install dependencies required by your application.

When creating new OpenWhisk actions in PHP, It's likely that you'll want to take advantage of the rich ecosystem of Composer packages on Packagist.org.

The OpenWhisk PHP runtime has you covered with some pre-installed Composer packages and also the ability to upload your own using a zip file.

He starts by mentioning the two packages that come installed by default: Guzzle and the ramsey/uuid library. He then gets into the upload of your own project files as a ZIP file and how to install the package locally, bundle it up into this archive and push it using the wsk command line tool.

tagged: composer package openwhisk serverless architecture packagist guzzle uuid tutorial

Link: https://akrabat.com/using-composer-packages-with-openwhisk/

Tomas Votruba:
Composer Local Packages for Dummies
Dec 28, 2017 @ 10:17:27

In a post to his site Tomas Votruba provides a guide "for dummies" to using local packages along side your remote packages via Composer.

I wrote about pros and cons of local packages before. After year of using this in practice and mentorings I polished this approach to even simpler version that is easy to start with.

[...] There is no need to use Github, love open-source, understand package design or understand composer beyond PSR-4. No symlink issues, no forgotten composer update. Anyone can start using this!

The "dummy" packages he creates are essentially a simulation of a Composer package just in a different location (under a "packages" directory). This can then be autoloaded via the same Composer configuration you already use without too much trouble.

tagged: package dummy composer autoload tutorial

Link: https://www.tomasvotruba.cz/blog/2017/12/25/composer-local-packages-for-dummies/

Symfony Blog:
Say Thanks to the Libraries you Depend on
Dec 21, 2017 @ 10:49:51

On the Symfony blog there's a post that reminds you, at a time of year when giving is top of mind of a lot of people, to say thank you to the libraries you depend on.

If you're like me, you build apps that depend on a lot of great PHP libraries that are maintained by countless talented developers. That's amazing! The PHP community has come so far! And while I try my best to contribute back, it's tough to show appreciation for all these efforts.

Sometimes, I just want to send some ???? and shout THANKS!

To make it easier, they've released the Thanks composer plugin that will star every package your project depends on automatically to show them your appreciation. It may seem like a little thing to do but project maintainers love to know that their work is appreciated. If you want to show even more appreciation consider emailing the team or individuals working on the project and let them know.

It's easy to get discouraged when working on an Open Source project and hearing back from the users of the library can do wonders for the maintainers and contributors.

tagged: thanks composer package star plugin community

Link: https://symfony.com/blog/say-thanks-to-the-libraries-you-depend-on

Romans Malinovskis:
Pragmatic approach to reinventing ORM
Dec 19, 2017 @ 13:19:57

Romans Malinovskis has a post on his Medium.com site sharing what he calls a "pragmatic approach to reinventing ORM" with his thoughts about a different approach to this commonly used database interface.

It’s been over a year, since I posted my first highly debated post on Reddit: Reinventing the faulty ORM concept. Gathered information helped me design and implement an alternative pattern to ORM with many important advantages and that has reinforced my belief that ORM is faulty.

He's broken the article up into a few sections with details and thoughts for each along the way:

  • Why ORM is important?
  • Why ORM is broken?
  • How Agile Data differ in approach?
  • How Agile Data qualify production/enterprise use?
  • Notes on architectural decisions in Agile Data (OOP vs Decoupling)

That final section focuses mostly on the decoupling aspect and the Agile Data library (a Data Mapper) that can be used and solves some of the common ORM problems he mentioned in the earlier sections.

tagged: orm database interface datamapper agiledata broken opinion package

Link: https://medium.com/@romaninsh/pragmatic-approach-to-reinventing-orm-d9e1bdc336e3

Pineco.de:
Hosting Private Laravel Packages on GitLab
Dec 19, 2017 @ 12:58:27

On the Pine site they've posted a quick tutorial showing how to host private packages on Gitlab, in their case it's for Laravel-related packages but it would work with any project making use of Composer for package management.

When we want to restrict the access to the package we made but we don’t want to pay for a service like Private Packagist, we can use tagged: hosting gitlab private package accesstoken tutorial composer configuration

Link: https://pineco.de/hosting-private-laravel-packages-gitlab/

Robert Basic:
CLI command to whitelist Composer packages
Dec 04, 2017 @ 09:35:37

Robert Basic has shared a quick tip for the Composer users out there (you do use Composer, right?) showing how to exclude certain packages from updates without having to whitelist packages all the time.

Given that Composer has no --exclude flag or similar, the only other option is to create a list of packages we allow to be updated, excluding the ones we don’t want to be updated. We need to create a whitelist.

Creating it manually would be a PITA though, especially if there’s a lot of packages to include or exclude. CLI to the rescue!

He includes a command that grabs the packages from the current composer info listing (using grep, sed, cut and paste). He walks through the command showing how it works to pull the package information out. With the help of the -v option for grep it's easy to remove certain items from the list (blacklist) and to provide a string back to composer that can then be used to update only the remaining packages.

tagged: composer package commandline cli whitelist blacklist

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/cli-command-to-whitelist-composer-packages/

TutsPlus.com:
Package Management in Laravel
Oct 24, 2017 @ 09:34:28

On the TutsPlus.com site there's a new tutorial posted sharing some helpful tips on how to manage packages in a Laravel application making use of Composer's functionality.

In this article, we'll go ahead and explore the package management feature in the Laravel framework. In the course of the article, we’ll go through a real-world example to demonstrate the purpose of the article.

Package management in Laravel is an important feature that allows you to bundle a piece of functionality so that it can be distributed easily. Moreover, you could always publish your package to repositories like Packagist and GitHub that allow other developers to benefit from your package.

They start by listing out the files that will be involved in the tutorial (requiring a pre-set up Laravel application) and a basic knowledge of the application's structure. The article then walks through setting up some of the prerequisites and the creation of your own custom package. They include the updates to the routing, controller, updates to the view and changes in the service provider handling.

tagged: laravel package management tutorial introduction composer

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/package-management-in-laravel--cms-29625