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Evert Pot:
The problem with password_hash()
February 25, 2015 @ 10:51:04

Evert Pot has shared some of his thoughts about why he has a problem with password_hash (and friends). His thoughts are initially about this particular feature but they're actually wider than that.

The initial introduction and rfc for these functions made me uneasy, and I felt like a lone voice against many in that I thought something bad was happening. I felt that they should not be added to the PHP engine. I think that we should not extend the PHP engine, when it's possible to write the same API in userland, or there are significant benefits to do it in PHP, such as performance. Since the heavy lifting of the password functions is done by underlying libraries that are already exposed to userland-PHP, it didn't make sense to me to expose it as well in the core.

He includes a list of things he sees as drawbacks for new C-based functionality in PHP including the fact that it extends the "PHP specification" and forces other projects to implement it (like HHVM). He does include a few positives, though, such as the increased visibility and legitimacy, but still thinks they don't outweigh the negatives.

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password hash core language c implementation opinion userland

Link: http://evertpot.com/password-hash-ew/

The Code of a Ninja:
Salt, Hash and Store Passwords Securely with Phpass
June 16, 2014 @ 11:15:37

In this post to the CodeOfANinjs.com site, they walk you through password hashing, salting and storage using the PHPAss tool from OpenWall. The post itself is a bit older, but the content still provides a good example to teach the basics.

I think the main reason why we have to hash passwords is to prevent passwords from being stolen or compromised. You see, even if someone steal your database, they will never read your actual or cleartext password. I know that some PHP frameworks or CMS already provide this functionality, but I believe that it is important for us to know how its implementation can be made.

The tutorial shows you how to use the library and how to store the result in a simple "users" table in a MySQL database. The examples hash the password given from a simple form and use prepared statements (via PDO) to save it to the database. All PHP, HTML and CSS code you'll need - including the login form that checks the username/password - is included. There's also a few screenshots showing what the resulting forms and data should look like.

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Link: http://www.codeofaninja.com/2013/03/php-hash-password.html

Anna Filina:
Brute-force countermeasures
June 11, 2014 @ 10:09:10

In her latest post Anna Filina has made some recommendations of countermeasures you can use to help prevent abuse against brute force attacks in your applications. The recommendations aren't PHP-specific, but they're a good guide and a place to start.

Password brute-forcing refers to trying all password permutations until the attacker finds the right one. Here are some of the most common ways to mitigate that risk: increase the length of the password and increase the number of possible characters. [...] The human factor should not be ignored here. People often use letters in the beginning and numbers at the end.

She recommends a few other tactics to helping prevent the brute forcing including locking an account after a number of unsuccessful login attempts and requiring a CAPTCHA after a number of unsuccessful logins. She recommends not relying on a single method to help prevent this kind of attack, however. Multiple layers can only help, but be careful not to introduce too much complexity.

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Link: http://afilina.com/brute-force-countermesures

Jordi Boggiano:
Authentication management in Composer
May 28, 2014 @ 11:07:35

Jordi Boggiano has posted about a new feature in Composer, the popular dependency manager for PHP, around the handling of authentication information.

Up until today if you run a home-grown package repository serving private packages it was quite a pain to use with Composer. You did not have efficient way to password-protect the repository except by inlining the password in the composer.json or by typing the username/password every single time. With the merge of PR#1862 and some further improvements you can now remove credentials from your composer.json!

The new functionality allows for the external storage of the credentials in a file, either globally of in one relative to the repository. He also includes the command you can use to configure and set these username/password combinations and have them stored in the "auth.json" file.

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Link: http://seld.be/notes/authentication-management-in-composer

Anthony Ferrara:
Why I Don't Recommend Scrypt
March 13, 2014 @ 10:11:59

Anthony Ferrara has a new post today looking at password hashing and a type of hashing that's beginning to get more attention in the PHP community - scrypt. However, he doesn't recommend it for production password storage and shares his reasoning why.

Scrypt was not designed for password storage. It was designed as a key derivation function for generating keys from weak material (namely passwords). The prime type of attack that scrypt is designed to defeat is ASIC based attackers. It is not designed to try to favor CPU over GPU (and thereby defeat GPU based attacks). It is this fact that we can leverage to gain an advantage when used as a password hashing mechanism.

He covers some of the basic design decisions that were made when scrypt was created. He also points out that none of the results of these decisions are strictly fatal, they just make it a bit weaker than something like bcrypt for password storage. He goes through the basic inputs scrypt requires and includes a quick snippet of code (not PHP, but easy to understand) showing its use. He talks about its "chain of 4 operations" and gets into what he sees as limitations: loop unrolling and the tune-able reduced memory usages. He finishes off the post mentioning that scrypt is still secure, but despite this he doesn't recommend it for password storage specifically.

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scrypt recommend hashing password

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/03/why-i-dont-recommend-scrypt.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Risks and Challenges of Password Hashing
March 11, 2014 @ 09:31:45

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post today about the challenges of password hashing and some of the common risks that can come with it. It's a continuation of a previous article about the actual techniques for hashing in PHP.

The fact that the output of a hash function cannot be reverted back to the input using an efficient algorithm does not mean that it cannot be cracked. Databases containing hashes of common words and short strings are usually within our reach with a simple google search. Also, common strings can be easily and quickly brute-forced or cracked with a dictionary attack.

He points to a video demonstrating a method for getting the password data and why just salted hashes aren't a secure method for storing this information. He mentions a "randomness issue" (and PHP's rand function). Instead, he shows an example with openssl_random_pseudo_bytes o pull a chunk of randomized data. He then talks some about password stretching using the PBKDF2 handling in PHP. Finally, he goes past the hashing and gets into encryption, mentioning "password tweaking" as an alternative to generating a single key for every user.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/risks-challenges-password-hashing/

PHPBuilder.com:
Implementing Secure Passwords in PHP 5.5
January 29, 2014 @ 11:17:40

On PHPBuilder.com today there's a new post introducing you to a relatively recent advancement in PHP (in version 5.5), the password hashing API. In this article they cover the basics including hashing and verifying the result.

PHP has always had a few simple ways to implement password hashing to an extent. MD5 and SHA1 are examples of this, but the security of these methods is not what it should be. [...] What we need is a secure password encryption mechanism that uses SALT and perhaps even something else to help us safely encrypt our passwords for later use. [...] Lucky for us, the folks at PHP have thought about this long and hard, and the result is a very simple PHP password hashing API that is not only easy to use, but fast and secure.

They briefly look at the two major functions in the updated feature - password_hash and password_verify and some basic code examples of their use.

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Link: http://www.phpbuilder.com/articles/application-architecture/security/implementing-secure-passwords-in-php-5.5.html

Hasin Hayder:
Create personalized phar files in PHP
January 15, 2014 @ 09:32:42

Hasin Hayder has a quick post talking about the creation of personalized phar files (packaged up PHP applications) using the Box Project tool.

Created a screencast to show how you can create phar files, most importantly personalized phar files to store some information inside it and protect it using user's password. Those information is usable only when user providers a correct password. For packaging, I have used http://box-project.org which is an excellent phar packager. I've also used two functions from Josh Hartman's blog to encrypt and decrypt data using Rijndael algorithm.

You can watch the full screencast over on YouTube. It walks you through the entire process of creating a simple script, using the two functions (mc_encrypt and mc_decrypt) to handle the encryption and defining the Box configuration JSON to create the package.

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Link: http://hasin.me/2014/01/14/create-personalized-phar-files-in-php

Jeremy Kendall:
PHP Password Hashing A Dead Simple Implementation
January 08, 2014 @ 11:48:23

In this recent post to his site Jeremy Kendall shares some of his thoughts about password hashing and a new library he's written to help make it simpler - event with an existing password hashing method in place.

We all know to encrypt passwords for highest level of security. Unfortunately, too many do it [the wrong way]. While there was never any excuse for getting it that wrong, there's now no excuse for getting it wrong at all. Developers, meet the new(-ish) PHP password hashing functions (and the userland implementation password-compat).

He shows how to use this password hashing correctly with the "default" hash and how to store that in the database. His Password Validator library aims to help make this even simpler and adds in other features like rehashing and upgrading of legacy passwords. The remainder of the post shows how to use the library for these functions and how to persist them in the tool's storage decorator and interface functionality.

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password hashing implementation validator opensource library

Link: http://jeremykendall.net/2014/01/04/php-password-hashing-a-dead-simple-implementation/

BitExpert.de Blog:
Composer, Bower and HTTP Basic Auth
December 27, 2013 @ 11:16:23

Stephan Hochdörfer has shared a handy tip for the Composers users out there that may have to deal with username/password protected repositories as a part of your package install process. In his post he shows how to use a simple "expect" script to automatic the HTTP Basic Auth login.

A couple of months ago when we set-up our own internal Satis repository to host our custom Composer packages. We ran into an "unpleasant" issue with Composer that had this PR as an result. To sum things up: We are using HTTP Basic Auth to password-project our Satis repository. There was no way we could switch to an SSL client certificate to allow Composer to authenticate itself automatically without asking for a password. Asking for the password on a developer`s machine is no big thing, but it since we need an automated Composer run in our Jenkins environment, there was no way to set things up.

As Composer doesn't currently support this functionality, they had to find a way around it. They went with an expect script that is used to work with the prompts and send the username/password information when expected. He also points out that this could be useful for other situations and tools - like a Bower build.

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composer satis username password http basic authorization bower expect

Link: http://blog.bitexpert.de/blog/composer-bower-and-http-basic-auth/


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