News Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint Web Blog:
Code Manifesto Words to Live By
July 28, 2014 @ 12:45:29

The SitePoint Web blog has posted an interesting article sharing something called The Code Manifesto. The "code" referenced here isn't so much related to the actual code developers write as it is the conduct they follow in their relationships with others (on a professional level).

The tech industry has a rather bad reputation. Stories of discrimination, disrespect, sexism and outright mistreatment aren't exactly hard to come by. [...] In an industry ostensibly aimed at helping everyone to reach their potential, it's clear that when it comes to issues of equality and respect, the tech world has a long way to go. Kayla Daniels is one person working to try to change this situation. A North Carolina PHP developer, Kayla is behind The Code Manifesto, a list of values she hopes can be a small step in the right direction.

Among the points made in the manifesto are things like:

  • Discrimination limits us.
  • We are our biggest assets. None of us were born masters of our trade.
  • Respect defines us. Treat others as you wish to be treated.
  • Reactions require grace.

The Manifesto was born out of the frustration felt by Kayla in her work in technology. The six points are designed to help with two main things: respect and equality and contributing to the community...all as equals.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
code manifesto values advice conduct technology

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/code-manifesto/

Matt Frost:
Avoiding Burnout
July 28, 2014 @ 09:59:32

Matt Frost (one of the two hosts on the Loosely Coupled podcast) has a new post to his site about some of his own experiences and advice around avoiding burnout.

Writing software is an incredibly gratifying profession; the idea that you can take a problem and find creative solutions through the use of technology is what drives a lot of us forward. What happens though when the drive is gone? What happens when that nifty little side project, training course, blog post or book goes from being nifty to being a drudgery? I came to this point a number of months ago and stayed there for a while, having now come out of this funk there are some things I learned that I'd like to share.

He talks about some of his own trouble with burnout, the project he was involved in and what it taught him about dealing with it (and life in general). He gives some sensible advice including "don't sit at your desk all day" and "prioritize things". The advice is simple and to the point - avoiding burnout is something only you can do for yourself. Waiting for things to "just get better" isn't going to work.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
burnout experience personal programming advice

Link: http://shortwhitebaldguy.com/blog/2014/07/avoiding-burnout

LinkedIn.com:
Dev Recruiting 101 10 Ways NOT to Interview a Candidate
June 02, 2014 @ 10:21:50

For those out there hiring developers to join their team, you might read up on a few tips in this new article on LinkedIn for the "things not to do" during the interview process.

It has been my observation that most recruiters and hiring managers tend to make the same common mistakes. That is why I've decided to write this new series, "Dev Recruiting 101". In it, you will have the unique opportunity to view your industry from the perspective of a veteran developer. You'll learn the secrets that will win us over and the pitfalls that will make us run for the hills. My goal is to give you the "inside scoop", as it were, about how to attract the best talent in our industry.

The list it broken out into ten different points, each with their own descriptions and real-world examples from the author's experiences:

  • Discourage the candidate by telling them how lousy the job is.
  • Don't show-up for the interview or initiate the call at the agreed-upon time.
  • Don't speak clearly.
  • "Okay, now we'd like you to write some code. Here's some blank printer paper and a #2 pencil."
  • Spend 30 minutes giving a detailed history of the company, then say you've run out of time.
  • "As you know, our site is an adult-oriented webcam service. How often do you watch internet porn?"
  • Make the candidate spend 6 hours interviewing with virtually every single member of the engineering department.
  • Ask niche-specific technical questions that are neither part of the job description nor the candidate's skillset.
  • "If a plane crashes on the border between Russia and Ukraine, where do they bury the survivors?"
  • Judge the candidate based on whether or not they're a telepath.
There is nothing more important in hiring the right candidate than conducting an effective interview. Not only does it help you narrow down your choices, but it's also an opportunity to show the candidate why they want to work for you and not someone else.
0 comments voice your opinion now!
interview developer candidate opinion advice

Link: https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140530075430-11756056-dev-recruiting-101-10-ways-not-to-interview-a-candidate

Rob Allen:
Use statements
March 17, 2014 @ 10:13:08

Rob Allen's latest post focuses in on something that's been a part of PHP for a while now, back when namespacing was introduced - the "use" keyword. He shares some thoughts, both from others and himself, about whether or not they make code more readable.

I was having a discussion on IRC about use statements and whether they improved code readability or not. [...] Those longer class names make it a little hard to quickly parse what it going on. The [example with "use" statements] is clearly less cluttered, but is at the expense of ambiguity. Exactly what class is User? I would have to go to the top of the file to find out. Should I use aliases? If so, how should I name them?

He went out to Twitter for advice from other PHP developers on the issue too. The feedback from his question came mostly in support of the "use" statements:

  • "I think use statements just abstract where the class is coming from. Some people find that useful."
  • "I think it's helpful seeing all of the packages used by a class without having to look through the full code."
  • "One reason I like them is that I can glance at a file and know dependencies immediately."
  • "I do appreciate what you are saying about the indirection use statements introduce."

There's also a bit of talk about "aliasing" with namespaces rather than the full classname, then using the namespace and class name in the code to "minimise ambiguity".

0 comments voice your opinion now!
use statement namespace twitter advice feedback alias

Link: http://akrabat.com/php/use-statements/

Michelangelo van Dam:
There's no PHP user group here!
February 12, 2014 @ 10:27:28

Michelangelo van Dam has a new post to his site today talking about PHP user groups and some suggestions you can follow if you'd like to start one of your own in your local area.

When going to conferences you always hear "join a local user group, and if there's none in your area you're the person who needs to start one". But then what? Where do you get started? How do you organise a PHP user group? Basically, you're left in the dark and you're missing out of all the great stuff everyone else can enjoy.

He makes a few suggestions as far as sites and resources to use to help you promote your group (including Meetup.com and even LinkedIn). He offers some guidelines as far as what to do for your first meeting and a few other people and groups at your disposal to help promote and group your group.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
usergroup introduction advice formation gettingstarted

Link: http://www.dragonbe.com/2014/02/theres-no-php-user-group-here.html

7PHP.com:
A Talk With PHP Recruiter Lonnie Brown - Forget About Money & Take Care Of Your Candidates
February 10, 2014 @ 09:17:59

On the 7PHP.com site today there's a different sort of community interview, this time with Lonnie Brown, a recruiter that's been focusing in on PHP development jobs for the last few years and helping people find that right fit.

You have all heard of recruitment; we have it in all sphere and The PHP Sphere is no exception to that. Have you ever had an talk with a recruiter? [...] Look no further, I bring you The Guy for all these questions and curiosity that you may have! [...] There are some that are making a difference and may be today this interview can show some lights down that tunnel. I would love to hear your comments and feedbacks after your reading + any questions to Lonnie Brown - I'm sure he will happily respond.

In the interview they talk some about Lonnie and his background in recruiting in general and more specific to the PHP community. They focus in on the PHP-related aspects of recruiting and some of the common challenges he deals with. Lonnie shares some of his thoughts for those looking for positions and dealing with recruiters in general.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
recruiter lonniebrown community interview 7php advice

Link: http://7php.com/php-recruiter-lonnie-brown

Matt Frost:
Getting Talks Selected
January 27, 2014 @ 09:04:23

If you're considering getting into the world of speaking at an upcoming PHP conference, Matt Frost has some advice for you to help you get started. It can be intimidating, so learn from some of his own experiences as a relatively new speaker in the community.

It's a very busy conference season in and around the PHP Community. [...] These conferences are such a blessing to those who are able to attend, the speakers know their stuff and are very open to sharing and talking outside of their sessions. But you're a smart cookie too! You've got ideas and thoughts and knowledge that other people would like to have, so how do you get in on this? I'm going to tell you how I got into it, your mileage may vary, but hopefully it helps.

He points out that submitting a talk and getting accepted is "a lot like the lotto" sometimes, that you can't win unless you buy a ticket (submit that talk). He looks at a few of the other common questions from beginning speakers - what do I talk about, how do I write an abstract and common first time speaking concerns.

There's no magical elixir that will land you speaking gigs at cool conferences. Everyone that speaks, from the seasoned pro to the up and comer, has worked extremely hard to not only put the talks together; but acquire all the knowledge necessary to give the talk in the first place
0 comments voice your opinion now!
talk session technical conference advice beginner speaker

Link: http://shortwhitebaldguy.com/blog/2014/01/getting-talks-selected

Stefan Koopmanschap:
How to Get the Most Out of a Conference
November 01, 2013 @ 12:49:51

Stefan Koopmanschap recently posted a great new article about how you can get the most out of conferences and what they have to offer besides just the sessions.

At the most excellent PHPNW conference, Kat convinced me to deliver the first unconference talk of the day. It took me a while to get the right topic. I ended up with a topic I felt everyone at the conference could use for the rest of the two days that they were there: How to get the most out of a conference. For those that were not there, I want to try and put my unconference talk into a blogpost, so that everyone can use this information for their next conference.

He's broken it down into a few different major topics including the obvious "learn from the best" as well as:

  • Learn and meet the best
  • Find your new colleagues (or new friends)
  • The backchannels
  • Hack away! (at hackathons)

He also makes a great recommendation about providing feedback - not only is it important to the conference to let them know they've done a good job, but also to the speakers to help improve their skills.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
conference advice learn colleagues friends social feedback hackathon involvement

Link: http://leftontheweb.com/blog/2013/10/25/How_to_get_the_most_out_of_a_conference/

The Nerdery:
Why Most Stories About WordPress Security Are Wrong
September 12, 2013 @ 09:18:55

On The Nerdery's blog today there's a new post suggesting that most of the reports of WordPress' insecurity are wrong and they're going to set the record straight.

I have often heard the remark "WordPress is insecure!" My response is "Where did you hear that?" and "When did you hear that?" [...] WordPress core is, in fact, very secure, just as secure as any other Content Management System, just as secure as any other software suite or Operating System. Security issues most often arise from administrators and users. In other words, you are the weakest link.

They suggest that between the high-profile nature of WordPress and the constant (sometimes wrongful) warning being put out there about its security, people perpetuate the message sometimes unknowingly. Besides the human element being the largest risk, they also point out a few others including issues around shared hosting and the availability of easy-to-find tools to exploit flaws. They talk about a brief history of the WP core security and how they define the real security of a product - how quickly it responds to security issues. They also include a few suggestions for you to help harden your own WP installation.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
wordpress security risk history wrong story advice

Link: http://blog.nerdery.com/2013/09/why-wordpress-security-stories-are-wrong/

Erika Heidi Reinaldo:
Advices and resources for PHP novices
September 11, 2013 @ 09:59:01

Erika Heidi Reinaldo has made a post over on her Coderwall page with a few helpful hints for the budding PHP developers out there about things to investigate and learn to help further their knowledge of the language.

This post is a collection of things that I consider important for people who are starting with PHP, based on my experiences with this language through the years. PHP has considerable evolved in the last years, thanks mainly to the community efforts. [...] As a downside for the language evolution, as things change, tutorials and practices might get deprecated. So we have a lack of good updated tutorials for beginners.

She includes some great things for new developers to look into including a recommendation to "learn the language, not a framework" and exploring git and Github as a collaborative workspace to both share your own work and explore the work of others for helpful hints. She also makes a recommendation that can help more than most developer think - get involved (contribute to projects or meet with other developers, online or at something like a user group).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
advice resource beginner developer language recommendation

Link: https://coderwall.com/p/0ictea


Community Events





Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


experience testing podcast developer list unittest language opinion laravel series framework code release community introduction configure threedevsandamaybe interview install wordpress

All content copyright, 2014 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework