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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Breaking Free from Guzzle5 with PHP-HTTP and HTTPlug
Nov 09, 2015 @ 09:35:41

In a new tutorial from the SitePoint PHP blog editor Bruno Skvorc shows you how to "break free" from using the Guzzle HTTP client (which has become, by far, the most popular) and make it simpler to go with another option. He highlights the HTTPlug library that makes it easy to do just that.

In a previous series, we built a PHP client for Diffbot. The client works well and is in relatively widespread use – we even tested it on a live app to make sure it’s up to par – but it depends heavily on Guzzle 5.

There are two problems with this: Guzzle 6 is out, and supports PSR 7. [...] Someone implementing our client in their app might already have a preferred HTTP client in use, and would like to use theirs rather than Guzzle. [...] Coincidentally, there is a new project allowing us to do just that: HTTPlug.

He walks you through the installation of the library via Composer and covers what all kinds of functionality it contains. HTTPlug provides an "entry point" and unified interface for the HTTP client of your choosing, complete with interface packages to wrap the most common functionality. He shows how to refactor his Diffbot code to use the package, replacing the previous Guzzle dependency using the virtual package definition HTTPlug provides. He also updates some of the tests to use the HTTPlug package types rather than relying on Guzzle's object return types.

tagged: guzzle http client httplug library abstract tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/breaking-free-from-guzzle5-with-php-http-and-httplug/

Cees-Jan Kiewiet:
ReactPHP: HTTP Client
Nov 05, 2015 @ 12:05:14

Cees-Jan Kiewiet has a post on his site focusing on the HTTP client side of the functionality offered by the ReactPHP. In this post he covers the basics of installation and usage with plenty of code examples (and screencasts of it in action).

Aside from a HTTP component ReactPHP also has a HTTP Client component that lets your send out HTTP requests. It is incredibly handy when you need to communicate with for example elasticsearch's REST API, AWS platform through their SDK or the RIPE Atlas API.

He walks you through the simple installation of the library (via Composer) and the code to send a simple request to an example.com domain, returning the HTML contents of the page. He then gets to some more complex examples: sending two requests at the same time, streaming the response body as it arrives and an example based on community feedback - streaming Twitter data. He ends the post with a community example showing the use of the Buzz HTTP client to make simple requests.

tagged: reactphp http client example stream twitter screencast

Link: http://blog.wyrihaximus.net/2015/11/reactphp-http-client/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Build a Superfast PHP Server in Minutes with Icicle
Sep 17, 2015 @ 11:21:44

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial by Christopher Pitt showing you how to build a PHP server "super fast" with the help of the Icicle/http library and some event-driven programming techniques.

Event-based programming is a strange topic for PHP developers. In a language as procedural; events are little more than function calls. Nothing happens between events, and all meaningful code is still blocking.

Languages like JavaScript show us what PHP could be like if event loops were at the center. Some folks have taken these insights and coded them into event loops and HTTP servers. Today we’re going to create an HTTP server, in PHP. We’ll connect it to Apache to serve static files quickly. Everything else will pass through our PHP HTTP server, based on Icicle.

They start off showing you how to configure your Apache server to rewrite the requests (only for non-existent files) to the PHP handler. From there, he helps you get the Icicle/http library installed and create a simple HTTP server with it's included functionality. He shows how to set up routing using the LeagueRoute package and return correct HTTP response codes based on the result of the request. Finally he shows the use of the LeaguePlates library to render more complex views than just plain-text results.

tagged: tutorial http server icicle league plates route

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/build-a-superfast-php-server-in-minutes-with-icicle/

Davey Shafik:
Aug 24, 2015 @ 10:54:54

Davey Shafik has published a post about library he's created that's a sort of "recorder" for connections made with the Guzzle HTTP client - the Guzzle VCR.

A few days ago I pushed out a very small library to help with testing APIs using Guzzle: dshafik/guzzlehttp-vcr. [...] This is a simple middleware that records a request’s response the first time it’s made in a test, and then replays it in response to requests in subsequent runs.

The handler works by recording the responses from the API (ex: the JSON response data) and records them to files (again, JSON). A one-line call turns the "recording" on and points to a directory where the cached files should be stored. He shows how to use it in the constructor of your Guzzle client, setting it up as the "handler" for the requests. He also includes an example of a few unit tests that make use of the recording feature to check the response of a /test endpoint.

tagged: guzzle http client vcr recording response json cache handler

Link: http://daveyshafik.com/archives/69384-guzzlehttp-vcr.html

Phil Sturgeon:
Avoid Hardcoding HTTP Status Codes
Aug 17, 2015 @ 12:55:53

Phil Sturgeon has a post to his site with a good recommendation for those working with APIs and those "magic numbers" that are HTTP status codes - avoid hard coding them in your applications and tests.

A lot of things in programming are argued to death, but one subject where people almost unanimously agree is that magic numbers can be a pain in the ass, and they should be avoided whenever possible. Sadly when it comes to HTTP status codes, people keep on hardcoding them, and it leads to all sorts of confusion. [...] What is 409? If you answer without looking it up on Dash or HTTP Status Dogs then you are a machine.

He shows two implementations of this idea, one in Ruby and the other in Symfony, where the status code value is represented by a constant rather than by a number. The constant correlates to the HTTP status code (number) but the constant makes it easier to read and understand the code. He points out two libraries that can be substituted into your current testing to replace those hard coded values with more expressive versions: lukasoppermann/http-status and Teapot.

tagged: avoid hardcode http status code opinion expressive teapot httpstatus

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/http/2015/08/16/avoid-hardcoding-http-status-codes/

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
On PSR7 and HTTP Headers
Jul 29, 2015 @ 09:47:59

Matthew Weier O'Phinney has a new post to his site talking about PSR-7 and HTTP headers and how they (headers) are handled in the structure of this PHP-FIG specification.

Yesterday, a question tagged #psr7 on Twitter caught my eye: "When I call $request->getHeader('Accept') for example, I was expected that I'll get [an array] but, in reality I got [a string]. Is this correct?" In this post, I'll explain why the behavior observed is correct, as well as shed a light on a few details of header handling in PSR-7.

He talks about the planning that went into PSR-7 and how they had to work around some of the "flexibility" (quirks) in the HTTP specification. This was especially true when it came to repeated headers. He also walks through their thoughts on multiple header handling and that custom header values are allowed. Because of these two things, they decided to treat all headers as collections and, despite there being separators already in the values. Instead they collected headers of the same types into these collections, some containing only one value while others could contain multiple. Back to the question - this explains why the "Accept" header they desired was still in its comma-separated form and not split into the array they expected.

The [...] example provides another good lesson: Complex values should have dedicated parsers. PSR-7 literally only deals with the low-level details of an HTTP message, and provides no interpretation of it. Some header values, such as the Accept header, require dedicated parsers to make sense of the value.
tagged: psr7 http header collection separator multiple single

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2015-07-28-on-psr7-headers.html

Mattias Noback:
Refactoring the Cat API client (3 Part Series)
Jul 16, 2015 @ 11:25:54

Mattias Noback has posted a three part series of tutorial articles around the refactoring of a "CatApi" class. These articles take the class from a jumbled mess of functionality with both direct file access and remote requests mixed in into something much more maintainable and flexible.

t turned out, creating a video tutorial isn't working well for me. I really like writing, and speaking in public, but I'm not very happy about recording videos. I almost never watch videos myself as well, so... the video tutorial I was talking about won't be there. Sorry! To make it up with you, what follows is a series of blog posts, covering the same material as I intended to cover in the first episodes of the tutorial.

In part one he introduces the current state of the "CapApi" class and some of the problems with it, both in testing and in structure. He does some basic refactoring to split out some of the logic here and moves on to part two. In the second part of the series he focuses on refactoring the HTTP request and the local file system functionality into abstract, injectable objects. Finally in part three he adds in some verification around the data being passed back and forth between objects including both simple checking and the use of value objects.

tagged: refactor api class series part1 part2 part3 filesystem http request xml validation

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2015/07/refactoring-the-cat-api-client-part-1/

PHP Roundtable:
022: All About PSR-7
Jun 12, 2015 @ 10:21:00

The PHP RoundTable podcast has posted their latest episode - Episode #22: All About PSR-7 (the recently accepted PHP-FIG standard for an HTTP interface layer).

PSR-7 is the latest accepted member to the PHP FIG's standards library. We discuss what PSR-7 is, how it utilizes streams, immutability & middleware, and how it will affects you as a developer.

You can catch this latest episode either through the embedded video player or directly on YouTube. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed or follow them on Twitter.

tagged: phproundtable ep22 psr7 http larrygarfield matthewweierophinney beausimensen

Link: https://www.phproundtable.com/episode/psr-7-streams-immutability-middleware-oh-my

Symfony Blog:
PSR-7 Support in Symfony is Here
Jun 01, 2015 @ 12:19:15

The Symfony project has officially announced PSR-7 support in the latest version of the framework. PSR-7 is a recently approved standard by the PHP-FIG to make a more structured HTTP request and response structure (to aid in interoperability).

Less than 2 weeks ago, the PHP community roundly accepted PSR-7, giving PHP a common set of HTTP Message Interfaces. This has huge potential for interoperability and standardization across all of PHP. This is especially true for middleware: functions that hook into the request-response process. In the future, a middleware written around these new interfaces could be used in any framework. [...] Today, a huge number of projects use Symfony's Request and Response classes (via the HttpFoundation component), including Laravel, Drupal 8 and StackPHP.

[...] For that reason, we're thrilled to announce the 0.1 release of the PSR HTTP Message Bridge: a library that can convert Symfony Request and Response objects to PSR-7 compatible objects and back. This means that once there are middleware written for PSR-7, applications using HttpFoundation will be compatible.

The bridge makes it simpler to swap out the HTTP layer by converting the HTTP objects into something other frameworks can use (or so others can be used by Symfony). They provide some examples of how to put it to use, converting objects both to and from the standard Symfony HttpFoundation versions. There's also a quick note about the RequestInterface and ResponseInterface structure that allows you to bridge your own gaps between the PSR-7 friendly components and Symfony.

tagged: psr7 support httpfoundation request response http bridge phpfig

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/psr-7-support-in-symfony-is-here

Frank de Jonge:
Rendering ReactJS templates server-side
May 21, 2015 @ 09:17:50

Frank de Jonge has posted a tutorial to his site showing how you can render React.js templates server-side in PHP. He makes use of the V8JS extension to execute Javascript inside of PHP and echo out the rendered result.

The last couple of months I've been working with ReactJS quite extensively. It's been a very rewarding and insightful journey. There is, however, one part that kept coming back to me: server-side rendering. How on earth am I going to use ReactJS when I want to render my templates on the server? So, I sat down and looked at the possibilities.

He suggests two options, running a small Node application or using the V8JS extension, and opts for trying the second option to meet his needs. He talks about the "why" of rendering server-side JS and gives a brief introduction to V8JS and the workflow he'll follow to use it. He helps you get this library via Composer to make working with it easier and provides an example of how to use it. After trying out this method, he then goes back to option #1, the small Node application (what he ended up choosing). He walks through the setup of this application, showing how to set it up inside a Lumen application and using Express to output the generated templates and data. He then hooks this into the PHP application via a simple HTTP client grabbing the results and pushing them back out to the page.

tagged: reactjs template serverside nodejs v8js extension http lumen

Link: http://blog.frankdejonge.nl/rendering-reactjs-templates-server-side/