News Feed
Jobs Feed
Sections




News Archive
feed this:

Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Federico Cargnelutti:
TDD Checking the return value of a Stub
April 16, 2014 @ 10:25:15

Federico Cargnelutti has a helpful post to his site today for the unit testing/TDD crowd about checking the retuned value from a stub of an object in your tests. He's using the built-in mocking framework here, not something like Mockery.

State verification is used to ensure that after a method is run, the returned value of the SUT is as expected. Of course, you may need to use Stubs on a test double or a real object to tell the object to return a value in response to a given message. [...] In PHP, for example, you dynamically type the return value within the body of the method. This means that PHP mocking libraries cannot check the type of the return value and provide guarantees about what is being verified. This leads to the awkward situation where a refactoring may change the SUT behaviour and leave a stub broken but with passing tests.

He gives an example of a few classes - a Presenter and Collaborator - and a test that mocks out the Collaborator instance, calling a "getStories" method on it. He shows a situation where all tests pass in the initial version, but after some changes to the return type, a test that should fail doesn't. His solution for the issue revolves around DocBlock annotations and the Return Value instead of the built-in mock object return method.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
tdd unittest return value stub passing test returnvalue mock

Link: http://blog.fedecarg.com/2014/04/15/checking-the-return-value-of-a-stub/

Phil Bennett:
Dependency Injection as a Tool for Testing
August 16, 2013 @ 10:29:42

Phil Bennett has a new post today talking about a way that you could use dependency injection in your testing, making it easier to work your system by using stubs, fakes and mocks.

Dependency injection is a simple design pattern that provides several benefits, one of which is the ability to vastly improve your unit test suite. In this post I am going to be looking at how this is done and how it relates to certain testing methodologies.

He talks some about the refactoring of an application to allow for easier dependency injection and how, while easier, can still make it difficult to abstract out things like database functionality. Instead, he suggests creating "fake" classes that model the behavior of the needed dependency. He shows examples of each type - a fake, stub and mock - and talks some about the differences between each (and situations one might be used over the other).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
dependency injection unittest stub mock fake

Link: http://happyaccidents.me/dependency-injection-as-a-tool-for-testing

Codeception.com:
Nothing is Untestable AspectMock in Action
August 01, 2013 @ 11:26:12

On the Codeception site they've posted a guide to using the AspectMock feature of the testing tool to prove that "nothing is untestable."

We already announced AspectMock, the mocking framework that may dramatically change the way you do testing in PHP. In this video Jeffrey Way shows how AspectMock is different from others. In this post we will demonstrate its powers too, and we will try to break some stereotypes about PHP testing. To get the code tested, you should always keep in mind how you would write a test for it. We know unit testing requires some good practices to follow and bad practices to avoid.

Their first example involves testing singletons, notorious for being difficult to test because of their "global" state. He also gives a more practical example using a Yii2-based application and a login form. True to its name, the AspectMock uses Aspect Oriented Programming concepts to make the "magic" happen behind the scenes.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
codeception aspect mock aspectoriented unittest singleton

Link: http://codeception.com/07-31-2013/nothing-is-untestable-aspect-mock.html

Inviqa techPortal:
PHP Test Doubles Patterns with Prophecy
July 23, 2013 @ 12:31:08

The Inviqa techPortal has a new post today from Marcello Duarte about using Prophecy in unit testing to work with mocks and doubles.

Test doubles are a way of replacing all classes in our tests other than the one we are testing. They give us control on direct and indirect outputs that would have been generated by those classes. Understanding the role of the test double helps us to write better tests, and thus better code. [...] When writing unit tests we are focusing on describing one unit of behaviour at a time, and how objects communicate in order to achieve that behaviour. We instantiate the object under test, call a method of the object and observe if the outcome is as expected.

In his examples he uses Prophecy to mock out different kinds of objects - a dummy object, a "fake" (with listeners for other object calls), a stub that mocks other internal method calls and a more familiar mock object. He also talks about two guidelines to follow when thinking about writing tests and code complexity - the Law of Demeter and "Don't Mock What You Don't Own." He gives an example of working around this last one by using the Adapter design pattern.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
prophecy unittest designpattern doubles mock stub dummy fake

Link: http://techportal.inviqa.com/2013/07/23/php-test-doubles-patterns-with-prophecy

James Morris:
PHPUnit Mocking and Method Chaining
July 17, 2013 @ 12:13:02

James Morris has an interesting new post about mocking and method chaining and a discovery he made about the proper use of the "at" method in what his mock objects were expecting.

I've been given the task of unit testing Symfony2's security layer, which at first seems daunting, but in reality with a clever bit of PHPUnit mocking, it's actually quite simple. Symfony2 makes heavy use of method chaining.

He illustrates one way to create the mocks for this chain (one mock returning another) but suggests an alternative - returning an instance of "self" to keep the chain alive. He also includes a bit about the "at" matcher and how, despite what the PHPUnit documentation says, it should be correctly used to handle the response of certain methods in the chained call.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
phpunit mock method chain object tutorial matcher

Link: http://blog.jmoz.co.uk/phpunit-mocking-and-method-chaining

NetTuts.com:
How to Write Testable and Maintainable Code in PHP
May 16, 2013 @ 11:53:18

NetTuts.com has a new tutorial posted suggesting a few ways you can make testable and maintainable code in PHP applications.

Frameworks provide a tool for rapid application development, but often accrue technical debt as rapidly as they allow you to create functionality. Technical debt is created when maintainability isn't a purposeful focus of the developer. Future changes and debugging become costly, due to a lack of unit testing and structure. Here's how to begin structuring your code to achieve testability and maintainability - and save you time.

There's a few concepts they cover in the tutorial including DRY (don't repeat yourself), working with dependency injection and actually writing the tests with PHPUnit. They start with a bit of code that needs some work and use the tests to help refactor it into something that can be easily mocked (using Mockery).

0 comments voice your opinion now!
testable maintainable code tutorial bestpractice mock object

Link: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/how-to-write-testable-and-maintainable-code-in-php

DZone.com:
PHPUnit vs. Phake cheatsheet
April 19, 2013 @ 09:53:45

On DZone.com today Giorgio Sironi has posted a "cheat sheet" to help you correlate the functionality of two PHP unit testing tools - PHPUnit vs Phake (for mocking objects).

Benjamin Eberlei introduced me to Phake with his recent article: it is a Composer-ready PHP library that integrates easily with PHPUnit and provides an independent Test Doubles framework, capable of producing Stubs, Mocks, and Spies. The syntax and object model reminds me of Mockito, the Java Test Double framework from the authors of Growing Object-Oriented Software. I like tools that do one thing and do it well, and after experimenting with Phake I'm using it on all new code.

He compares the two tools on a few different pieces of functionality including creating stubs, mocks and spies. Sample code is included for both sides. It's not a detailed guide by any means, but it can give you a better picture of how the two compare.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
phpunit phake mock stub unittest spies compare cheetsheet

Link: http://css.dzone.com/articles/phpunit-vs-phake-cheatsheet

Juan Treminio:
Unit Testing Tutorial Part V Mock Methods and Overriding Constructors
April 05, 2013 @ 09:38:49

Juan Treminio has posted the latest part of his unit testing series to his site today - the fifth part that looks at using mock methods on mock objects and overriding constructors.

Previously in my PHPUnit tutorial series, you learned about the very powerful concept of mock objects and stub methods. This concept is central to successful unit testing, and once it fully 'clicks' in your head you will start to realize how useful and simple testing can be. There is also another thing I want to make clear: creating tests is basically a puzzle - you simply have to go step by step, making sure all the pieces fit together correctly so you can get your green. I hope to make clear what I mean by the end of this tutorial.

He assumes you already know about mock objects and introduces the concept of "stub methods" and "mock methods", noting the difference between them. He then gets into what he calls the "four pathways of getMockBuilder" and talks about the rationale behind mocking methods in the first place. He then gets into constructors and how you can work around the "bad" ones with help from mock object functionality.

If you're interested in reading the rest of the series, you can find links to them here.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
phpunit tutorial mock method object constructor

Link: http://jtreminio.com/2013/03/unit-testing-tutorial-part-5-mock-methods-and-overriding-constructors/

Michelangelo van Dam:
Look mama, no databases
March 18, 2013 @ 10:11:46

In his most recent post Michelangelo van Dam talks about unit testing and databases and how, to effectively test what should be tested (the code, not "the ability to fetch data") you need to correctly mock your database objects.

When I state "as is", I truly mean the way it's being used in production. So the database call collects real data on which business logic is applied. You can see this is not a healthy situation, especially when you also have services that apply business logic on data and store it back into the database. In "Chris Hartjes wrote this one sentence that says it all: "Unit test suites are meant to be testing code, not the ability of a database server to return results". And he's right, you shouldn't use database connections when your testing business rules and functional logic.

He goes on to show a few code examples that show a pre-mocked state of testing where the Product information is pulled directly from a PDO connection. The more correct version mocks out this object, though, and overrides the "execute" and "fetchAll" methods to return mocked results.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
phpunit unittest database mock object pdo database


Matt Frost:
Mocking SoapClient
December 21, 2012 @ 10:23:02

Matt Frost has shared some of his work he's done with the SoapClient in PHP and how he mocked it out for his unit tests (since it's an external resource).

The concept of mocking web services for testability took a little while to sink in for me. A big part of it was that my job doesn't see me consuming web services all that often, but I had an opportunity to give it a shot with SOAP. I found that I learned a lot more about testing in general having worked through this. I used SoapClient and wrapped it, so here's a little bit about some of things I learned. Hopefully you don't have to work with SOAP, but if you do you can test it pretty easily.

He walks through the mocking of the client itself and how he handled it's ability to translate function calls into SOAP method calls (using "__call") and how he mocked that. He also makes the suggestion that you actually wrap the SoapClient inside of another class rather than trying to mock the actual SoapClient. He also touches on the testing of exceptions that might be thrown by the service and how he tested those using his wrapper class.

0 comments voice your opinion now!
mock unittest soapclient wrapper exception function



Community Events











Don't see your event here?
Let us know!


database project threedevsandamaybe component podcast language hack release introduction package install framework hhvm security unittest composer application facebook symfony2 performance

All content copyright, 2014 PHPDeveloper.org :: info@phpdeveloper.org - Powered by the Solar PHP Framework