Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 3)
Sep 19, 2017 @ 11:58:39

Mark Baker has posted the third part of his series looking at an alternative way to handle mocking in the tests for your PHP application. In this latest part of the series he shows how to modify one of PHPUnit's own mocking examples to use an anonymous class.

I have heard people say that you shouldn’t test abstract classes or traits, only the concrete classes that implement or use them. I don’t follow that approach: unit testing is all about testing in isolation from anything that might affect those tests. Testing a concrete class that implements an abstract one, or uses a trait, means that the abstract class or trait is no longer fully isolated, but is being tested within the scope of the whole of that concrete class. We should still always test concrete classes as well; but we should also test the abstract classes and traits as individual units.

So just how do we test something that cannot be instantiated on its own?

He shares one tactic that some developers use - a class designed only for testing - but suggests that this "pollutes" the codebase. Instead he shows how to replace mocking for traits and abstract classes with an anonymous class that's more "disposable". He also shows how to modify this approach to handle calling protected methods in the class the anonymous class extends.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part3 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/09/18/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-3/

Martin Hujer:
Don't Use Entities in Symfony Forms. Use Custom Data Objects Instead
Aug 28, 2017 @ 10:53:14

In this post to his site Martin Hujer suggests that you don't use entities directly in your Symfony forms, opting instead for custom functionality to persist form data.

Let's start with stating that using entities for validation in Symfony Forms is widely used and widely recommend approach. Even the official documentation suggests it.

And I don't think it is a good idea! Why? [Three reasons:] an entity should be always valid, change [in the future and] layers separation.

For each of these downfalls he gets into a bit of detail about what the issue is and introduces the alternative: a custom data class. This class is then used to represent the data in the form with some simple assertions. He includes an example of this kind of class with three properties: title, content and public date. He then shows how to build a form using this class and how to handle updates, not just creates, with the same functionality.

tagged: tutorial entity symfony form data persistence custom class

Link: https://blog.martinhujer.cz/symfony-forms-with-request-objects/

Pawel Mikolajczuk:
Custom Caching for Twig
Aug 16, 2017 @ 11:07:07

In this post to his Medium blog Pawel Mikolajczuk shares some helpful tips for getting the most performance out of your Twig output with some custom caching techniques.

In Superdesk Publisher we have implemented Mutlitenancy with possibility to have multiple themes (but one activated). To make process of switching, uploading and updating themes for tenant we had to came up with solution to clear cache only for one particular theme not the whole instance (with many organisations and tenants).

To achieve that we created custom Twig Cache class.

He then shares the code for the class, extending the base Twig filesystem caching, to work with the multi-tenant architecture. It ensures that the output from one account is completely separate from another, preventing concerns of the wrong data being shown to the wrong user. He also shows how to enable it in the application configuration (Symfony) and a custom "compiler pass" class to finish the integration.

tagged: twig custom cache class output multitenant architecture

Link: https://medium.com/@pawel.mikolajczuk/custom-caching-for-twig-f9a7303cebdd

Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 2)
Aug 11, 2017 @ 10:44:19

Mark Baker has posted the second part of his series covering the use of closures and anonymous classes as an alternative approach to mocking in your unit tests. In part one he introduced some of the basic concepts behind their use and in this latest post he focuses on "different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties".

The last time I posted here, I was writing about Anonymous Functions and how they can be bound to any object (or class) to execute as though they are a method within the scope of that class (Closure Binding as an alternative to “use” variables); and in the first article in this series, I looked at using a Closure to access private and protected properties of an object.

I was going to write this particular article about using simple Anonymous Classes to create test doubles for Unit Testing – and may well return to that topic in a future article in the series – but Matt Brunt has written a good post on that topic already, so instead I’m going to focus on a different approach to using an Anonymous Class to verify the values of object properties that we otherwise couldn’t see directly when testing a class.

He goes on to talk about some ideas from the Java ecosystem around nested classes and scoping. He then shows how, with closure binding, the same kind of effect can be created in PHP testing. He includes the code for an example of a class that coverts distance measurements. He then introduces his "SpyMaster" utility class that "infiltrates" the class under test and attaches the closure providing the needed point for testing. He finishes up the post talking about this functionality and how the technique can be used in many places, not just testing class constructors.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part2 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/07/30/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-2/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Booking Cookery Classes with Acuity Scheduling and Lumen
May 16, 2017 @ 10:44:09

The SitePoint PHP blog has recently posted a tutorial from author Lukas White showing how to create an online reservation system for cooking classes using Lumen and the Acuity Scheduling service.

I recently wrote an article about building an online system to book lessons with a driving instructor. [...] Cookery classes usually have a very well-defined limit on the number of students — you can only really teach as many people as you have cooking stations or cookers. That’s going to be the theme of this article — managing those “slots” in a cookery class. The principles remain the same for all sorts of other forms of tuition.

As before, we’re going to take advantage of Acuity Scheduling in order to manage bookings for our classes, and everything that entails.

First he walks you through exactly what he'll guide you through building and a real world scenario where it might be used. Next he shows how to set up an account on Acuity, create appointment types and get the credentials for the API integration. From there he gets into the implementation:

  • Creating a new Lumen project
  • installing the PHP SDK from Acuity
  • Getting a list of available class times and showing the list in a view
  • Setting up the booking form and handling the submit

This last step includes reaching out to the Acuity API and submitting the information for the appointment. It's not tracked on the application's side opting to use the Acuity service as a source of record.

tagged: tutorial cookery class online scheduling acuity api

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/booking-cookery-classes-with-acuity-scheduling-and-lumen/

Exakat Blog:
Moving from array to class
Apr 12, 2017 @ 11:18:42

In a new post to the Exakat blog there's a proposal to replace uses of arrays with classes to make scripts more efficient and handle resources better behind the scenes.

Ever since I started using PHP, arrays have always been my friend. They are versatile, they have a wide range of functions, and they are easy to use. I kept using them versions after versions, and even with PHP 7.2, I still rely on them a lot. Over the years, classes have also made their way into my toolset. They have a different usage : classes are for complex data structures, for business logic. Simple data structures get an array. Until we tried what seemed impossible : a moving from an array to a class.

He mentions some of the recent changes in PHP 7 that make the use of classes over arrays a bit more advantageous. He then gets into how to take advantage of these efficiency benefits in moving from arrays to classes. He uses an example from his own work in the Exacat engine, how he performed the replacement and a small caveat he found when working with functions requiring array input. He ends the post with some of the other benefits from making the move including performance enhancements, readability and reduced memory usage.

tagged: array class performance difference tutorial php7

Link: https://www.exakat.io/moving-from-array-to-class/

Adam Wathan:
Detecting Out of Sync Mocks in Mockery
Apr 05, 2017 @ 11:14:41

Adam Wathan has shared a new post on his site with advice on finding out-of-date mocks when using the Mockery mocking tool in your testing.

If you're not careful, it's easy to find yourself in a situation where a test double has gotten out of sync with the actual class or interface it's mocking.

In this quick screencast (taken from my Test-Driven Laravel course), I walk through how I use a little-known Mockery feature to help track down these issues and make sure I'm not mocking methods that don't exist.

The quick screencast (about 4 minutes) gives an example of locating the issue when a "Ticket" class is refactored. While the tests still pass, it can cause issues in testing and can be difficult to find. Mockery comes with a configuration option (in 1.0 alpha) to disable the mocking of methods that don't exist on the original object. He shows how to disable this feature and what the resulting error looks like when the tests are run.

tagged: mockery screencast unittest mock sync class disable configuration

Link: https://adamwathan.me/2017/04/03/detecting-out-of-sync-mocks-in-mockery/

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Using Anonymous Classes to Write Middleware
Apr 03, 2017 @ 11:22:48

Matthew Weier O'Phinney, lead developer on the Zend Framework project, has written up a new post for his site showing how to use anonymous classes to write middleware for your applications (several frameworks support the concept of middleware these days).

I faced an interesting question recently with regards to middleware: What happens when we go from a convention-based to a contract-based approach when programming?

Convention-based approaches usually allow for duck-typing; with middleware, it means you can write PHP callables - usually closures - and just expect them to work.

Contract-based approaches use interfaces. I think you can see where this is going.

He starts off looking at some of the currently popular methods for creating middleware basic them off of either the PSR-7 standard or the proposed PSR-15 HTTP middleware, each with code examples to illustrate. The post then gets to the point with a look at anonymous class-based middleware and some of the advantages they provide. He refactors both a PSR-7 middleware and a closure-based middleware over to PSR-15 using this method.

tagged: middleware anonymous class psr7 psr15 closure tutorial

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2017-03-30-anonymous-class-middleware.html

Sameer Borate:
New features in PHP 7.1
Feb 13, 2017 @ 10:57:45

The PHP 7.1.x releases are some of the latest versions of the language. There's plenty of new features that came along with this new release. In this new post to his CodeDiesel blog Sameer Borate looks at some of these new features (including code snippets to illustrate).

The PHP development team announced PHP 7.1.0 on 01 Dec 2016. This release is the first point release in the 7.x series. There are a few features – like the void return type – which have been introduced. Below are a few new selected features in PHP 7.1.

In the post he covers:

  • void functions (return type)
  • nullable types
  • symmetric array destructuring
  • class constant visibility

For each, code samples are provided and some of the benefits (and limitations) that come along with them.

tagged: feature php71 void nullable array class constant summary

Link: http://www.codediesel.com/php/new-features-in-php-7-1/

DeliciousBrains.com:
Hooks, Line, and Sinker: WordPress’ New WP_Hook Class
Jan 25, 2017 @ 10:34:02

The Delicious Brains site has a new post looking at an addition to the WordPress platform allowing you to hook into the core - the WP_Hook class. In the latest release of WordPress this system received a major overhaul and in this article they share what's been updated and what kind of impact it should have on your code.

The hooks system is a central pillar of WordPress and with the 4.7 release a major overhaul of how it works was merged. The Trac ticket that initially raised an issue with the hooks system was logged over 6 years ago. After a few attempts, the updates finally made it into the 4.7 release and the venerable hooks system was overhauled. In this post I want to go over some of the technical changes and decisions that went into the new WP_Hook class. I’ll also go over some of the more interesting aspects of WordPress core development and look into what it takes to overhaul a major feature in WordPress core.

The post starts out with what's changed related to the hooks handling, mostly that the functionality has moved out into a new "WP_Hook" class. This migrates it way from being handled right next to the plugin logic. He details some of the behind the scenes changes to the code and changes made to help improve performance. The post finishes out looking at the backwards compatibility of these changes and what it means for developers upgrading to this new WordPress version (hint: not much).

tagged: tutorial wordpress hooks upgrade class improvement performance

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/hooks-line-sinker-wordpress-wp-hook-class/