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Paul Jones:
MVC and ADR are User-Interface Patterns, Not Application Architectures
January 26, 2015 @ 11:51:26

In response to a recent post from Anthony Ferrara about MVC Paul Jones suggests that Anthony's view that it and related structures "all pretend to be application architectures" is false.

The central mistake I think Anthony makes is near the end of this post, where he states (in talking about MVC, ADR, et al.) that "All Pretend To Be Application Architectures." That assertion strikes me as incorrect. While it may be that developers using MVC may mistakenly think of MVC as an application architecture, the pattern description itself makes no such claim. Indeed, Fowler categorizes MVC as a "Web Presentation Pattern" and not as an "Application Architecture" per se. [...] Fowler's categorization and description of MVC define it pretty clearly as a user interface pattern. ADR, as a refinement of MVC, is likewise a user interface pattern.

He goes on to talk more about the ADR (Action-Domain-Responder) pattern, how it's more of a user interface pattern as well and how that relates to using it for HTTP requests. He suggests that the definition from Anthony may be a bit too broad and proposes the alternative "All Are User Interface Patterns, Not Entire Application Architectures" to be a bit more specific.

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opinion adr actiondomainresponder mvc modelviewcontroller deisgnpattern userinterface

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6079

Reddit.com:
What changes would you like to see in PHP 7?
January 20, 2015 @ 12:51:08

In the /r/php subreddit on Reddit.com a question was posed to the community: What changes would you like to see in PHP 7?. So far there's 80+ answers with a wide variety of responses.

As well as massive performance improvements, PHP 7's change / feature list is already looking great. You can find most of the features that have been accepted or are under discussion on the PHP Dev Wiki: RFCs section. But what changes would make a difference to you? What would you really like to see make it in (already suggested or a new suggestion)?

Here's just a few of the suggestions made by fellow Reddit users:

  • fixing inconsistencies in naming
  • sandboxed eval
  • a complete rework of the standard library
  • the introduction of generics
  • adding enum functionality
  • type aliasing
  • stack traces for fatal errors

Check out the full post for more ideas and feedback from other members of the community too. It's an interesting list of suggestions, some that are even already in the works.

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php7 changes reddit opinion community language feature improvement

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2sx5x3/what_changes_would_you_like_to_see_in_php_7/

Tony Marston:
Please do not break our language
January 15, 2015 @ 09:40:25

Tony Marston has posted a plea to the core developers of the PHP language when it comes to some of the changes happening with constructors in classes: "please do not break our language."

This post is addressed to PHP's core developers who are proposing to break our beloved language yet again in the next major version of PHP (version 7) by removing functionality which has worked perfectly for years simply because it does not fit in with their ideas of how it should be done today. I am talking about PHP RFC: Remove PHP 4 Constructors (and this post on php.internals) which proposes that all code with PHP 4 style constructors be made invalid in favour of the "correct" method which was introduced in PHP 5. This is despite the fact that both types of constructor have lived quite happily side by side for over a decade and that large volumes of code, including PEAR libraries, were written in the PHP 4 style.

He suggests that this kind of change would require quite a bit of code to be changed, causing headaches for a large audience out there using older PHP code. He then gets into some of his opinions and thoughts about who "owns" PHP - is it the core development team working on the language itself, the community that uses the language (or a combination of both)? He proposes two definitions of "improvement" in respect to the needs of developers using the language and core developers. He suggests that the core developers are changing the language "just because they can" and that breaking backwards compatibility with something like this is a big mistake.

He then shares some of the comments from the php.internals mailing list on the subject of the constructor change, both for and against. He also points out a few other places where backwards compatibility was broken and the resulting changes that had to be made by developers. He suggests a "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" kind of approach

If there is a choice between a lazy or incompetent core developer doing only half a job and leaving the 240 million members of the greater PHP community to clear up his mess, then it should be obvious to anyone who has more than two brain cells to rub together that it is the core developer who needs to put in the extra effort so that the greater PHP community does not have to.
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language opinion backwards compatibility break constructor php4 php5

Link: http://www.tonymarston.net/php-mysql/please-do-not-break-our-language.html

Dave Hulbert:
Thoughts on PSR-7
January 12, 2015 @ 12:51:03

In a new post to his site Dave Hulbert has shared some of his thoughts about the PSR-7 standard, a HTTP proposal for HTTP handling.

PSR-7 contains interfaces for HTTP messages. These are like Symfony Kernel's Request and Response interfaces. Having these new interfaces would be great for the PHP community but there's a couple of issues with their current state that I'm not happy with.

One of PSR-7's goals is "Keep the interfaces as minimal as possible". I think the current interfaces are not minimal enough.

He breaks down his thoughts into a few different sections covering ideas around:

  • Immutability and PSR-7's enforcement of mutability
  • Being too strict to the (HTTP) spec
  • Splitting client and server message interfaces
  • Writing and reading from StreamableInterface

He sums up his thoughts under each section pretty quickly. If you haven't heard much about the PSR-7 proposal and want more context on what he's referencing, check out this proposal (or other posts sharing opinions from other developers).

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opinion psr7 http specification message immutability streamableinterface

Link: http://createopen.com/design/php/2014/12/15/psr-7.html

Phil Sturgeon:
Developer Fallacies of 2014
January 12, 2015 @ 10:50:47

Phil Sturgeon has a post with several "developer fallacies" of 2014, a tongue-in-cheek list of things that some people were sharing as facts that just weren't.

Let's take a look back at some of the silly, shortsighted or patently false things people have been saying around the PHP community, and the development community in general, starting from January 1st 2014 and going through in rough chronological order.

Included in his list are things like:

  • No programmers ever get hired by recruiters
  • Framework agnostic code takes drastically longer to develop and release than framework specific code
  • Micro-services should probably always be .jar files instead
  • PHP 7.0 is a better name than PHP 6.0 because 7 is lucky in China
  • PHPNG is Zend's response to HHVM and they are the same thing
  • Maintaining CodeIgniter - when actively used by thousands of people - is a waste of time

Of course, all of these (and the rest of the list) are false and several of them are just based on things spread word of mouth or misinterpreted when shared from one person to another.

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developer fallacies 2014 opinion list

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/php/2015/01/10/developer-fallacies-2014/

Stefan Koopmanschap:
UWYC Use What You Can
January 05, 2015 @ 10:15:21

In his latest post, Stefan Koopmanschap shares an interesting idea he thinks more software developers would do well to adopt - Use what you can (or "don't do it yourself).

In her book, Amanda Palmer talks about DIY, and how when you start asking for help, Do It Yourself is a strange term. Instead, she suggests UWYC, which stands for Use What You Can. I think software developers can learn a lot from this mindset. As Palmer says: "I have no interest in Doing It Myself." This is exactly how we should approach software development.

He points out that, for the most part, the tasks and needs of most software have been solved. There already exists functionality to do those things, so why would you need to create your own? By doing so, you only increase your load as a developer, shifting the hard work of maintenance and improvement into your already loaded work schedule. He does make a good suggestion for using other people's code, though: filter the solutions (according to criteria like following good practices, documentation and if it's in active development).

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opinion code resuse diy usewhatyoucan

Link: http://leftontheweb.com/blog/2015/01/02/use-what-you-can/

Anthony Ferrara:
Being A Responsible Developer
December 30, 2014 @ 09:04:17

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara is back with more discussion around the "only supporting the latest versions" debate (here is the previous article). In this new post he talks about being a "responsible developer" and how that relates to keeping your software up to date.

The general consensus [shared during a DevHell and PHPTownHall Mashup ] was that as an ideology, only supporting latest versions is correct. From a practical standpoint though they said that it's unrealistic. That there are tons of legacy systems out there that are running just fine and can't justify the cost of upgrading. So they shouldn't have to upgrade "for ideological reasons". From one point of view, this certainly makes sense. [...] This point of view disturbs me deeply. And it further disturbs me that it came from the same person who preaches for testing.

He makes the connection between being responsible and the software upkeep through testing. He points out that the real effectiveness of automated testing is in preventing regressions - that is, when software is updated, that bugs don't reappear. He then goes on to share his opinion on some of the other arguments presented in the recording like the "if it ain't broke, don't fit it" and security issues topics. He also shares some number of the reality of what can happen if software is not up to date (or even patched) and how this circles back around to his previous points about software versions driving the OS and PHP versions forward.

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responsible developer opinion software version upgrade support

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/12/being-responsible-developer.html

Cal Evans:
Five influencers you should thank this year for making the PHP community so awesome
December 22, 2014 @ 11:47:56

Cal Evans, PHP community member extraordinaire, has a new post sharing his suggestions of the top five influencers in the PHP community that "make it awesome" and help make it one of the best he's been involved in.

It is no surprise to anyone who has talked to me for more than five minutes that I think the PHP community is the most vibrant and engaging developer community out there. So as we approach the end of the year, I am going to list out the influencers that help keep this community at the top. These are the people that you need to seek out and thank because without them, the PHP community would not be what it is today.

He goes with categories rather than mentioning names (because, really, there's way too many too name them all):

  • 5: Core Developers
  • 4: User Group Leaders
  • 3: Conference Organizers
  • 2: Conference Speakers, Bloggers, and Teachers
  • 1: Any developer using PHP

That last one, while it might seem like an "everyone else" kind of category, is one of the most important in my opinion. After all, what is a language without its users. Core developers and community group/event leaders wouldn't have anything to talk about if no one was there to talk. There would be no one to teach or be taught to and the core developers wouldn't have any reason to drive the language forward. Even if you're not well-known in the PHP community, you and your code are making a contribution to the community, even if only in a small way.

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top5 influencers thank opinion list core usergroup conference users blogger teacher

Link: http://blog.calevans.com/2014/12/21/five-influencers-thank-year-making-php-community-awesome/

Anthony Ferrara:
On PHP Version Requirements
December 22, 2014 @ 10:13:59

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara talks about PHP version requirements and how it's a bit of "chicken and egg" problem. If hosting providers are slow adopting even PHP 5.4, can we realistically bump up the minimum to PHP 5.4+ and potentially shun users not at that level yet?

Most people agreed with me [saying new software with a PHP requirement <= 5.2 is beyond irresponsible, it's negligent], saying that not targeting 5.4 or higher is bad. But some disagreed. Some disagreed strongly. So, I want to talk about that.

[...] Now, these are pretty interesting arguments. It boils down to making the logical argument that if hosts don't support 5.4+, then moving to require 5.4+ would leave the users who use those hosts abandoned. And some projects don't want to abandon users. It's a warm and logical idea; Open your arms to everyone, and include them all. Don't leave anyone behind. Really, it's a good argument. The problem is, is it based on a flawed premise...?

He suggests that it sounds somewhat like an appeal to emotion and that by enforcing a bump up like this would be "abandoning the users". He gets into some of the statistics he worked up regarding PHP versions, WordPress usage and how, because of these large numbers, hosting companies would make the move if only for business reasons. He talks about the "Go PHP5" initiative and the impact it made on versions supported across the board. He also looks at some of the reasons why keeping up with these versions is good for the hosting companies too: security, education of users and the new features that come with later versions.

So I put this to you, WordPress, CodeIgniter and every other CMS and Framework still supporting PHP 5.2 and 5.3 (and earlier versions): Step up and lead. Step up and be the change you want to see. Don't follow and react, lead and be proactive. After all, if we can move forward together, we can all benefit. But if we walk separate paths, we build walls and we all lose...
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version requirements opinion hosting project support

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/12/on-php-version-requirements.html

Christoph Rumpel:
10 Things That Will Make You a Better Developer
December 15, 2014 @ 10:56:19

Christoph Rumpel has posted a list of ten things he thinks will help you be a better programmer overall.

It is easy to become a web developer these days. The only things you need is a computer and Internet. But I believe there is big difference between a developer and a good one. Good developers are like little heroes. They are awesome in what they do and are there when you need them. A real benefit to the our world and definitely someone you can look up to! I believe everyone can make this step and start being a better developer today. This is why I asked great developers from all around the world what they think makes someone a really good developer.

His list covers more than just good coding practices too. He suggests things like:

  • Experimentation
  • Reading the code of other good developers
  • Just build websites
  • Contribute to other projects
  • Watch out for the Hypetrain
  • Never give up

He includes a quick summary of each of these and the rest of the top ten list too. Be sure to check out the full post for more.

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top10 better developer opinion list

Link: http://christoph-rumpel.com/2014/12/10-things-that-will-make-you-a-better-developer/


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