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Adam Wathan:
Customizing Keys When Mapping Collections
Jul 19, 2016 @ 10:52:29

Adam Wathan has a new post to his site talking about mapping with collections and customizing the keys when injecting new data into your Laravel collections.

People often ask me, “how do I specify keys when I’m mapping a collection?”

It actually ends up being a pretty interesting topic, so I decided to cover it in a short screencast, as well as in written format below.

He shows how to translate a simple set of data into a much more slimmed down version. He points out that the "map" function could be used but it doesn't allow for setting keys. Instead he talks briefly about how the problem could be solved in Javascript (returning an object instead of an array) and how to use the "reduce" method to filter and reset the data as it goes through the array. He finishes out the post talking about learning from other languages, the "toAssoc" macro on Laravel collections and mapping the data back to an array with a custom macro.

tagged: customize key mapping collection laravel object javascript example screencast

Link: https://adamwathan.me/2016/07/14/customizing-keys-when-mapping-collections/

Matt Stauffer:
Advanced operations with Collection::where in Laravel 5.3
Jul 15, 2016 @ 11:35:44

Matt Stauffer has continued his series looking at new features in Laravel 5.3 with a look at advanced operations on collections, specifically related to the "where" handling.

If you want to filter a Laravel collection to only those records which meet particular criteria, you're most likely going to reach for filter() or reject(). [...] You might not know it, but there's also a where() method that's pretty simple that gives you the same functionality.

He points out the main difference in Laravel 5.3 - the change from a strict check (the ===) to looser checking (==) and the ability to modify the operation to your liking. He also links to more information about this and other methods in the Laravel code on GitHub.

tagged: laravel collection where laravel53 feature series part6

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/advanced-operations-with-collectionwhere-in-laravel-5-3

Laravel News Podcast:
LN 21: Laracon Live Stream, Laravel 5.3 Collection Where Changes
Jul 13, 2016 @ 09:15:02

The Laravel News podcast has posted their latest episode today - Episode #21: Laracon Live Stream, Laravel 5.3 Collection Where Changes.

In this episode, we discuss Laracon Live Streaming, the new advanced where for Collections, and a few new apps and packages.

Other topics mentioned include the release of the first stable version of the OctoberCMS, the Laravel Password package and an article about anonymous functions. You can listen to this latest show either using the in-page audio player or by subscribing on iTunes or Google Play and also get future episodes as they're released.

tagged: laravelnews laravel podcast news ep21 ericbarnes laraconus collection packages

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/07/ln-21-laracon-live-stream-laravel-5-3-collection-changes/

Freek Van der Herten:
Debugging collections
Jun 17, 2016 @ 09:47:42

Freek Van der Herten has a post to his site with a guide about debugging collections in Laravel applications. He quickly shows how to use the "macro" functionality to gather more insight into what's happening inside.

Lately I’ve been working a lot with collections in Laravel. If you’re not in the know: a collection is a sort of super charged array with a lot of powerful functions to transform the data inside it. The only thing I found a bit of a hassle is how to debug the various steps in a collection chain. Here’s how I improved the workflow.

He shows a simple collection setup with a chain of functions being applied to transform the data inside (ex: filter, map, sortBy). He was able to get a bit more information by using the dd helper Laravel provides but it's not the most "clean" way to just wrap the collection on it. Instead he proposes he use of a "macro" to call the dd function and keep it in the flow of the methods called on the collection (as ->dd()).

tagged: debug collection laravel dd helper function macro

Link: https://murze.be/2016/06/debugging-collections/

PHP Session Garbage Collection: The unknown performance bottleneck
May 09, 2016 @ 12:49:22

On the Tideways.com blog there's a tutorial talking about the "unknown performance bottleneck" that can be caused by PHP's own session garbage collection. This garbage collection happens when sessions expire and they need to be removed from the current set/data source.

Here is one performance setting in your PHP configuration you probably haven't thought about much before: How often does PHP perform random garbage collection of outdated session data in your application? Did you know that because of the shared nothing architecture PHP randomly cleans old session data whenever session_start() is called? An operation that is not necessarily cheap.

It's his general advice to avoid PHP's random garbage collection (it happens one in every 1000 requests, randomly) and opt for a more consistent method using background scripts. He gives an example using the Laravel framework and it's modified session garbage collection happening every 50th request (making use of the Symfony Finder component). He points out the problem with its implementation and the negative impact it could have on large, highly used applications. They share some of their own statistics and how to change this default (modifying the lottery option and making a custom "cleanup" command).

tagged: session garbage collection performance bottleneck unknown modify laravel symfony

Link: https://tideways.io/profiler/blog/php-session-garbage-collection-the-unknown-performance-bottleneck

Adam Wathan:
Cleaning Up Form Input with Transpose
Apr 15, 2016 @ 11:50:34

Adam Wathan has a post on his site showing you how to use "transpose" functionality to clean up form input, transforming a set of arrays from submitted data back into a better structure.

Transpose is an often overlooked list operation that I first noticed in Ruby. The goal of transpose is to rotate a multidimensional array, turning the rows into columns and the columns into rows.

In his example, he adding multiple "contacts" at once. He shows the difficulties with this, the form structure and the data returned. There's several formats that could be returned but none are the correct structure to push into a model (his examples are in Laravel there's a generic array_map example too) He shows how to update the Laravel collection handling using a custom macro, transpose, to handle the array_map functionality in a more self-contained way. He includes the code to make the macro work and an example of it in use to correctly format his incoming contact data into something he can use in his collection.

tagged: transpose laravel collection array data format arraymap

Link: http://adamwathan.me/2016/04/06/cleaning-up-form-input-with-transpose/

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
On PSR7 and HTTP Headers
Jul 29, 2015 @ 09:47:59

Matthew Weier O'Phinney has a new post to his site talking about PSR-7 and HTTP headers and how they (headers) are handled in the structure of this PHP-FIG specification.

Yesterday, a question tagged #psr7 on Twitter caught my eye: "When I call $request->getHeader('Accept') for example, I was expected that I'll get [an array] but, in reality I got [a string]. Is this correct?" In this post, I'll explain why the behavior observed is correct, as well as shed a light on a few details of header handling in PSR-7.

He talks about the planning that went into PSR-7 and how they had to work around some of the "flexibility" (quirks) in the HTTP specification. This was especially true when it came to repeated headers. He also walks through their thoughts on multiple header handling and that custom header values are allowed. Because of these two things, they decided to treat all headers as collections and, despite there being separators already in the values. Instead they collected headers of the same types into these collections, some containing only one value while others could contain multiple. Back to the question - this explains why the "Accept" header they desired was still in its comma-separated form and not split into the array they expected.

The [...] example provides another good lesson: Complex values should have dedicated parsers. PSR-7 literally only deals with the low-level details of an HTTP message, and provides no interpretation of it. Some header values, such as the Accept header, require dedicated parsers to make sense of the value.
tagged: psr7 http header collection separator multiple single

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2015-07-28-on-psr7-headers.html

Remi Collet:
PHP 7.0 as Software Collection
Mar 26, 2015 @ 10:15:48

Remi Collet has a new post today talking about the next major release of the PHP language - PHP 7 - and how it, in its current state, can be installed now as an RPM from the "remi" repository as a software collection.

RPM of upcoming major version of PHP 7.0, are available in remi repository for Fedora 20, 21, 22 and Enterprise Linux 6, 7 (RHEL, CentOS, ...) in a fresh new Software Collection (php70) allowing its installation beside the system version. As I strongly believe in SCL potential to provide a simple way to allow installation of various versions simultaneously, and as I think it is useful to offer this feature to allow developers to test their applications, to allow sysadmin to prepare a migration or simply to use this version for some specific application, I decide to create this new SCL.

Instructions for the installation (via yum) are included and a list of some things "to be noticed" about the setup are also included.

tagged: php7 software collection fedora enterprise linux rpm yum install remi repository

Link: http://blog.famillecollet.com/post/2015/03/25/PHP-7.0-as-Software-Collection

Kevin Schroeder:
If you develop for Magento, know your indexes
Feb 02, 2015 @ 09:34:19

Kevin Schroeder makes a suggestion to all of the Magento developers out there - be sure to know your indexes and how to use them to your advantage.

When I first got into Magento development, in my mind, there were two ways of getting data from the database. You would either call Mage::getModel(‘catalog/product’)->load($id) or you would work with the collection. If you wanted to get a filtered list of something you would use the ORM to get it. But as I’ve gained more experience (fairly quickly, I might add) I realized that there was more to the puzzle. A good portion of this is because I work with Magento ECG and some of the best Magento devs and architects can be found there and I’m a quick learner.

He gives an example of going beyond the usual one-to-one relationship most people use with Magento's models. He includes an example of wanting to fetch a list of all products in the same category as another and the "anit-pattern" that comes with it. Instead he offers the solution of an index, a simple one that merges the catalog category and product index ID. This makes using a custom query with a handy join much easier and much faster.

tagged: magento database collection query index tutorial category

Link: http://www.eschrade.com/page/if-you-develop-for-magento-know-your-indexes/

Anthony Ferrara:
What About Garbage?
Dec 03, 2014 @ 13:33:44

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara looks at a recent change in the Composer dependency management tool involving a major speed boost, just from disabling the garbage collection.

If you've been following the news, you'll have noticed that yesterday Composer got a bit of a speed boost. And by "bit of a speed boost", we're talking between 50% and 90% speed increase depending on the complexity of the dependencies. But how did the fix work? And should you make the same sort of change to your projects? For those of you who want the TL/DR answer: the answer is no you shouldn't.

He talks about what the actual (one line) change was that sped things up but goes on to talk about why doing this isn't necessarily a good thing. He covers how PHP handles variables internally, how it relates to "pointers" and the copy-on-write functionality. He includes code snippets and gives an overview of how each would be handled by the interpreter. Unfortunately, the way PHP handles things, deleting a variable only removes variable reference, not the value, but does decrement the reference count for it. When that hits 0, garbage collection kicks in and removes associated values too.

He talks about a few other kinds of garbage collection (the reference count method is just one of them) and circles back around to how this relates to Composer's functionality. He points out the number of objects created during the dependency resolution process and what can happen when the root buffer, populated with all of these objects, gets too full (hint: garbage collection). He finishes the post talking about how, in Composer's case, the garbage collection change yielded the performance impact it did, but doesn't suggest it for every project. He also makes a few suggestions as to things that could be done to improve PHP's garbage collection handling.

tagged: garbage collection handling composer disable detail

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/12/what-about-garbage.html