Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

Matt Stauffer:
The new Notification system in Laravel 5.3
Oct 20, 2016 @ 09:32:44

In the latest part of his series covering Laravel 5.3, Matt Stauffer has posted this new tutorial covering the new notification system in the latest version of the popular Laravel framework.

In a previous blog post I've covered Laravel's new Mailable feature, which introduces some important changes to how we send mail in Laravel. I'd recommend at least skimming it if you haven't read it yet. In short, the preferred mail syntax is no longer sending mail using the "classic" mail closures, but instead creating a "Mailable" class for each message you want to send—for example, the "WelcomeNewUser" mailable class.

In Laravel 5.3, we have another new feature for communicating with our users: Notifications.

This notification system makes it simpler to send messages to your user when you don't care as much how they get it, just that they do. He walks you through the creation of your first notification class and breaks it down into its main parts, explaining each one. He shows how to define the different handlers for the notification types (like "toEmail") and how to trigger the notification, passing in either a single user or all users in the system. He then talks about the channels that are available to notifications and how to integrate several including Nexmo, database and the "broadcast" channel.

tagged: laravel notification system tutorial introduction channel trigger

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/the-new-notification-system-in-laravel-5-3

SitePoint PHP Blog:
From HTTP Messages to PSR-7: What’s It All About?
Oct 06, 2016 @ 11:57:03

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted hoping to demystify some of the confusion around HTTP and PSR-7, a standard from the PHP-FIG group around the handling of request and response messages in PHP applications.

The PHP Framework Interoperability Group (PHP-FIG) has relatively recently approved another proposal, the PSR-7: HTTP Messages Interface. The document crystallizes HTTP messages into 7 interfaces which a PHP library should implement if they subscribe to the specification. In PSR-7 By Example, Matthew Weier O’Phinney, editor of the PSR, gives an interesting overview of the specification. So what is it?

They start with the HTTP side of things, briefly covering what HTTP messages are and the format they're transmitted in. Using some example curl requests they show requests and responses involving normal responses, redirects and how they're broken down into objects implementing the MessageInterface, RequestInterface and ResponseInterface. They outline the PSR-7 specification in a UML diagram and talk about some of the challenges associated with PSR-7's handling (including the use of immutable objects and how it fits in with middleware handling).

The post ends with a listing of a few of the frameworks/libraries that already make use of the PSR-7 structure including Symfony, Slim, Guzzle and the HTTPlug client.

tagged: psr7 http messages tutorial introduction phpfig standard

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/from-http-messages-to-psr-7-whats-it-all-about/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Phpseclib: Securely Communicating with Remote Servers via PHP
Oct 04, 2016 @ 13:37:33

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial by Viraj Khatavkar showing how to use the phpseclib library to securely communicate with remote servers directly from your PHP code.

PHP has an SSH2 library which provides access to resources (shell, remote exec, tunneling, file transfer) on a remote machine using a secure cryptographic transport. Objectively, it is a tedious and highly frustrating task for a developer to implement it due to its overwhelming configuration options and complex API with little documentation.

The phpseclib (PHP Secure Communications Library) package has a developer friendly API. It uses some optional PHP extensions if they’re available and falls back on an internal PHP implementation otherwise. To use this package, you don’t need any non-default PHP extensions installed.

The first step is getting the library installed (via Composer) and a few example use cases including generating SSH keys dynamically and testing a SSH/SFTP connection. The tutorial then talks about three methods you can use with phpseclib to connect to remote servers: using an RSA key, using a password-protected RSA key and just the normal username/password combination. With the connection made they then show you how to:

  • execute (single and multiple) commands on the remote server
  • exit on the first error
  • gather the output from the commands

There's also a bit included about some other interesting configuration options and a few alternatives to the library if phpseclib doesn't work exactly right for your application.

tagged: phpseclib security communication server library tutorial introduction

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/phpseclib-securely-communicating-with-remote-servers-via-php/

Master Zend Framework:
How to Begin Migrating From Zend Framework 2 to Zend Expressive
Oct 04, 2016 @ 12:29:21

The Master Zend Framework site has posted a new tutorial showing you how to start the process of migrating to Zend Expressive in your current from Zend Framework 2 application.

If you are managing one or more Zend Framework 2 applications, did you know that you can already begin porting them to Zend Expressive? In this tutorial, you will learn how you can start doing so today, using the Zend/PSR-7 bridge.

He starts with a little background on Zend Expressive and how it compares to Zend Framework 2. He also shares his opinions on the "just start from scratch" idea that's so tempting when migrating from one framework to another...that almost always leads to disaster. He then breaks down the migration process (using the zend-psr7bridge) into four steps, each with related code:

  • Create The Middleware Class
  • Initialize the Middleware
  • Configure the ServiceManager
  • Configure the Routes

He concludes with a few final thoughts about the migration from ZF2 to Expressive and how, with the help of this middleware setup, it can be a much smoother and easier transition.

tagged: migrate zendframework zendexpresssive psr7bridge tutorial framework introduction

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/migrate-from-zendframework2-to-zendexpressive/

CloudWays Blog:
Getting Started With Silex Micro-Framework On Cloud Hosting
Sep 19, 2016 @ 11:54:34

On the CloudWays blog they've posted a tutorial that introduces you to the Silex framework, a product from SensioLabs of Symfony fame and using it on a cloud hosting platform (their own).

Extensibility is one of the main aims of web app development projects. However, there are times when you need to get things up and running as soon as possible and with minimum time dedicated to coding. This is where micro-framework s really outshine the competition. There is a long list of these frameworks including Silex, Slim, Lumen, etc. These are ideal for developing small-scale applications with clean code and user defined directory structures.

In this tutorial I am going to explain how to install Silex, its operation, directory structure, Routings and HTTP Requests. Silex is a micro-framework written in Symfony and inspired by Sinatra, a DSL for quickly creating web applications in Ruby with minimal effort.

They start by helping you get the CloudWays instance up and running with their "PHPStack" setup. Once created they show how to get to a command prompt, make the public HTML directory and use Composer to install Silex and Twig (for templating). The tutorial then briefly covers the directory structure for the site and the code to create the Silex application instance. They define some of the basic routing (to work with book data) and show the handling for sending feedback submitted via a simple page. The remainder of the tutorial shows the use of different features of Silex including: providers, middleware, before/after handlers and defining controllers as classes.

tagged: silex introduction tutorial microframework symfony

Link: https://www.cloudways.com/blog/install-silex-on-cloud/

Understanding the Laravel Service Container
Sep 13, 2016 @ 12:56:04

The Dotdev.co blog has posted a tutorial for the Laravel users out there with the goal of helping you understand the Laravel service container, a key part of the framework's functionality and an extensible feature you can adapt to some of your own needs.

Learning how to build an application with Laravel is not just about learning to use the different classes and components within the framework, it is not about remembering all artisan commands or remembering all helper functions (we have Google for that). Learning to code with Laravel is learning the philosophy of Laravel, its elegance and its beautiful syntax. I personally feel it is an art and a craft (its not a coincidence that Laravel developers are sometimes referred to as Web artisans). This is true for any other framework as well.

A major part of Laravel’s philosophy is the Service Container or IoC container. As a Laravel developer, understanding and using the Service Container properly is a crucial part in mastering your craft, as it is the core of any Laravel application.

The post starts with some of the basics about the container and how objects/instances are bound to it. They give an example of binding a FooService class in the "register" methods of providers. A code example is also included showing how to use the service you previously bound. There's also a description of binding interfaces in the IoC, making it easier for custom classes to resolve interfaces when they're implemented. The post wraps up with a bit covering the resolving of dependencies and the code you'll need to set them up.

tagged: laravel service container introduction tutorial framework bind

Link: https://dotdev.co/understanding-laravel-service-container-bd488ca05280#.9gd6v3t4l

Master Zend Framework:
How To Build a Local Development Environment Using Docker
Sep 02, 2016 @ 11:57:05

The Master Zend Framework site has posted a tutorial helping you create a Docker-based development environment complete with PHP, MySQL and Apache working happily together.

Why in this modern day and age is setting up a development environment still such a complicated process? [...] Why is it still so hard to get one setup that works, that does what you need, and that matches the deployment environment’s of testing, staging, production and so on?

[...] By now our development environments have grown quite sophisticated. But the overhead of both building and maintaining them has increased significantly also. Wouldn’t it be easy if we could set them up, but with only a small investment of time and effort? I think you know where I might be heading with this. You can. Yes, that’s right, you can. Ever heard of Docker?

He then starts in on introducing Docker (for those not already familiar) and how it differs from a VirtualBox/Vagrant setup that's already become quite popular. He talks about "containers" and the role they play as well as an overview of the environment he's going to show you how to create. He then helps you get Docker installed, explains how the containers will work together and provides the Docker YAML configuration for each of them. The docker-compose command is then used to bring the environment up, downloading the containers as needed. The final result of his setup is a set of containers running together to serve up a Zend Framework Skeleton Application.

tagged: docker local development environment tutorial introduction mysql apache zendframework skeleton

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/docker-development-environment/

Cloudways Blog:
How To Create Simple Rest API In Symfony 3.1
Aug 30, 2016 @ 12:59:10

The Cloudways blog has posted a new tutorial helping you get up and running quickly with a simple REST API written using the Symfony framework. In the article they not only explain how to create the API but also include a bit of REST theory for those not completely familiar with the terms and functionality involved.

Symfony is fast becoming the favourite framework among developers for rapid application development. And despite releasing Symfony 3.1 and 3.2 in the previous quarter, they are still introducing many changes and upgrades. If you’re still using the previous versions, you must upgrade Symfony Framework to the latest and stable version 3.1.

Yes! We know that Symfony is one of the best frameworks to develop rest API, so in this article we will make simple rest API in Symfony 3.1. I am assuming that you’ve already setup PHPstack application on Cloudways with Symfony installed, but if you haven’t, follow this installation guide.

They briefly talk about the REST HTTP verb types and what kind of actions they relate to. With that defined the tutorial then gets into the requirements including the installation of two bundles: JMSSerializerBundle and NelmioCorsBundle. From there examples of configuration changes, commands to make users and execute migrations on the local database are included. With this system set up they include sample code for each HTTP verb type letting you perform the actions on the User entity (create, read, update and delete).

tagged: symfony rest api simple tutorial introduction phpstack

Link: https://www.cloudways.com/blog/rest-api-in-symfony-3-1/

Easy and Fast Emails with Laravel 5.3 Mailables
Aug 26, 2016 @ 11:32:01

The Scotch.io blog has posted another Laravel-related tutorial, this time focusing in on "mailables", a new feature in the latest release of Laravel (v5.3) that makes sending emails simpler.

Laravel 5.3 has just been released and there are a ton of great new features. One of the major improvements is in how you send mail in your applications.

They start with a look at how you might send emails in previous versions of the Laravel framework using the Mail::send method with a set of options and a callback. The tutorial then moves on to v5.3 and introduces the idea behind "mailables" and some simple examples. They show how to create a custom mailable-based class and the resulting code. They walk you through how to pass data into the email views, changing up the mailer configuration, sending extra parameters and sending the emails. They also include information about email queueing using Laravel's built-in queuing functionality.

tagged: easy email laravel v53 mailable tutorial introduction

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/easy-and-fast-emails-with-laravel-5-3-mailables`

Matt Trask:
Looking at Ramsey UUID
Aug 24, 2016 @ 09:16:56

Matt Trask has put together a new post spotlighting a handy library that's widely used across the PHP ecosystem for generating UUIDs: ramsey/uuid.

Welcome to the first installment in my 2113918230981 part series, "Better know a Package!". Tonight's package: the famous/infamous Uuid package that that taught us all what Ramsey is in Scottish, Rhumsaa. Created to give PHP a library to generate Universal Unique Identifiers, this library has been a stallwort in the community. Ben Ramsey created it first under the Rhumsaa namesapce before moving it to the Ramsey namespace, saving us all from learning more Scottish then we needed to ever learn.

[...] A UUID, or Universally Unique Identifier, will generate a 128 bite unique key in different series based on the version you asked for. RFC-4122 dictates how Uuids should be generated, and recommends 4 types.

Matt then goes on to describe each of the different UUID types and provides some code examples as illustration:

  • Version 1: Time and MAC addressed based Uuid
  • Version 2: DCE-based
  • Version 3: UUIDs based on a namespace and then it is MD5 hashed
  • Version 4: Random generation (based on the output of random_bytes

He also includes examples of the UUIDs output by each method (not much difference there as the structure of the resulting UUID is all the same).

tagged: uuid ramsey library introduction types namespace random mac time tutorial

Link: http://matthewtrask.net/blog/Looking-At-Ramsey-Uuid/