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Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Starting a New PHP Package The Right Way
January 27, 2015 @ 12:08:09

In part one of a new series on the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc looks at the right way to start a PHP package using a set of guidelines that have evolved recently in well-structured, well-tested PHP packages.

In recent years, good standards for PHP package design have popped up, in no small part due to Composer, Packagist, The League and, most recently, The Checklist. Putting all these in a practical list we can follow here, but avoiding any tight coupling with The League (since our package won't be submitted there - it's specifically made for a third party API provider and as such very limited in context).

The list of rules includes topics like having a license selected, using PSR-4 autoloading and having in-depth code comments. Bruno uses these as a foundation and starts in on the creation of a package. He uses the PHP League skeleton structure to create the files and folders for a basic package. From there he updates the contents with details for his Diffbot example and installing other needed software libraries. The rest of the post is broken up into the two remaining steps and examples under each: sticking with the PSR-2 guidelines and planning for the structure of the package.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/starting-new-php-package-right-way/

NetTuts.com:
Design Patterns The Simple Factory Pattern
January 27, 2015 @ 11:53:20

NetTuts.com has posted the next part of their series focusing on design patterns (and more specifically implementing them in PHP). In this latest post they look at a simple version of the Factory design pattern.

When you think of a factory, what comes to mind? For me, it's a place where things are created - that is, it's a centralized placed where things are produced. Later, the delivery of said products are done by the factory based on an order. Let's say that you're requesting a car. A factory will create one based on the specifications of the work order and will then deliver it once it's complete. Just as their real world counterparts, a software factory (that is, software that implements the factory design pattern), is an object that is responsible for creating and delivering other objects based on incoming parameters.

They mention the three different versions of the factory pattern but focus in on the simplest one (hence the "simple" in the title). They continue on with the car example, showing how to use a simple factory (a "carFactory") to build an instance of the "Car" class based on different classes of car types. The object is constructed when a "build" method is called with the type.

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Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/design-patterns-the-simple-factory-pattern--cms-22345

Coder on Code:
Design Patterns in PHP Adapters
January 26, 2015 @ 10:46:42

The Coder on Code site has posted a new tutorial covering the Adapter design pattern in detail. They talk about what the pattern is, what it can be useful for and include some code to illustrate.

The adapter pattern also referred as the wrapper pattern, I find that wrapper is a more fitting name since it describes clearly what this pattern does; it encapsulates the functionality of a class or object into a class with a common public interfaces. [...] Adapters are one of the easiest patterns to comprehend and at the same time one of the most useful ones.

He starts with some of the basic definitions of terms involved in the pattern: client, adapter and adapteee. His example centers around a notification manager class that lets you switch types between Twitter, Email and SMS messaging. His initial code has all of the message types handled in one class method. He shows how to refactor this out to an interface and a set of child classes, each with the corresponding handling in a "sendNotification" method. These are then used by an adapter in the main class to send the given message. This simplifies the main messenger class and contributes to the overall improvement of architecture and testability of the application.

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Link: http://coderoncode.com/2015/01/25/design-patterns-in-php-adapters.html

Matthias Noback:
A wave of command buses
January 07, 2015 @ 10:01:18

In his latest post Matthias Noback looks at the recent interest in command bus handling in the PHP community. He introduces the concept for those not familiar with it and how it's handled in most of the command libraries.

Recently many people in the PHP community have been discussing a thing called the "command bus". The Laravel framework nowadays contains an implementation of a command bus and people have been talking about it in several vodcasts. [...] Since I consider this topic to be a very important and highly relevant one, I will spend several blog posts on it, explaining the concepts in my own terms, then introducing SimpleBus as a ready-made solution for your everyday PHP projects.

He starts with the definition of a command as something used "separate the technical aspects of user input from their meaning inside the application", a request from the client for the application to perform a task. He gives a simple example of a command (SignUp) and how it would be sent to the bus for handling. He lists some of the advantages of using commands like this, including the separation it allows between things like controllers and the actual functionality. He finishes up the post with a look at the actual command handler (with sample code) and the one-to-one relationship they have with the actual command.

Using commands you can separate the web-specific parts of your application from its essence. Commands define the use cases of your application and provide an internal API for anyone that might want to do something with your application.
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Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2015/01/a-wave-of-command-buses/

TheoDo.fr:
Clean Architecture
December 23, 2014 @ 10:37:28

In an article on Thedo.fr Tristan Roussel introduces you to some of the concepts behind Clean Architecture based on a talk he recently attended at a local Symfony user group.

One particular talk retained my attention and I want to tell you about it. Let me warn you first, this is just an introduction, and I'm not going into much detail, don't hesitate to post comments if you feel something is not clear, or deserves a better exposure! [...] So. What is Clean Architecture? It's so fresh that it doesn't even have a Wikipedia article.

He starts off with what the idea of Clean Architecture is trying to accomplish and where some of the ideas have evolved from. He includes some of the objectives and guiding principles as well as a diagram of how this architecture might be laid out. He gets into an actual use case for this type of structure and where abstract entities, controllers and presenters fit into the picture. He links to some of the code as provided as part of the presentation and some of the things to consider when trying it out for your application.

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Link: http://www.theodo.fr/blog/2014/12/sfpot-paris-2014-12-12-pepiniere-27/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
AngularJS in Drupal Apps
December 16, 2014 @ 12:23:31

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial posted (by Daniel Sipos) about combining Drupal and AngularJS to make for more front-end focused, responsive applications.

Angular.js is the hot new thing right now for designing applications in the client. Well, it's not so new anymore but is sure as hell still hot, especially now that it's being used and backed by Google. It takes the idea of a JavaScript framework to a whole new level and provides a great basis for developing rich and dynamic apps that can run in the browser or as hybrid mobile apps. In this article I am going to show you a neat little way of using some of its magic within a Drupal 7 site. A simple piece of functionality but one that is enough to demonstrate how powerful Angular.js is and the potential use cases even within heavy server-side PHP frameworks such as Drupal.

He walks you through the creation of a simple addition of a block that lists out the titles of some other nodes. You'll need an existing Drupal installation to follow along (no setup instructions here) as well as an Angular structure for a small application. He starts with the module configuration and creates custom handling to return the JSON result back to the waiting JS connection. Then he creates the custom template and block that the AngularJS will output the results too. Finally, with that rendering, he glues them both together in an Angular controller that loads the results when an "Open" button is clicked.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/angularjs-drupal-apps/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Using Traits in Doctrine Entities
December 09, 2014 @ 12:16:56

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a recent post showing you how to use traits with Doctrine entities. PHP's traits allow for the inclusion of functionality into a class without having to extend another class or create an object to use it.

Since PHP 5.4.0, PHP supports a pretty way to reuse code called "Traits" - a set of methods that you can include within another class in order not to repeat yourself. You can read more about traits in previously published SitePoint posts: here, here and here. Today, I am going to show you how they can be used with Doctrine ORM in a Symfony Environment.

He shows how to create two basic Doctrine entities, in this case representing "Article" and "Comment" instances. He then creates the trait, a "TimestampableTrait" class that abstracts out the setting/updating of the create and updated date on the Doctrine record. He refactors the entities to use the trait and shows the results of the "schema create" command.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/using-traits-doctrine-entities/

Michael Dowling:
Transducers in PHP
December 08, 2014 @ 09:28:48

Michael Dowling has a new post to his site announcing a project he's recent released to try to bring some of the functionality of Clojure to PHP with the introduction of transducers.

Rich Hickey recently announced that transducers are going to be added to Clojure, and it prompted a bit brief announcement, Hickey followed up with a couple videos that describe transducers in much more detail: Transducers and Inside Transducers + more.async. Transducers are a very powerful concept that can be utilized in almost any language. In fact, they have been ported to various other languages including JavaScript (2), Python, Ruby, Java, and Go. And now…transducers are available in PHP via transducers.php!

He starts with an official definition of what a transducer is from the Clojure documentation then explains it in a bit more layman's terms as "a fancy way of saying that you can use functions like map and filter on basically any type of data source (not just sequences)" and can output any kind of structure as a result. He then gets into some code examples using his project showing eager and lazy evaluation, how they're composable and a list of the ones the library makes available (and what they do). He then gets into a more complete example of their application with a streams example, working with/modifying a string. He ends the post looking at how to create your own custom transducer and how they compare to generators.

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Link: http://mtdowling.com/blog/2014/12/04/transducers-php/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Build an OctoberCMS Theme
December 03, 2014 @ 09:17:55

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new post in their series covering the OctoberCMS today, this time looking at how to create a custom theme. They walk you through the creation of a simple "blogging" theme type with posts, categories and home/about pages.

October CMS is the new star in the sky of CMSes. Built on top of Laravel, it promises joyful coding and a back to basics approach. Read our introduction here and find out how to build plugins for it here. In this article, we're going to see how we can build a theme.

Their theme makes use of the rainlab plugin allowing for the use of Markdown content in your posts. They start by adding in the directories and base files needed for the theme to the "themes" directory. With the plugin installed they start working through the configuration content and setup of the theme files including PHP and markup sections. He also shows how to use placeholders, partials and layouts in the content of the posts. Next is the static pages, About and Home, with a bit simpler configuration. The code is then included for the remainder of the pages: single posts, categories and the post listing.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/build-octobercms-theme/

Anthony Ferrara:
It's All About Time
December 01, 2014 @ 10:46:15

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara talks about a tricky subject in PHP - timing attacks. A timing attack has to do with vulnerabilities that can come up because of the differences in time it takes to perform cryptographic operations (like hashing or encrypting).
An interesting pull request has been opened against PHP to make bin2hex() constant time. This has lead to some interesting discussion on the mailing list (which even got me to reply :-X). There has been pretty good coverage over remote timing attacks in PHP, but they talk about string comparison. I'd like to talk about other types of timing attacks.

He starts with a definition of what a remote timing attack is and provides an example of a simple script showing the delay that's key to the attack. His script deals with string location but it gives you an idea of how the attack works and where the danger lies. He points out that even remotely attackers could determine the times to perform operations (down to the nanosecond) and use this to their advantage. He points out that both == and === are vulnerable to this type of attack because of how the comparison happens. He gives two options (one an internal function) to help protect your application and briefly covers a few other types of timing attacks: index lookup, cache-timing and branch-based timing attacks.

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Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/11/its-all-about-time.html


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