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SitePoint PHP Blog:
First Look at Platform.sh - a Development and Deployment SaaS
March 23, 2015 @ 11:24:36

In this latest post to the SitePoint PHP blog Chris Ward takes a "first look" at the Platform.sh development and deployment service.

Not so long ago, many of us were satisfied handling deployment of our projects by uploading files via FTP to a web server. [...] The old methods for deploying became unstable, unreliable and (generally) untrusted. [...] So was born a new wave of tools, services and workflows designed to simplify the process of deploying complex web applications, along with a plethora of accompanying commercial services. Generally, they offer an integrated toolset for version control, hosting, performance and security at a competitive price. Platform.sh is a newer player on the market, built by the team at Commerce Guys, who are better known for their Drupal eCommerce solutions.

He talks about some of the requirements for using the service (including Drush, the Drupal command line tool) and how to get started with a new project. He shows how to get the codebase with their CLI tool, pushing SQL data up to the instance, and starting in on some development work. He shows how to configure the modules you want to use and adding some additional content to the data. He also covers some of the other features of Platform.sh including: performance and profiling tools and integration with Redis, Solr and the EntityCache/AuthCache tools.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/first-look-platform-sh-development-deployment-saas/

Scotch.io:
S.O.L.I.D The First 5 Principles of Object Oriented Design
March 19, 2015 @ 10:30:47

On Scotch.io today they've posted a tutorial about SOLID, the "first five principles of object oriented design". SOLID is an acronym made from the first letter of several principles that can help make your OOP code well-architected and easier to test.

S.O.L.I.D is an acronym for the first five object-oriented design(OOD) principles by Robert C. Martin, popularly known as Uncle Bob. These principles, when combined together, make it easy for a programmer to develop software that are easy to maintain and extend. They also make it easy for developers to avoid code smells, easily refactor code, and are also a part of the agile or adaptive software development. Note: this is just a simple "welcome to S.O.L.I.D" article, it simply sheds light on what S.O.L.I.D is.

They start with a basic overview of what the letters in SOLID stand for and then work through each, providing basic code examples to help make the point clearer.

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Link: https://scotch.io/bar-talk/s-o-l-i-d-the-first-five-principles-of-object-oriented-design

Medium.com:
PHP7 More strict! (but only if you want it to be)
March 18, 2015 @ 10:48:38

In this new article Er Galvao Abbott talks about the struggle (and finally, inclusion) of type hinting in PHP, more specifically coming in PHP7, and how strict they can be.

It wasn't easy (we knew it wouldn't be) and certainly wasn't pretty (we sort of knew that as well), but it's finally official: PHP7 will come with Scalar Type Hints (STH) and an optional "strict mode". [...] This is basically a step towards a more strict way of coding in PHP. Will we see more steps in that direction in the future? We don't know and we're OK with that for now. What's brilliant about the body of work represented by these RFCs is that by implementing their concepts and specially making the "strict mode" optional the choice of being more strict remains with the programmer.

He talks some about the background of the want and need for strict typing in PHP and mentions three RFCs that will influence the type hints and handling in PHP7:

He summarizes each RFC and what it contributes to the language. He ends the post by dispelling one thing about all of this new typing functionality - PHP will remain loosely typed, this new functionality is in a "strict mode" only used when specified.

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php7 strict type hint mode rfc introduction feature

Link: https://medium.com/@galvao/php7-more-strict-but-only-if-you-want-it-to-be-78d6690f2090

ServerGrove Blog:
Symfony2 components overview Stopwatch
March 17, 2015 @ 11:12:40

The ServerGrove blog has returned with another of their overviews of a specific Symfony2 component. In this new article they talk about the Stopwatch component, a useful way to help in profiling execution of your application.

It's been a long wait, but we are back again with the Symfony2 components series. In the 12th post of the series, we cover the Stopwatch component. Even though is one of the smallest ones, that does not mean is not important, as plays a crucial role when we want to profile our code.

Since the article series is about working with the component individually, they show you how to get it installed via Composer by itself. They include a simple example of it in use, starting/stopping a "test" timer, getting the duration and getting the overall memory consumption. They also include a slightly more complex example timing the execution of a Fibonacci sequence, reporting back the execution time on each line of output. The article also covers other features like the "lap" method, sections for grouping events and the difficulties you'd have extending it.

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symfony2 component overview stopwatch introduction

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/03/16/symfony2-components-overview-stopwatch/

Hailoapp.com:
A Journey into Microservices
March 11, 2015 @ 11:23:34

On the Hailo.com blog Matt Heath has posted a series of articles about their transition from a "monolith" codebase out into a set of microservices for the Hallo app system.

Hailo, like many startups, started small; small enough that our offices were below deck on a boat in central London - the HMS President. Working on a boat as a small focused team, we built out our original apps and APIs using tried and tested technologies, including Java, PHP, MySQL and Redis, all running on Amazon's EC2 platform. [...] After we launched in London, and then Dublin, we expanded from one continent to two, and then three; launching first in North America, and then in Asia. This posed a number of challenges-the main one being locality of customer data.

They describe this customer data problem in a bit more detail with the issue mostly revolving around the geolocation of the user and their information. They talk about "going global" and the steps they took to make the move. In the three parts of the series, they explain the changes they made and why they were effective for their application:

They end the series with some links to other resources that help compliment the subjects mentioned and link to slides from a presentation around the same topic.

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microservice journey series part1 part2 part3 introduction architecture api halloapp

Link: https://sudo.hailoapp.com/services/2015/03/09/journey-into-a-microservice-world-part-1/

Freek Lijten:
Separating concerns even better with events
March 09, 2015 @ 09:17:26

Freek Lijten has a new post to his site today today talking about a concept of good OOP design, separation of concerns, and how the use of events can help make it "even better". In it he converts some code from a decently structure state into something even driven, splitting out the work from the handling code.

At PHP Benelux 2015 I witnessed a talk by Matias Noback about events. It was a great talk so if you have chance to see it yourself somewhere, do so! In a very tiny nutshell he took us from what most would consider already decent code to better code. Lets start with "decent".

His "decent" code handles user management, executing certain business rules once the user is successfully registered. In the first version of is code, the User is passed into the "saveUser" function and several actions are performed (is the username in use? can they be saved?) including the sending of the email as requested once a user registers. This code is primarily procedural, all in one place and Freek updates it using events to make it a bit more well-contained. He extracts the piece sending the email and translates that into an event. This is then pushed into a set of handlers and executed allowing for greater flexibility if additional actions are needed in the future.

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Link: http://www.freeklijten.nl/home/2015/03/09/Separating-concerns-even-better-with-events

Stefan Koopmanschap:
On Code Reviews
March 06, 2015 @ 09:11:40

Stefan Koopmanschap has a new post today talking about code reviews and introducing the concept for those not familiar with what they are or their usefulness.

Code reviewing is exactly what it sounds like: It is reviewing code written by another developer. There are different ways of doing this, but in the end it all comes down to having at least one other set of eyes checking any code written before it is released. There's many reasons for doing code reviews. It can be to prevent security issues, to ensure correct performance of your application, to prevent bugs but eventually it all comes down to the more generic term of ensuring the quality of your application.

He goes on to talk about some of the most common ways to do code reviews, either in something a simple as a pull request out to face-to-face discussions as the code is being introduced. He includes some hints on preparing for the review, steps to perform the review, dealing constructively with the comments made and finally the approval. He talks about who should do the reviewing and how they can still be useful even if you work alone or with a QA department.

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Link: http://leftontheweb.com/blog/2015/03/06/Code_Reviews/

Jani Hartikainen:
What's the difference between Unit Testing, TDD and BDD?
March 02, 2015 @ 09:16:28

On his site today Jani Hartikainen has a new post helping to demystify some potential confusion around unit testing, test-driven development and behavior-driven development. He's talking about them in the context of Javascript in this case, but the fundamentals transfer to just about any other language, including PHP.

When you're just getting started with automating your JavaScript testing, there's a lot of questions. You'll probably see people talk about unit testing, TDD or Test-Driven Development, and BDD or Behavior-Driven Development. But which one of them is the best approach? Can you use all of them? I've talked to a number of JavaScript developers, and there seems to be some confusion about all this. So, let's take a look at Unit testing, TDD and BDD, and fix some of the common misconceptions about them out there.

For each he provides an overview of this basic concepts and a bit of sample code showing it in action. For TDD (test-driven development) there's not really a way to show it specifically in code as it's more of a practice. Instead he gives a "checklist" to follow when practicing it.

Unit Testing gives you the what. Test-Driven Development gives you the when. Behavior Driven-Development gives you the how. Although you can use each individually, you should combine them for best results as they complement each other very nicely.
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bdd unittest tdd testdrive behaviordriven development introduction

Link: http://codeutopia.net/blog/2015/03/01/unit-testing-tdd-and-bdd/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Exploring the Cache API in Drupal 8
February 26, 2015 @ 11:41:45

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a new tutorial (by Daniel Sipos) talking about the Drupal 8 cache and showing how to use it in an example, caching the latest post data pulled from the Drupal content.

Drupal 8 comes with many improvements over its predecessor we have grown to both love and hate. Next to prominent systems such as Views in core, configuration management or a useful translation service, there are also less known changes but that are equally important to know and use. One such improvement has been the cache API that solves many performance problems we have in Drupal 7.

They start with a basic introduction to the new cache handing and how the caches are separated out into different "bins" rather than all stored in one place. He includes sample code showing how to: save data to the cache, getting information back out and invalidating the cache to be handled by garbage collection. He also covers the cache tags, a feature that allows you to "tag" items across multiple caches and remove/invalidate them all at the same time. He wraps up the post getting into the more practical example showing the caching at work in a controller caching the contents of the posts to the Drupal site.

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drupal cache drupal8 tutorial introduction improvement

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/exploring-cache-api-drupal-8/

Benjamin Eberlei:
Integrate Symfony and Webpack
February 26, 2015 @ 10:21:40

In his latest entry Benjamin Eberlei shows how he integrated Symfony and Webpack, a tool that makes it simpler to package up multiple assets (like Javascript or CSS files) and reduce them down to combined files, reducing the overhead on page loads.

Asset Management in Symfony2 is handled with the PHP based library Assetic by default, however I have never really connected to this library and at least for me it usually wastes more time than it saves. [...] While researching about React.JS I came across a tool called Webpack which you could compare to Symfony's Assetic. It is primarily focussing on bundling Javascript modules, but you can also ship CSS assets with it.

He talks about some of the main benefits to using the Webpack tool including a built-in web server to serve up the assets and a "hot reload" plugin that refreshes when assets change. He then gets into a more practical example, showing how the tool works with a typical asset structure in a Symfony application. He shows how it uses the internal server to prevent the need for a complete rebuild each time. He also shows how to install and configure it through Symfony and loading the Javascript file in your Twig template. Finally he shows how to run a build, the resulting output and the integration he mentioned with React.js.

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symfony asset webpack tool tutorial introduction configuration install

Link: http://www.whitewashing.de/2015/02/26/integrate_symfony_and_webpack.html


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