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EngineYard Blog:
What to Expect When You're Expecting PHP 7, Part 1
April 03, 2015 @ 08:28:36

Davey Shafik has posted the first part of a new series about PHP 7 on the Engine Yard blog today - What to Expect When You're Expecting: PHP 7.

As many of you are probably aware, the RFC I mentioned in my PHP 5.0.0 timeline passed with PHP 7 being the agreed upon name for the next major version of PHP. Regardless of your feelings on this topic, PHP 7 is a thing, and it's coming this year! With the RFC for the PHP 7.0 Timeline passing almost unanimously (32 to 2), we have now entered into feature freeze, and we'll see the first release candidate (RC) appearing in mid June. But what does this mean for you?

He gets into some of the details of what you can expect to see in this next major release including:

  • Inconsistency Fixes
  • Performance
  • Backwards Incompatible Changes
  • Scalar Type Hints & Return Types
  • Combined Comparison Operator (spaceship)

He ends the post hinting at other things to come in part two of the series including six other big features you need to know about to upgrade to PHP 7.

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php7 series part1 expecting features changes release

Link: https://blog.engineyard.com/2015/what-to-expect-php-7

Scotch.io:
Build a Time Tracker with Laravel 5 and AngularJS - Part 1
March 27, 2015 @ 08:49:57

On the Scotch.io site there's a new tutorial showing you how to build a time tracking application with a combination of Laravel and AngularJS. This is the first part of a new series and focuses on the basic principles and getting some of the first parts of the application up and running.

Laravel and AngularJS work great together, but it can be a little tricky to get going at first, especially if you are new to the frameworks. In a previous article, Chris showed you how to make a Single Page Comment App with Laravel and Angular. This tutorial will again bring the two frameworks together as we build out a simple time tracking application.

We'll be going into a lot of detail in this tutorial, so to make things manageable it has been broken into two parts. The first part will focus on getting the front-end setup with AngularJS and the second part on getting the backend setup with Laravel 5.

He starts with an overall look at the application and what functionality it will have. From there he walks you through:

  • Setting up the folder structure
  • Installing dependencies
  • Creating Javascript files
  • Setting up the view
  • Adding extra styling
  • Fetching the time data

He makes use of the Moment.js library to perform some of the time calculations for the difference and total time elapsed. He ends the post by tying up some loose ends with the controller and updating the view with the new calculated time values.

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tutorial laravel angularjs time tracker application series part1

Link: https://scotch.io/tutorials/build-a-time-tracker-with-laravel-5-and-angularjs-part-1

Hailoapp.com:
A Journey into Microservices
March 11, 2015 @ 11:23:34

On the Hailo.com blog Matt Heath has posted a series of articles about their transition from a "monolith" codebase out into a set of microservices for the Hallo app system.

Hailo, like many startups, started small; small enough that our offices were below deck on a boat in central London - the HMS President. Working on a boat as a small focused team, we built out our original apps and APIs using tried and tested technologies, including Java, PHP, MySQL and Redis, all running on Amazon's EC2 platform. [...] After we launched in London, and then Dublin, we expanded from one continent to two, and then three; launching first in North America, and then in Asia. This posed a number of challenges-the main one being locality of customer data.

They describe this customer data problem in a bit more detail with the issue mostly revolving around the geolocation of the user and their information. They talk about "going global" and the steps they took to make the move. In the three parts of the series, they explain the changes they made and why they were effective for their application:

They end the series with some links to other resources that help compliment the subjects mentioned and link to slides from a presentation around the same topic.

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microservice journey series part1 part2 part3 introduction architecture api halloapp

Link: https://sudo.hailoapp.com/services/2015/03/09/journey-into-a-microservice-world-part-1/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Exploring the Webiny Framework The StdLib Component
March 09, 2015 @ 11:57:47

In this first post in a new series on SitePoint's PHP blog Bruno Skvorc about the Webiny framework and why they chose to "reinvent the wheel" in a lot of their code. In this first post Bruno focuses in on the StdLib component.

We all know there's no shortage of frameworks in the PHP ecosystem, so it surprised me quite a bit to see another pop up rather recently. The framework is called Webiny, and, while packed to the brim with wheel reinventions they deem necessary, there are some genuinely interesting components in there that warrant taking a look. In this introductory post, we won't be focusing on the framework as a whole, but on the most basic of its components - the StdLib.

The StdLib component is responsible for base level functionality including making using scalar variables (as opposed to objects) simpler. It makes use of traits to include its functionality across the board rather than through direct inheritance. He lists some of the features included in the component, various traits for reuse, like the "factory loader" and validator traits. He includes descriptions and code examples of several others as well, showing them in use and some of their limitations too.

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webiny framework series stdlib component part1

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/exploring-webiny-framework-stdlib-component/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Popular Photos, Filters and User Profiles with the 500px API
March 05, 2015 @ 11:26:50

The SitePoint PHP blog has started off a new series this morning to help you create a custom Laravel application based on the 500px photo community site. In this first part of the series they help you get the application up and running and connected to the 500px API.

500px is a photo community for discovering, sharing, buying and selling inspiring photography. In this article we are going to explore their API and build a small showcase app. Let's get started.

You'll need to have Laravel set up and working to get started on the tutorial, but they help you get the other libraries installed and configured (like Guzzle). They start with getting a list of the most popular photos from the API, connecting it to your account via an OAuth token. A base route is created and connected to a controller/action with a view to render each of the photos in their own divs. They then add in a bit of Javascript to create a "Load More" button that makes another call, with pagination, to pull in more photo details. Finally they show you how to create the user profile page, grabbing user information and related photos and rendering them out to a page.

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500px tutorial series part1 laravel api oauth photos filters profiles

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/popular-photos-filters-user-profiles-500px-api/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Discover Graph Databases with Neo4j and PHP
February 16, 2015 @ 11:49:51

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post today about combining PHP and Neo4j, a popular graph database, and create a simple application.

In this post, we'll be learning about Neo4j, the leading graph database, and ways to use it with PHP. In a followup post, we'll be building a proper graph application powered by Silex. [...] For the newcomers, here is a short introduction to graph databases and Neo4j, apart from the theoretical glance we threw at it last year.

For those not familiar with some of the concepts behind graph databases, they start with a quick introduction. They illustrate the concept of relationships with a few helpful images. They also cover the basics of Cypher, the language used in Neo4j database queries. They then show how to get the Neoxygen components installed to talk with the Neo4j database (via an HTTP API) and configuring a basic connection. The remainder of the post shows how to insert data into the database, including relationships, and pulling that information back out via PHP.

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graph database neo4j tutorial introduction neoxygen series part1

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/discover-graph-databases-neo4j-php/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introducing eBay's Trading API - Setting Up
January 06, 2015 @ 12:58:43

The SitePoint PHP blog they've posted the first part of a new series about using the eBay API as a part of a product management application. In part one they start by getting things set up on the eBay trading API and creating the database you'll need for the rest of the series.

In this tutorial series, I'll walk you through Ebay's Trading API. The Trading API allows you to build applications that can be used for selling in Ebay. Here are some examples of things you can do with the API: retrieve store information, update store preferences, add products to a specific eBay store, end product listings, update product price and retrieve product information. In this tutorial, we'll be creating an app that allows users to create a product on eBay through the use of the API.

They start by helping you register an application on the eBay developer site and configure the settings to match your needs. They link to some of the tools you can use during your development and some of the headers/content you'll need to set to make your requests. The tutorial wraps up with the SQL needed to create the database backend for your store's settings, products, listings and some sample data to insert.

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ebay trading api tutorial series part1 product management

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introducing-ebays-trading-api-setting/

NetTuts.com:
Integrate Bitcoin Payment Gateway Into OpenCart Part 1
December 17, 2014 @ 10:46:50

On the NetTuts.com site today they've posted the first part of a series showing the integration of the BitPay bitcoin payment service into an OpenCart instance. In this first part they focus on getting some of the initial setup and administration handling set up.

In this series, we are going to look at building a Bitcoin payment system into our installation of OpenCart. Before we get started, I recommend that you practice the basic OpenCart module development if you are not familiar with how to build your own modules. Once done, you should have enough knowledge to continue with developing more advanced modules. In this series, that's exactly what we aim to do.

They start by having you download the BitPay API library and dropping it into the root directory of your OpenCart installation. Next they show you how to create an "Admin" controller with the data you'll need to pass into the view including data pulled from a model. They also create the admin view showing the current orders using bitcoin as payment, their status and options to change the speed of the API requests, status and toggling test mode on and off. Finally they include the code to save the results of the admin form submission and a bit of validation around user permissions and API key validity.

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opencart payment integration bitpay bitcoin series part1

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/integrate-bitcoin-payment-gateway-into-opencart-part-1--cms-22328

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Installing and Securing Jenkins
December 01, 2014 @ 13:09:43

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the first part of a new series of articles showing you how to use (and secure) Jenkins, the popular continuous integration tool, to bring more quality to your PHP-based applications.

Earlier this year, I wrote an article about PHP-CI, which you can use as a continuous integration tool for your PHP projects. Within this article I indicated I still liked Jenkins the most as a CI tool. Time to dive into Jenkins and see how we can set this up for our PHP project.

In this first part of the series helps you get Jenkins installed via a package and configure it on the server. He then gets into the steps to secure the installation: configuring users, turning off signups and the type of security to set up (they choose matrix-based). He wraps up the article with a look at installing some useful plugins and using a template to use as a base for setting up your projects.

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series part1 jenkins qualityassurance qa install security tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/installing-securing-jenkins/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Practical OOP Building a Quiz App - Bootstrapping
November 14, 2014 @ 13:44:09

The SitePoint PHP blog has kicked off a new series of posts today with the first tutorial about building an application with OOP and the Slim framework. In this starting article they focus in on bootstrapping the application and introducing some of the basics behind MVC and OOP.

At a certain point of my development as a PHP programmer, I was building MVC applications by-the-book, without understanding the ins-and-outs. I did what I was told: fat model, thin controller. Don't put logic in your views. What I didn't understand was how to create a cohesive application structure that allowed me to express my business ideas as maintainable code, nor did I understand how to really separate my concerns into tight layers without leaking low-level logic into higher layers. I'd heard about SOLID principles, but applying them to a web app was a mystery. In this series, we'll build a quiz application using these concepts. We'll separate the application into layers, allowing us to substitute components: for example, it'll be a breeze to switch from MongoDB to MySQL, or from a web interface to a command-line interface.

They start off with a bit about why "MVC is not enough" and how they'll be applying domain modeling as a part of the application. There's also a brief mention of the concept of a service layer and how it will fit into the overall structure. Then it's on to the code: getting Slim installed (via Composer) and starting in on the interface/service classes for the Quiz. They walk you through entity creation for the Quiz and Question instances and a mapper to tie them together.

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practical oop tutorial series part1 bootstrap slimframework solid mvc

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/practical-oop-building-quiz-app-bootstrapping/


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