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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building an Image Gallery Blog with Symfony Flex (Parts 1 & 2)
Jun 21, 2018 @ 11:48:56

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've kicked off a series by Zoran Antolovic walking through the creation of a blog application using the latest from the Symfony project - Symfony Flex.

Our journey towards a stable, robust, high-performance web app will start with the simple but functional application — the so-called minimum viable product (MVP). We’ll populate the database with random content, do some benchmarks and improve performance incrementally. Every article in this series will be a checkpoint on our journey!

This article will cover the basics of setting up the project and organizing files for our Symfony Flex project. I’ll also show you some tips, tricks and helper scripts I’m using for speeding up the development.

So far they've posted the first two articles of the series:

  • Part one explaining some of the basics of Flex and getting the application set up (including some sample fixture data)
  • Part two showing how to populate the application with more realistic data, run some basic performance tests and create a first unit test

There's much more to come in the series including the creation of file (image) upload handling, user registration and login and the creation of image galleries from uploads.

tagged: image gallery blog tutorial symfonyflex symfony flex part1 part2

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/building-image-gallery-blog-symfony-flex-setup/

Symfony Blog:
New in Symfony 4.1: Misc. improvements (Parts 1-4)
May 30, 2018 @ 13:18:05

On the Symfony project blog they've posted a series of articles covering some miscellaneous improvements made for the v4.1 release of the framework.

During the past months we've published almost 40 blog posts about the main new features of Symfony 4.1. In this article you'll find some of the other small but nice new features.

Here's the list of the posts and some of the things covered in each:

  • Part 1: CSRF without forms, visibility change in progress bar component, showing dotenv files in the profiler
  • Part 2: command to delete cache pool items, allowing custom functions in "allow_if" expressions, addition of "dd" debug helper
  • Part 3: add/remove LDAP attributes efficiently, keeping the query string after redirect, hasser accessors in PropertyInfo
  • Part 4: adding anonymous services in PHP DSL, support for extracting type from constructor, configurable PHP error log level

Check out each post for a brief summary of each change and example code/configuration showing how to make use of it.

tagged: symfony improvement v41 series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://symfony.com/blog/new-in-symfony-4-1-misc-improvements-part-1

Matt Sparks:
Building a PHP Framework Series (Parts 1-4)
May 16, 2018 @ 12:50:42

On this site Matt Sparks has posted the first few parts of a series covering the creation of a custom framework. Why? Well, as he explains in part one of the series:

So with all of that being said, it begs the question: why on Earth would you want to do this?

The extremely short answer: I want to. The less short answer: A PHP framework encompasses many of the areas I want to learn more about.

The first four posts of the series are already on his site (with more to come):

Matt does a great job of laying out some of the fundamentals behind frameworks including structure, design patterns, and commonalities between frameworks. You can follow along with his progress on the project on the AnalyzePHP GitHub repositories.

tagged: build framework tutorial series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://developmentmatt.com/building-a-php-framework-part-4-the-foundation/

Delicious Brains:
WordPress Deployment Part 1: Preparing WordPress
May 09, 2018 @ 11:05:12

The Delicious Brains blog has kicked off a new series of posts walking you through the deployment of a WordPress site with automated (and repeatable) deployments.

Welcome to the first post in a workflow series on deploying WordPress. In this series, we’re going to look at how you can set up automated deployments for your WordPress site in a range of different ways.

They start off by answering the question of "why" for automated deployments. They make the point that automated deployments can help reduce the potential for human error, increase the reliability of the deployments and have many more benefits. Next they start in on the preparation work, helping you get several prerequisites set up before getting to the deployment process:

  • Setting up the site on an accessible Git repository and having plugins/dependencies managed by Composer
  • Deploying configuration files
  • Disable FTP Access & File Editing
  • Disable Auto Updates

The post also includes a section covering the deployment of the database for your application and any other media you might have related to it (images, files, etc).

tagged: wordpress deployment series part1 preparation

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/wordpress-deployment-workflow-preparing/

Christoph Rumpel:
Build a newsletter chatbot in PHP (Part 1 & 2)
Mar 02, 2018 @ 09:56:21

On his site has posted parts one and two of a series showing how to build a chatbot that can help provide more direct interaction with your users via a "newsletter" feature.

Since the beginning of the year, I am working on a new project of mine. It's a book called Build Chatbots with PHP. Follow the link to find out what it is about and who it is for.

More interesting to us is the newsletter, to which you can subscribe on the book's website. About once or twice a month I will send out an email with news on the development of the book.

He starts part one by outlining the general plan and functionality for the bot and its integration with Facebook. The tutorial then walks through the installation and configuration of the BotMan Studio project. It also shows the setup of the application on the Facebook service and how to connect it to the BotMan application. He walks through the setup of a few commands to welcome the user and start the conversation. Part two continues the process showing how to store the user and subscription information and how to send the newsletter notifications. He also makes some suggestions of extra functionality you might want to add like a typing indicator, a "fallback" for unknown commands.

tagged: introduction part2 part1 series tutorial chatbot newsletter facebook

Link: https://christoph-rumpel.com/2018/02/build-a-newsletter-chatbot-in-php-part-1

Joe Ferguson:
Laravel Homestead – The missing manual part 1 – Site Parameters
Feb 26, 2018 @ 10:09:26

On his site Joe Ferguson (maintainer of the Laravel Homestead project) has posted the first part of a "missing manual" series for Homestead. In this first part he covers the use of site parameters.

In the early days of Homestead there used to be a “params” option at the top level of your Homestead.yaml file. These parameters would be copied into the environment for the virtual machine just like you would set environment variables on your production systems. Laravel ultimately moved to using “.env” files and this feature was removed from Homestead.

Some users pushed back and still wanted to be able to easily push parameters to the individual site’s configuration file (virtual host file) so a new feature was implemented where you could add a “params” key to your Homestead.yaml site definition and they would be copied into the virtual host configuration file.

Joe then shows how to add the params section back into the Homestead.yaml file and get the settings loaded into the Homestead instance (involves destroying the Vagrant box and restoring it).

tagged: homestead manual part1 series site parameters tutorial

Link: https://www.joeferguson.me/laravel-homestead-the-missing-manual-part-1-site-parameters/

Michael Dyrynda:
Uploading files to Amazon S3 from the browser - Part One
Nov 06, 2017 @ 11:58:34

Michael Dyrynda has a tutorial posted to his site starting off a new series showing how to create the functionality in your application to upload files to Amazon S3 from the browser. The tutorial is designed for those that don't already have something in their framework that allows for this upload handling.

I recently took on a freelance project that involved having to upload media files. This is a trivially simple task to accomplish if you're using something like Laravel, using out-of-the-box support for S3 storage.

In this particular case, however, I was dealing with files potentially multiple gigabytes in size. Although a simpler to implement, I didn't want to have to have users of the site upload the file to my application - and thus server - before having my server re-upload the file to S3.

In his case, he needed something that would allow for the upload of very large files without having to pass it through the backend server to get there. He starts by walking you through the setup on the S3 side, creating an IAM policy for the upload and a form that points to the instance. The form includes a "key" value that contains the filename for the end result. He also shows some of the other options that can be included like the policy to use a redirect location and a signature to verify the upload. He then shows the code required to make it work, creating an upload route and a main form page that generates the signature and policy information for the form based on configuration options.

tagged: amazon s3 upload tutorial part1 series direct post

Link: https://dyrynda.com.au/blog/uploading-files-to-amazon-s3-from-the-browser-part-one

Asmir Mustafic:
Modular Application Architecture - Intro
Nov 02, 2017 @ 13:56:23

Asmir Mustafic has kicked off a new series on his site with an introduction to modular application architectures. In the series he will work through the creation and management of modular applications as inspired by a session he attended in 2011.

When developing a software, one of the most common steps is taking care that the resulting application is extensible and modular.

Let's suppose we have our application or library. If we see it from outside, often it looks as a single thing. [...] As the application grows we can continue adding components... but this comes with a price. Components often knows too much of our application and there is a delicate equilibrium of dependencies between them and our application. When not handled carefully, a small change in one component might require changes in many other.

As a rule of thumb, I personally try to follow as much as possible the Acyclic dependencies principle Another way to allow extensibility but keeping the application "clean" is to introduce modules.

He starts by talking about modules and the major part they'll play in the overall architecture. He explains why modules are so key to the overall structure and what kind of advantages they bring along with their use. He spends the remainder of the post looking at some of the main challenges they'll face including the file/directory structure definitions, module registration methods and the configuration of each of the modules.

tagged: modular application architecture introduction tutorial series part1

Link: https://www.goetas.com/blog/modular-application-architecture-intro/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Game Development with React and PHP: How Compatible Are They?
Sep 15, 2017 @ 12:43:52

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial from Christopher Pitt that tries to answer the question wondering if React and PHP are compatible for game development.

“I’d like to make a multiplayer, economy-based game. Something like Stardew Valley, but with none of the befriending aspects and a player-based economy.”

I started thinking about this the moment I decided to try and build a game using PHP and React. The trouble is, I knew nothing about the dynamics of multiplayer games, or how to think about and implement player-based economies. I wasn’t even sure I knew enough about React to justify using it.

I once watched a talk by dead_lugosi, where she described building a medieval game in PHP. Margaret inspired me, and that talk was one of the things that led to me writing <a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/1484224922>a book about JS game development. I became determined to write about my experience. Perhaps others could learn from my mistakes in this case, too.

With the foundation laid, he starts in on the setup of the backend for the game: a PHP server running a server compatible with multiple websocket (React) requests. He chose Aerys for the HTTP and websocket functionality and includes the code to create the server and the packages he required. He shares some of the code to create the server and a "Hello world" endpoint the frontend will use. He then moves over to the frontend side of things, showing the packages he installed via NPM and the Laravel Mix configuration to use Webpack to bundle up the files required. He then walks through the integration of the front and back end code including the connection of the websockets.

For those that want to see the end result all together he has posted it to GitHub in a complete form for this part of the series.

tagged: react tutorial reactphp game development part1 series websocket

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/game-development-with-reactjs-and-php-how-compatible-are-they/

James Wade:
PHP CI with Jenkins and Docker (Part 1)
Sep 11, 2017 @ 09:06:28

On his site James Wade has posted the first part of a tutorial showing you how to get your PHP application set up for continuous integration with Jenkins and Docker. In this part of the series he focuses on the setup of the technology involved, linking to every tool you'll need.

I’ve been developing in PHP now for longer than I haven’t. Going from using PHP as a hammer to a nail, using it to allow forms to send emails, to operating popular open source projects, to leading a team of developers in a business enterprise. One key advice I learned from running an open source project on the SourceForge platform was “release early, release often”.

This is a mantra that I’ve always tried to stick to and its always brought me good results. As I get into more and more complex projects, both in code structure and politically, I find myself turning to tools to solve problems. One of those tools is Continuous Integration.

He talks about coding styles and IDE automation that can help make you code better and cleaner but points out that there's more to be done than just that. He briefly covers the idea behind continuous integration and why he chose Jenkins for his environment. He then gets into the setup process, showing how to get tools like PHPUnit, phploc, phpmd and phpcpd installed. He includes the dockerfile to set up this environment and the bash script that handles the setup process. He finishes the post with a brief look at the automation that happens thanks to the Jenkinsfile configuration and what's coming in part two of the series.

tagged: continuous integration jenkins docker series part1 tutorial

Link: http://wade.be/development/2017/09/03/php-ci.html