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Thijs Feryn:
The Drupal 8 origin story with Larry Garfield
Nov 23, 2015 @ 12:28:57

Thijs Feryn has posted the latest episode in his series of video interviews with members of the PHP community he's caught up with at conferences. In his latest show he talks with Larry Garfield, one of the more well-known members in the Drupal community about the latest milestone in Drupal, the release of Drupal 8.

Today, November 19th 2015, marks the release date of Drupal 8. To celebrate this release, I decided to publish my interview with Larry Garfield today.

Larry is a key member of the Drupal community and a core contributor to the project. Throughout the conversation, Larry tells us the origin story of Drupal 8 and how the technical challenges lead to the adoption of technology from the broader PHP community such as Composer, Twig and a set of Symfony Components.

I hope you like the interview, it gives a nice behind the scenes look at the history of Drupal 8 and how Drupal reached out to the PHP community to create a more modern code base.

You can watch the video either through the in-page video player or directly on YouTube. You can also check out his previous interviews in this archive section on his site.

tagged: thijsferyn interview larrygarfield drupal drupal8 community

Link: http://blog.feryn.eu/2015/11/19/the-drupal-8-origin-story-with-larry-garfield/

Thijs Feryn:
Interviewing Christian Wenz, talking about PHP, .NET & Las Vegas
Oct 28, 2015 @ 12:14:40

Thijs Feryn has posted his latest interview video he recoded while at the Zendcon conference in Las Vegas recently. In this new episode he talks with Christian Wenz about PHP, .NET and Las Vegas in general.

Last week I was in Las Vegas for Zendcon. I had the pleasure of catching up with my buddy Christian Wenz.

Christian lives in Munich and he co-owns Arrabiata Solutions. He’s also a consultant and focuses mainly on the web in general. The thing with Christian is that he is both a Microsoft MVP and an established PHP community member.In the interview we talk about the difference between PHP & .NET for web projects and also about both communities.

The second part of the interview is about Las Vegas. Sin City is a place you can love and hate at the same time. We talk about hotels, shows and more.

You can catch this latest episode either through the in-page video player or just the audio over on Soundcloud. If you enjoy the interview, be sure to check out the others he's done so far with other members of the PHP (and other) community.

tagged: thijsferyn interview christianwenz dotnet drupal drupalcon video

Link: http://blog.feryn.eu/2015/10/26/interviewing-christian-wenz-talking-about-php-net-las-vegas/

Exporting Drupal Nodes with PHP and Drush
Oct 06, 2015 @ 11:09:11

The php[architect] site has posted a tutorial showing you how to export Drupal nodes with Drush and a bit of regular PHP. Drush is a command line tool that makes working with Drupal outside of the interface simpler and easier to automate.

Drupal 8 development has shown that PHP itself, and the wider PHP community, already provides ways to solve common tasks. In this post, I’ll show you some core PHP functionality that you may not be aware of; pulling in packages and libraries via Composer is a topic for another day.

The tutorial walks through a more real-world situation of needing to export a CSV file that shows a list of nodes added to the site after a specific date. He points out some of the benefits of doing it the Drush way and starts in on the code/configuration you need to set the system up. He shows how to create the Drush command itself and update it with a method to export the newest nodes (after validating the date provided). He makes use of a SplFileObject to output the results from the EntityFieldQuery query out into to the CSV file. He makes use of PHP's generators functionality to only fetch the records a few at a time. Finally he includes the command to execute the export, defining the date to query the node set and how to push that output to a file.

tagged: export drupal node drush commmandline csv output query generator

Link: https://www.phparch.com/2015/10/exporting-drupal-nodes-with-php-and-drush/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Building Custom cTools Plugins in Drupal 7
Oct 05, 2015 @ 12:46:27

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial posted showing you how to build custom cTools in Drupal that will integrate with the widely used cTools tool set.

cTools is one of those critical Drupal 7 modules many others depend on. It provides a lot of APIs and functionality that makes life easier when developing modules. Views and Panels are just two examples of such powerhouses that depend on it. [...] In this article, we are going to take a look at cTools plugins, especially how we can create our very own. After a brief introduction, we will immediately go hands on with a custom module that will use the cTools plugins to make defining Drupal blocks nicer (more in tune to how we define them in Drupal 8).

He starts by briefly introducing the cTools functionality and different types of plugins included in common use. He then moves on to the "block_plugin" handling and the custom functionality you'll be walked through - a plugin encapsulating a block and its related logic. He starts by defining the plugin type with a function the cTools can locate and the code it should contain. From there the code needed to turn a block plugin into a "Drupal block" is added including a prefix to "namespace" them out. Finally the view handling is implemented and a helper function is created to load the plugin. He then shows how to define one of the block plugins complete with a title, markup and type.

tagged: custom ctool plugins drupal block tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-custom-ctools-plugins-in-drupal-7/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Build Multi-step Forms in Drupal 8
Jul 07, 2015 @ 12:25:06

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post for the Drupal users out there showing you how to create multi-step forms in your application.

In this article, we are going to look at building a multistep form in Drupal 8. For brevity, the form will have only two steps in the shape of two completely separate forms. To persist values across these steps, we will use functionality provided by Drupal’s core for storing temporary and private data across multiple requests. In Drupal 7, a similar approach can be achieved using the cTools object cache. Alternatively, there is the option of persisting data through the $form_state array as illustrated in this tutorial.

They start by setting out what the end result will be - a simple two-page form with two fields each, allowing for navigation back and forth between the pages. They start with a base class defining requirements needed for both pages and setting up the necessary form structure. They walk through each part of this base class, explaining the functionality going along. With that in place they extend it with a "MultistepOneForm" and "MultistepTwoForm" classes extending the base and defining two fields on each.

tagged: tutorial drupal drupal8 multistep form

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-build-multi-step-forms-in-drupal-8/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Multiple Editors per Node in Drupal 7
Jun 11, 2015 @ 09:57:49

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new Drupal tutorial about allowing multiple editors to work on the same node of content.

have encountered a practical use case where the default configuration options are not enough. Namely, if you need to have multiple users with access to edit a particular node of a given type but without them necessarily having access to edit others of the same type. In other words, the next great article should be editable by Laura and Glenn but not by their colleagues. However, out of the box, users of a particular role can be masters either of their own content or of all content of a certain type. So this is not immediately possible. In this article I am going to show you my solution to this problem in the form of a simple custom module called editor_list.

He walks you through the process, first creating the .info file needed to define the module and the changes needed for the .module file. He creates a few helper functions to get the editor listing for a node and its matching access rules. With the module created he then gets into building the fields, again making helper methods to get the editors for the fields. Finally he "tidies up" and adds an "Authored on" section to the node editor with a helper function to receive and handle the results of this field when the form is submitted.

tagged: multiple editor drupal node field tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/multiple-editors-per-node-drupal-7/

HHVM Blog:
Lockdown Results and HHVM Performance
Jun 10, 2015 @ 09:02:59

The HHVM blog has a new post today sharing the results of their first open source lockdown. During this time they worked to improve not only HHVM itself but how well it supports other open source projects using it as a platform.

The HHVM team has concluded its first ever open source performance lockdown, and we’re very excited to share the results with you. During our two week lockdown, we’ve made strides optimizing builtin functions, dynamic properties, string concatenation, and the file cache. In addition to improving HHVM, we also looked for places in the open source frameworks where we could contribute patches that would benefit all engines. Our efforts centered around maximizing requests per second (RPS) with WordPress, Drupal 7, and MediaWiki, using our oss-performance benchmarking tool.

They share some of the benchmark improvements made by the updates during the session including performance boosts for WordPress & MediaWiki. They also talk about the community involvement during the event and updates made to their own tooling too. The post then spends some time talking about their methodology on development and testing during the lockdown and how the results compare pre- and post-lockdown. The remainder of the post looks at some more specific issues and covers a few technical notes about software used and how the results were reported.

tagged: hhvm lockdown opensource benchmark improvement wordpress drupal mediawiki results

Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/9293/lockdown-results-and-hhvm-performance

Kinsta Blog:
HHVM vs PHP 7 – The Competition Gets Closer!
May 26, 2015 @ 10:19:02

In this new post to thier blog Kinsta shares benchmark results comparing PHP 7 to HHVM, both in their own experience and some shared from other companies too.

A few years ago, engineers at Facebook went on a swashbuckling mission to rebuild the foundation of the world’s most populated social network struggling to sustain acceptable performance levels. PHP was all the rage a decade ago when Facebook was gaining steam and pursuing a global target audience.

As they put it the "competition is getting closer" and the performance gap between the two is growing smaller and smaller. They talk some about the performance improvements and new features that are being worked into PHP 7 and some speculations around a Just-In-Time engine and asynchronous programming features. Then comes the benchmarks. They provide the specifications of the machine they tested on and the results of tests runs of WordPress and Drupal (based on requests per second). The rest of the article talks about two stories from other companies using HHVM, Etsy and WikiMedia, and some of the lessons that have been learned along the way.

tagged: hhvm php7 performance benchmarks mediawiki etsy wordpress drupal

Link: https://kinsta.com/blog/hhvm-vs-php-7/

Mikkel Høgh:
Drupal is still a gated community
May 25, 2015 @ 10:16:42

In a recent post to his site Mikkel Høgh makes the suggestion that Drupal is still a gated community, mostly as it relates to the process around the "Project Applications" process.

One of the things the Drupal community prides itself on, is how open the community is. And that is generally true, but there's one exception. And that is the Kafkaesque horror-show we subject any newcomers that would like to publish their code on Drupal.org to. It goes by the name of “Project Applications“. I know several people who've hit this wall when trying to contribute code. It's not uncommon to wait several months to get someone to review your code. And when it does happen, people are often rejected for tiny code style issues, like not ending their comments with a period or similar.

He talks about other factors involving reviews and delays that can also cause authors to abandon their work and feel "unwelcome and unappreciated". He mentions the "review bonus" system and how it's used to encourage participation (or "more hoops" as he puts it) from other authors. He notes that this situation mostly relates to those new to the tool and community and suggests that it just doesn't work (and really is unnecessary). He ends the post with a call to "end the madness" and move to a standardized role that would allow developers to publish without pushing people away and making them feel unwelcome.

tagged: opinion drupal walledgarden project applications review delay contribution

Link: http://mikkel.hoegh.org/2015/05/14/drupal-is-still-a-gated-community/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Integrate Elasticsearch with Silex
Apr 13, 2015 @ 08:38:55

The SitePoint PHP blog has continued their look at integrating Elasticsearch into a simple Silex-based PHP application. In this latest part of the series (part two) they move away from the full Drupal example in part one and go a bit more simple and create a basic site to show a node's detail (content and title).

In the previous article I started exploring the integration between Drupal 7 and the Elasticsearch engine. The goal was to see how we can combine these open source technologies to achieve a high performance application that uses the best of both worlds. [...] We’ll now create a small Silex application that reads data straight from Elasticsearch and returns it to the user.

Using Silex and the same Elasticsearch PHP SDK they create this simple site. The tutorial walks you through the installation of both tools, the configuration of the Elasticsearch client and creating the controllers to respond to the view requests. They also show how to use the Twig templating engine to render the results as a simple page containing the node title, any images attached to it and the body content. The tutorial ends with a brief mention of how this same data could also be rendered as JSON output with a different view handler.

tagged: silex tutorial elasticsearch simple twig template json node drupal

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/integrate-elasticsearch-silex/