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Andrew Embler:
Q&A: Using Composer in a concrete5 Package
Aug 21, 2015 @ 11:30:46

Andrew Embler has posted a guide to his site showing you how to use Composer with concrete5 to integrate third party libraries quickly and easily. concrete5 is an open source content management system under the MIT license and is flexible and easy to extend.

Let's say I'm creating a statistics package and I want to use LavaCharts in it. For those who don't know, LavaCharts is a PHP library that abstracts Google's JavaScript Chart API to PHP. Instead of writing JavaScript, you build your charts with object-oriented PHP. It's nice. LavaCharts is available through Composer, so I'll include it that way.

He uses this particular package as an example, showing you how to create the composer.json file to include the LavaCharts library and run Composer to install it. He then shows the integration of the package with the concrete5 CMS instance, including the Composer autoloader in the "on start" handling. From there it's just a matter of referencing the library via its namespace and using it to populate and generate the resulting chart.

tagged: composer lavacharts tutorial integration library package concrete5 cms

Link: http://andrewembler.com/2015/08/q-using-composer-concrete5-package/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Record Retrieval and Pagination in Bolt CMS
Jun 02, 2015 @ 12:29:59

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted showing you how to set up pagination in the results provided by the Bolt CMS that includes handling to grab content from the database and display the results.

Bolt is a lightweight CMS built on Silex with Symfony components that’s fast, easy, and fun to develop with. My recent affinity for Bolt has turned it into my CMS of choice as I make a conscious effort to choose wisely and step away from bloated frameworks. Previously, I gave a very detailed insight into what it’s like developing with Bolt. Today, we’re going to break down a very popular task into steps in order to accomplish it with ease.

He starts with an installation of the Homestead Improved virtual machine and checks out a new copy of Bolt. He sets up a basic Bootstrap-based theme, including header and footer partial views. He then shows how to create "contenttypes" and fetch the current content records. He updates the Twig template to show the results and integrates the simple pagination. He then creates the single page version to view the content and "previous" and "next" links to accompany it.

tagged: bolt cms tutorial pagination content type management silex

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/record-retrieval-pagination-bolt-cms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
CMS Content Organization Structures: Trees vs Facets vs Tags
Feb 05, 2015 @ 11:38:35

In the latest post to the SitePoint PHP blog Lukas Smith takes a look at content management systems comparing trees versus facets versus tags in content organization.

For several years I have been interested in content repositories as a key aspect of modern CMS. With “modern”, I mean CMS that are not just “page management systems” but CMS that actually manage content, thereby enabling authors to reuse their content on different devices and even different applications. But when evaluating [prismic.io and contentful.com], I noticed a surprising trend: they do not leverage trees, neither as a native storage concept nor as a visualization concept. Instead, they for the most part rely on flat structures with tagging. My gut feeling was telling me that this was a mistake, especially when managing larger content repositories. At the same time I wondered: “Am I just a dinosaur that is missing the ark?”.

He starts with an introduction to the concepts of trees, facets and tags and starts in on the advantages and disadvantages of each. For each topic he shares a brief summary of what they are and a screenshot showing how they could be visualized. He finishes the post with a "tl;dr;" summarizing the points made for those wanting the basics.

tagged: cms content organization structure tree facet tag introduction

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/cms-content-organization-structures-trees-vs-facets-vs-tags/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introducing OctoberCMS – a Laravel-based CMS
Nov 19, 2014 @ 09:22:00

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a recent post taking a closer look at the OctoberCMS, a content management system based on the Laravel framework. In this new post they walk you through what the CMS is, the features it has to offer and help you understand (and add to) the different kinds of elements.

October CMS is a lightweight, back to basics content management system built on Laravel, and on a mission to make your web development workflow easy again. It boasts a very simple and fast learning curve, with a guarantee that you’ll be off the ground and up and running in no time at all. It’s scalable and extensible through the plugin system, is easily maintainable through its file-based system, and allows for the effortless creation of administrative back-end interfaces. Before we dig a bit deeper into this promising CMS, let’s look at the foundation a bit.

They walk you through the install (from their GitHub repository) to get a sample site up and running. The tutorial then goes through each of the basic sections, explaining what they are and providing example code where appropriate:

  • Themes & Templates
  • Pages
  • Partials
  • Layouts
  • Content Blocks
  • the AJAX Module

They also talk about extensibility via plugins and components and link to more information for those looking for more detail.

tagged: octobercms laravel introduction cms content management system

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introducing-octobercms-laravel-based-cms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Joomla’s Coming of Age
Nov 13, 2014 @ 12:56:15

In the latest post to the SitePoint PHP blog Adedayo Adeniyi talks about Joomla's "coming of age" and some of the changes that have come/are coming in the latest versions.

Over the years, there has been a healthy rivalry between the main CMSes in use on the planet: WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla!, and all three have hosts of die-hard fans that would pitch for their favorites over the others any day. Don’t worry, I’m not about to add to the high pile of subjective CMS comparison posts available on the web. Instead, I will briefly review all the recent changes in Joomla! that have modernized it for the present day developer – from version 3.0 onwards (currently 3.3).

She talks about some of the most recent changes including easier updating, the tool being mobile friendly out of the box and more flexible user access handling. She also mentions the improvements in "developer friendliness" and that it's become a good bit more security-conscious. Other topics mentioned include the JED (Joomla Extension Directory), smart search/tagging and improved database handling.

tagged: joomla improvement version update cms contentmanagement

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/joomlas-coming-age/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introduction to Kirby CMS
Apr 28, 2014 @ 13:48:31

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new article introducing you to Kirby, a database-less content management system that's all file based.

Kirby is a lightweight CMS that probably fits somewhere between feature-rich platforms such as Drupal, and static site generators such as Jekyll. What makes Kirby quite different to most CMS’s – and closer to Jekyll in the process – is that it has no database. Instead, everything is stored as files; some for configuration, some for content – all in addition to the usual template files, partials and plugins. In this article I’m going to take a look at Kirby, demonstrate how to use it, and assess some of its strengths and weaknesses.

He walks you through the download and installation process and provides a general overview of the structure of the application and how it works. He gets into the specifics of theming the site to match your own look and feel, shows you how to use "kirbytext", a custom extension of Markdown. He also briefly covers plugins, the main panel and some of the pros and cons of using the system.

tagged: kirby cms content management system file

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/introduction-kirby-cms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
CMS Showdown: Nginx, Ghost, PHP and Phalcon
Mar 20, 2014 @ 12:58:18

On the SitePoint PHP blog today Bruno Skvorc has written up the first part of his look at installing Ghost with Nginx and Phalcon on his hosting provider. This is the first post in his "showdown" series of trials on various CMS systems.

You might be wondering why I’m writing about Ghost on a PHP oriented channel – this series will be a showdown of all the various PHP based CMS’ I can find, benchmarked against each other and against Ghost, as I look for the next best alternative. Since my DigitalOcean droplet already runs Nginx as a reverse proxy for the blog, I’ll also be deploying all the CMS’ on that same installation, each on its own subdomain.

He walks you through the whole process from start to finish:

  • Installing PHP on Nginx
  • Setting up a virtual host on a subdomain
  • Installing Phalcon
tagged: sitepoint cms showdown nginx phalcon ghost

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/cms-showdown-nginx-ghost-php-phalcon

Statamic 101
Dec 11, 2013 @ 10:40:41

NetTuts.com has a new tutorial posted today introducing you to Statamic, a PHP-based content management system that uses flat-files instead of database entries to manage its content. (One note, Statamic is not free software and there's no "trial" version)

Statamic is a modern PHP CMS which really makes an effort to be easy and intuitive to use. From its flat-file design to its use of technologies, like markdown and Yaml, you can accomplish an outstanding amount of work without writing any code at all. In this article we will take a look at the process from installation to setting up a basic portfolio.

The CMS (downloadable here) has a simpler structure than some other systems as most of the content is just files in the "_content" directory. They talk some about the directory structure of the tool and help you get things configured via the main YAML config. The post then moves on to working with themes and how to get dynamic content in a basic layout. From there they go on to talk about making new content, adding entries and various other topics like administration and templating.

tagged: statamic cms introduction file markdown template layout content

Link: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/statamic-101

Getting Started with Fuel CMS, Part 2
Dec 20, 2012 @ 11:07:08

PHPMaster.com has published the second article in their working with Fuel CMS series (part one here). This time he focuses on working with modules and creating self-contained blocks of reusable functionality.

In the previous article you learned about the basics of Fuel CMS: how to create views and simple pages. Most websites these days are not that simple though, they have a blog, a gallery, etc. In this part, I’ll explain how Fuel CMS modules work and create a basic guestbook module to demonstrate.

He starts off by introducing the concept of a "module" and what kind of functionality that represents in the Fuel CMS ecosystem. Then he gets into the actual code, showing you how to create a model that connects to a "guestbook_comments" table and a controller to handle a request to "view" and "add" (save) them.

tagged: fuelcms tutorial introduction series contentmanagement cms modules


Getting Started with Fuel CMS, Part 1
Dec 13, 2012 @ 12:36:24

On PHPMaster.com today there's a new tutorial posted helping you get started with the Fuel CMS (not related to the Fuel PHP framework), a CodeIgniter-based content management system.

When you hear the abbreviation CMS, you probably think about Drupal, Joomla, and even WordPress. However, there are alternatives to those heavy hitters if you want something more lightweight or flexible. If you’re look a simple administration interface, or integrate custom application code into the site, then I suggest exploring Fuel CMS. In this two-part series I’ll discuss some concepts of Fuel CMS. In this part I’ll talk about its installation and how to set up views. In the second part I’ll talk about writing a Fuel CMS module.

This first of the two articles starts with an overview of the CMS, helps you get it installed (via github) and how to create some of the basics - a first page and a new view.

tagged: fuelcms tutorial introduction series contentmanagement cms