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Mark Scherer:
Developing CakePHP 3+ Plugins, it’s fun!
Feb 01, 2016 @ 12:08:04

Mark Scherer has a post to his site looking at developing CakePHP 3+ plugins, showing how it's much easier than it used to be with previous versions of the framework.

he days of CakePHP 2 plugins and how difficult it was to actually develop plugins are over. Back in the days (OK, I still have to do it once in a while), there was even an app required to test a plugin. Since you didn’t want to have a boilerplate app for each plugin, you usually worked in your actual app. So you had cross contamination from that messing up your tests and stuff. Really annoying.

[...] While most of the concrete examples are about plugin development for CakePHP 3, the main ideas apply to all library code you write. And if you are a developer for other frameworks, the same principles apply, only the concrete implementation might differ.

He starts with the "real story" behind his development of a plugin - a need to integrate hashid support into a CakePHP v3-based application. He uses his own library as an example (here on GitHub) and shares his thought and development process in its creation. He then shares a few helpful tips for the would-be plugin authors out there:

  • Thinking about what should be in core vs a plugin.
  • Try to follow coding and package principles.
  • Following the six package principles including common reuse, common closure and package coupling practices.
tagged: cakephp3 framework plugin example principles tips hashid

Link: http://www.dereuromark.de/2016/01/29/developing-cakephp-3-plugins-its-fun/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
OctoberCMS CRUD – Building a Team/Project Management Plugin
Jan 28, 2016 @ 10:32:47

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series covering the use of the OctoberCMS product to create a custom content management system tailored to your needs. In this new part of the series they show how to build a custom plugin for team management, showing how to use models and controllers along the way.

So far, we covered different aspects of OctoberCMS. This is a follow up article to discover how to use OctoberCMS for CRUD applications and take a detailed view at how to work with models, relations and controllers. [...] We are going to build a project management plugin where you can add different users to teams and assign them to projects.

You'll need to follow the first part of the series if you want to be able to follow along. Once you have that set up they show how to use the artisan command to create the plugin scaffold code and what the resulting pluginDetails function should look like. The tutorial then shows you how to create the related database tables and how to add the "team" column to the current user table. They then get in to creating the models to work with the tables, building out the controllers and view to manage the teams and the same kinds of handling for the "projects" the teams are related to. The post ends with a look at creating lists of projects/teams, adding in filtering and working with permissions for the management of teams.

tagged: octobercms series plugin custom team project management

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/octobercms-crud-building-a-teamproject-management-plugin/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Tutorial on Using Drupal 8 Plugin Derivatives Effectively
Jan 20, 2016 @ 12:24:38

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial posted for the Drupal users out there showing you how to use plugin derivatives effectively.

In this article we will explore the long answer to that and learn what derivates are and how we can use them. For the latter, we will build an example inside the demo module that can be found in this git repository and which should hopefully help us better understand what’s going on. For a slightly more complex example, the Menu system is great as it provides an individual block for each of its menus (similar to Drupal 7 but using plugins).

They're basically creating a system that allows the dynamic creation of Node Blocks for each of the article nodes but it's just an example of how (and not a recommendation on what you should do). They start in by talking about plugin derivatives - what they are and how they fit into the overall Drupal 8 code structure. The tutorial then shows the creation of the derivative class and explain each part of the code that makes it up. Following this is the other half of the functionality, is the block plugin class that will generate the instances of itself as requested.

tagged: drupal8 plugin derivatives example tutorial node block article

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/tutorial-on-using-drupal-8-plugin-derivatives-effectively/

Alejandro Celaya:
Improve DI in PHP apps with Zend Framework plugin managers
Jan 04, 2016 @ 11:40:39

In this new post to his site Alejandro Celaya offers some advice on improving the dependency injection of your application with the help of the Zend Framework plugin managers. More specifically he talks about the AbstractPluginManager, a part of the ZendServiceManager package.

Generally it is a very bad practice to inject a service container into any object, but there are some situations where it could be even good, when certain conditions are met.

In one of the ZF2 mailing lists somebody asked which were these situations. I couldn't find the email, but the answers said that you can do it when the service container manages resources of the same type, and your object virtually depends on all of them. [...] If you have another object that needs to perform database connections, you don't want to inject all of the connection objects into it, you should rather inject the connection pool. That will reduce the number of dependencies of your object.

In this situation, the connection pool is some kind of service container, but injecting it has more benefits than disadvantages.

He shows how to use the AbstractPluginManager to achieve this goal, noting the existence of a validatePlugin method that can be used to ensure all necessary dependencies are available. He includes a real example of it in use, creating a simple "social plugin manager" that verifies that the plugin provided is either a closure or instance of FilterInterface.

tagged: dependency injection di zendframework plugin manager tutorial abstractpluginmanager

Link: http://blog.alejandrocelaya.com/2015/12/31/improve-dependency-injection-in-php-apps-with-zend-framework-plugin-managers/

Gonzalo Ayuso:
POST Request logger using websockets
Nov 17, 2015 @ 10:25:32

In this post to his site Gonzalo Ayuso shows you how to create a logger for your POST requests and their information with a bit of helpful code and Websockets.

Last days I’ve been working with background geolocation with an ionic application. There’s a cool plugin to do that. [...] Basically this plugin performs a POST request to the server with the GPS data. [...] I can develop a simple Silex application with a POST route and log the request in a file or flush those request to the console. This’d have been easy but as far as I’m a big fan of WebSockets (yes I must admit that I want to use WebSockets everywhere :) I had one idea in my mind.

He shows the creation of a simple Silex-based application with just two endpoints (channel that handles both GET and POST) that uses the Guzzle HTTP library to listen on the Websockets port for incoming connections. He then shows how to add the code necessary on the frontend (using express) to send the POST data automatically to the waiting Silex application. He's provided the full working code for the example on his GitHub account as well so you can see it fully fleshed out.

tagged: websockets post log silex tutorial example gps plugin automatic debug

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2015/11/16/post-request-logger-using-websockets/

Tyler Longren:
Use Composer in Your WordPress Plugin or Theme
Nov 16, 2015 @ 10:22:47

In this post to his site Tyler Longren shows how to use Composer to install WordPress plugins as well as the usual libraries.

I love Composer. It just makes including libraries or scripts in your app incredibly easy. So easy that it’s stupid not to use it (in many, if not most cases).

[...] I'd never used Composer with a proprietary WordPress plugin before. The plugin is for a client so it’ll never be available to the public. Here’s the steps I took to make this WordPress plugin compatible with Composer so that I can easily bring in third-party libraries.

He breaks it down into a five step process, showing the installation of the Mailgun PHP client:

  • Install composer on your server
  • Add Mailgun as a dependency
  • Check your composer.json file
  • Tell composer to install Mailgun
  • Autoload Our Mailgun Classes in Our Plugin

With the help of Composer, the Mailgun client is ready to go and accessible in his WordPress instance, quickly and easily.

tagged: composer wordpress plugin mailgun client install autoload

Link: https://longren.io/use-composer-in-your-wordpress-plugin-or-theme/

Zend Developer Zone:
Developing a Z-Ray Plugin 101
Nov 04, 2015 @ 10:44:13

The Zend Developer Zone has posted a tutorial showing you the basics of creating a plugin for Z-Ray, the tool from Zend that provides details and metrics around the execution of your application.

One of the great things about Z-Ray is the ability to extend it to display any info you want about your app. This is done by creating plugins. In this tutorial I’m going to describe how to create a new Z-Ray plugin. I’ll be supplying code snippets to insert in the various plugin files but of course feel free to replace it with your own code when possible.

They start by describing how Z-Ray shows its data and offering two options - the default panel or a custom panel. They choose the custom panel and show you how to:

  • create the template for the panel
  • make the module directory and zray.php
  • and Modules.php file to define the plugin

There's also a section on how the Z-Ray plugin traces through the execution of your application, illustrating with a DummyClass. They include the code to set up the Trace and define which methods and actions to watch. Finally they relay this information back out to the custom panel view via Javascript collection and the code to show the results.

tagged: zray plugin custom performance dummyclass execution tracer tutorial

Link: http://devzone.zend.com/6826/developing-a-z-ray-plugin-101/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Drupal 8 Custom Plugin Types
Sep 14, 2015 @ 11:08:06

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted an overview from Daniel Sipos covering custom plugin types in Drupal 8 and how you can combine them (custom forms) with node entities.

In this article series of two parts, we will use this system to build a feature that allows the use of custom forms together with node entities. After we’re done, we’ll be able to do the following: configure node bundles to use one of multiple form types to be displayed together with the node display and easily define new form types by extending from a sensible base class. [...] We will get started by creating our custom plugin type. T

He starts with the plugin manager, showing you how to create a custom ReusableFormsManager in the module to set up the manager and add it to the system. He then sets up the plugin interface the manager is expecting to find. This piece defines methods to get the name of the plugin and to build the form. He then creates a simple ReusableForm annotation class and builds out the plugin base. This base class includes a form builder object used to build and output the custom form. Finally he gets into building the form and its matching interface. It's a simple "Contact Us" kind of form that outputs three fields (first name, last name, email) and a "Submit" button.

tagged: drupal8 custom plugin type tutorial form contactus

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/drupal-8-custom-plugin-types/

Laravel News:
Installing Zend Z-Ray on Homestead
Aug 25, 2015 @ 10:45:01

On the Laravel News site there's a tutorial posted showing you how to Install the Zend Z-Ray tool on Homestead, the popular Laravel-related virtual machine environment. This tool helps with debugging applications by giving you an inside look (a sort of "x-ray") into its inner workings as it executes.

For the past week or so I have been running Zend Z-Ray in Laravel Homestead. Every time using it, new features come to light that are fantastic for debugging your apps in development! What follows is a quick preview of Z-Ray, along with all the steps necessary to install it on Laravel Homestead.

He talks some about the Z-Ray tool and the features it has to offer as well as some of the technologies it supports. He also covers some of the Laravel specific features included like project information, route inspection and current user information. He then gets into the Administration panel, what kinds of information it provides and, finally, how to get it all installed and working. It's not a super simple process but all the commands you'll need are included in the post.

tagged: install zray zend tool plugin laravel tutorial inspect

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2015/08/installing-zend-z-ray-on-homestead/

Drupalize.me:
Learning Drupal 8 from Boilerplate Code
Jul 30, 2015 @ 11:48:06

On the Drupalize.me site they've posted a guide to getting started with Drupal 8 based on the boilerplate code that already comes with the release.

Drupal 8 represents a lot of changes and a steep learning curve for many Drupal developers and themers. While many of these changes are exciting, there are many things to learn just to get started. One way to learn about the code involved with Drupal 8 modules and themes is to take a look at core's modules and themes for examples to follow. Another is to use a code-scaffolding tool like Drupal Console to generate boilerplate code and comments that you can learn from and then customize.

He makes the assumption that you already have a development environment set up and working then helps you install the Drupal Console for use in the rest of the tutorial. You can then use this command line tool to create a new Drupal 8 installation and generate the boilerplate code for a new theme. Finally, they show the creation of the two other related components: a new module and a block plugin instance. These are generate generic code you can use as a reference point for either updating your current Drupal projects or create new ones.

tagged: drupal8 commandline console instance theme plugin block installation

Link: https://drupalize.me/blog/201507/learning-drupal-8-boilerplate-code