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Matt Sparks:
Building a PHP Framework: Part 5 – Test Driven Development
May 30, 2018 @ 12:55:12

Matt Sparks has posted the latest tutorial in his "Building a PHP framework" series of posts. In this latest article he covers the use of test-driven development during the development of some of the first framework code.

In part 4 we laid the foundation for Analyze. Now it’s time to write the very first lines of code! [...] Essentially, test driven development is a process of writing tests before writing any code, then writing code that passes the tests. [...] If you’re new to TDD, this probably seems pretty weird. Stick with me.

He starts with a brief definition of what test-driven development (TDD) is and what tool he'll be using to create the tests. Next is a simple example of a test that creates a class instance (NumberAdder) and calls an add method on it. This fails because none of this exists yet, hence the "test first" part of TDD. He then goes back and creates the class and method and loads them so the test can use them.

tagged: build framework tutorial series part5 tdd testdriven development

Link: https://developmentmatt.com/building-a-php-framework-part-5-test-driven-development/

Asmir Mustafic:
Modular Application Architecture - Considerations
Jan 08, 2018 @ 12:54:36

Asmir Mustafic has continued his series looking at building modular applications with part five looking specifically at some of the considerations and ideas to keep in mind when developing your modular applications.

This is the fifth post from a series of posts that will describe strategies to build modular and extensible applications. In this post we will take a general overview on how some popular design patterns and things to keep in mind when creating plugin based applications.

[...] Anthony Ferrara (alias ircmaxell), in this post blogged about the use of software patterns to implement plugin-based architectures. It is a great article and I suggest everybody to read it. As it is clear from the article, each of this software patterns has a specific use case and the choice of which one to use depends on which the of integration we want allow for the future plugins.

The article starts with a brief recap of some of the more common design patterns including the Observer, Strategy, Decorator and Chain of Responsibility. It then covers some quick uses of these patterns and shares two tips when developing a plugin system for the application and links to good examples for reference.

tagged: modular application architecture series part5 consideration designpattern plugin

Link: https://www.goetas.com/blog/modular-application-architecture-considerations/

Asmir Mustafic:
How do I deploy my Symfony API - Part 5 - Conclusion
Oct 31, 2017 @ 12:47:25

Asmir Mustafic has finished out his series showing his method for the deployment of Symfony applications with part five sharing some additional improvements that could be made to the system created in the four previous parts.

This is the fifth post from a series of posts that described the whole deploy process from development to production of a Symfony API. This series of blog posts had the aim to show a possible approach to build a continuous integration and continuous delivery pipeline.

The continuous integration and continuous delivery process reduces bugs and makes the development simper. [...] As always happen in software development, solutions are not perfect. There is always room for improvement. Here are few examples of what could have be done better. Obviously can be done better and this are not all the possible improvements that can be done on the system.

In the remainder of the article he includes changes that could be made to the:

  • migration execution, allowing for it to be done between deployments
  • performing health checks of the API
  • Docker container placement
  • putting PHP and Nginx into the same container
  • "node draining" (removing a node from a cluster)

He wraps up the post with a mention of a tool, Kubernetes, that can help to make the configuration and management of your containers easier.

tagged: deploy symfony api tutorial series part5 conclusion

Link: https://www.goetas.com/blog/how-do-i-deploy-my-symfony-api-part-5-conclusion/

Matt Stauffer:
New JSON-column where() and update() syntax in Laravel 5.3
Jul 11, 2016 @ 11:03:49

In his continuing series of posts looking at the new features in Laravel 5.3, Matt Stauufer has posted this guide to the use in the new JSON column functionality MySQL now provides in recent versions.

While Laravel has had the ability to cast your data to and from JSON since version 5.0, it was previously just a convenience—your data was still just stored in a TEXT field. But MySQL 5.7 introduced an actual JSON column type.

Laravel 5.3 introduces a simple syntax for lookups and updates based on the value of specific keys in your JSON columns.

He gives an example of a simple table with a JSON column storing some metadata for the entry. He includes a bit of example content showing the full entry and related metadata and the where format for querying it. It also includes the ability to run updates on the data just like with any other where clause.

tagged: laravel jon column mysql tutorial series part5 feature

Link: https://mattstauffer.co/blog/new-json-column-where-and-update-syntax-in-laravel-5-3

TutsPlus.com:
Kick-Start WordPress Development With Twig: Timber Image, Menu, and User
May 02, 2016 @ 10:51:47

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their series looking at integrating WordPress and Twig with a look at showing images, menus and users in your WordPress UI.

By now you have read about the basic concepts of using Twig through Timber, while building a modular WordPress theme. We've also studied block nesting and multiple inheritance with Twig, based on the DRY principle. Today, we are going to explore how to display attachment images, WordPress menus, and users in a theme with Twig through the Timber plugin.

They go through each of the topics (images, menus and users) and provide the code needed to both gather the data needed and the templates to render the views. This all makes heavy use of the Timber functionality to integrate it with the overall WordPress structure. Screenshots are also included of the resulting output to help you ensure things are working as expected.

tagged: kickstart wordpress development twig timber tutorial series part5

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/kick-start-wordpress-development-with-twig-timber-image-menu-and-user--cms-25750

Derick Rethans:
Xdebug 2.3: Improvements to Tracing
Mar 31, 2015 @ 11:15:33

Derick Rethans has posted a new article in his series highlighting some of the changes in the latest release of Xdebug (v2.3). In this new post he talks about some of the improvements in the trace file functionality.

Trace files are a way to document every function call, and if you enable it, variable assignment and function's return values — including when these functions were called, and how much memory PHP was using at the moment of function entry (and exit). Xdebug 2.3 adds a new type of parameter rendering for stack traces and function traces through the xdebug.collect_params setting.

This new setting allows much more information to be reported back in the trace results, adding on a serialized version of the value of variables. He also shows the output results (human-readable) that shows the memory usage and time index for the execution. He also shows the new handling to include return values in the trace output using the "xdebug.trace_format" handling.

tagged: tracing improvement xdebug release series part5 output

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/xdebug-2.3-tracing-improvements.html

Matthew Weier O'Phinney:
Deployment with Zend Server (Part 5 of 8)
Sep 10, 2014 @ 13:40:49

Matthew Weier O'Phinney has posted the latest in his "deployment with Zend Server" tips today, part five of eight. In this latest post he talks about setting the status of a job.

This is the fifth in a series of eight posts detailing tips on deploying to Zend Server. The previous post in the series detailed how to secure your Job Queue job scripts. Today, I'm sharing some best practices around writing job scripts, particularly around how to indicate execution status.

When he talks about the "status" of a job he's referencing the return code that's provided back to the executing script sharing the pass/fail status of its execution. He shows how to use the ZendJobQueue object and the setCurrentJobStatus to return a constant, either "FAILED" or "OK". He shows how to use it in an isolated example, outputting the results back as a plain text message that can be found in the "Output" tab of the job.

tagged: zendserver deployment tips series part5 return status failed ok

Link: https://mwop.net/blog/2014-09-09-zend-server-deployment-part-5.html

NetTuts.com:
Refactoring Legacy Code: Part 5 - Game's Testable Methods
May 27, 2014 @ 09:29:33

NetTuts.com continues on with their next part of their refactoring series today in this new post focusing on (unit) testing more of the application. This includes both the code for the tests and the before/after of the refactored code.

Old code. Ugly code. Complicated code. Spaghetti code. Gibberish nonsense. In two words, Legacy Code. This is a series that will help you work and deal with it. In our previous tutorial, we tested our Runner functions. In this lesson, it is time to continue where we left off by testing our Game class. [...] It is much better to start testing it by its short, testable methods. This is what we'll do in this lesson: find and test those methods.

They start with creating a new "Game" object and finding the first testable method in the class. The tutorial works through this and other related methods to build up a set of "Game" tests and eventually doing some refactoring on the tests themselves. With one method down and tested, they move on to finding and creating the tests for the next few testable methods, looking for something "controllable" that makes for easy testing.

tagged: refactor legacy code series part5 unittest game method

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/refactoring-legacy-code-part-5-games-testable-methods--cms-21213

Pádraic Brady's Blog:
Complex Views with the Zend Framework - Pt 5: The Two-Step View Pattern
May 24, 2007 @ 08:43:00

Pádraic Brady is back today with the latest installment (part 5!) of his look at complex views in the Zend Framework. This time, her focuses on something called the Two-Step Pattern - a pattern similar to the Layouts pattern.

Part 5 of our series takes a small time-out from approaching a Composite View solution to reusable Views to take a peek at a simpler approach useful for simpler types of web applications. As we've discussed previously Composite Views allow the nesting of reusable View elements, effectively building a View based on a hierarchy of Views. But often there are simpler solutions to simpler problems. One such solution is the Two-Step View pattern, sometimes called Layouts if implemented in a specific way (as we do below!).

He gives the example of a simple website that needs a header and footer on every page. Rather than having to duplicate the header/footer calls across all of the pages, the Layout (Step-Two) pattern defines a single template that contains the header and footer but also uses a "main" area where the content is dynamically inserted.

He includes a full code example to help illustrate the point - a class, Zps_View, that is fed the path to the layouts and the layout files to use before rendering.

tagged: part5 complexviews zendframework twostep designpattern layout part5 complexviews zendframework twostep designpattern layout

Link:

Pádraic Brady's Blog:
Complex Views with the Zend Framework - Pt 5: The Two-Step View Pattern
May 24, 2007 @ 08:43:00

Pádraic Brady is back today with the latest installment (part 5!) of his look at complex views in the Zend Framework. This time, her focuses on something called the Two-Step Pattern - a pattern similar to the Layouts pattern.

Part 5 of our series takes a small time-out from approaching a Composite View solution to reusable Views to take a peek at a simpler approach useful for simpler types of web applications. As we've discussed previously Composite Views allow the nesting of reusable View elements, effectively building a View based on a hierarchy of Views. But often there are simpler solutions to simpler problems. One such solution is the Two-Step View pattern, sometimes called Layouts if implemented in a specific way (as we do below!).

He gives the example of a simple website that needs a header and footer on every page. Rather than having to duplicate the header/footer calls across all of the pages, the Layout (Step-Two) pattern defines a single template that contains the header and footer but also uses a "main" area where the content is dynamically inserted.

He includes a full code example to help illustrate the point - a class, Zps_View, that is fed the path to the layouts and the layout files to use before rendering.

tagged: part5 complexviews zendframework twostep designpattern layout part5 complexviews zendframework twostep designpattern layout

Link: