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Lorna Mitchell:
PHP: Calling Methods on Non-Objects
Oct 19, 2015 @ 10:53:57

In a quick post to her site Lorna Mitchell describes a small difference in error messaging that's changed between PHP versions when trying to call methods on non-objects between versions 5.5, 5.6 and the upcoming PHP 7.

PHP has subtly changed the wording of this error between various versions of the language, which can trip up your log aggregators when you upgrade so I thought I'd give a quick rundown of the changes around the "call to member function on non-object" error in PHP, up to and including PHP 7 which has an entirely new error handling approach.

She includes examples of the error messages for PHP 5.5 and 5.6, differing only in how they report back the type of the variable the method was called on (one gets more specific). In PHP 7, however, the message is different because of the major overhaul that error handling has gotten. The new Error inheritance model still has it throw a fatal but it also notes it's an uncaught error which can be caught with the same try/catch as any other exception.

tagged: object error message version php5 php7 example output uncaught

Link: http://www.lornajane.net/posts/2015/php-calling-methods-on-non-objects

Exporting Drupal Nodes with PHP and Drush
Oct 06, 2015 @ 11:09:11

The php[architect] site has posted a tutorial showing you how to export Drupal nodes with Drush and a bit of regular PHP. Drush is a command line tool that makes working with Drupal outside of the interface simpler and easier to automate.

Drupal 8 development has shown that PHP itself, and the wider PHP community, already provides ways to solve common tasks. In this post, I’ll show you some core PHP functionality that you may not be aware of; pulling in packages and libraries via Composer is a topic for another day.

The tutorial walks through a more real-world situation of needing to export a CSV file that shows a list of nodes added to the site after a specific date. He points out some of the benefits of doing it the Drush way and starts in on the code/configuration you need to set the system up. He shows how to create the Drush command itself and update it with a method to export the newest nodes (after validating the date provided). He makes use of a SplFileObject to output the results from the EntityFieldQuery query out into to the CSV file. He makes use of PHP's generators functionality to only fetch the records a few at a time. Finally he includes the command to execute the export, defining the date to query the node set and how to push that output to a file.

tagged: export drupal node drush commmandline csv output query generator

Link: https://www.phparch.com/2015/10/exporting-drupal-nodes-with-php-and-drush/

Knp University:
Fun with Symfony's Console Component
Oct 06, 2015 @ 10:26:41

In a post to the Knp University blog they show you some of the fun you can have with the Symfony Console component in a single file including a few lesser known (and lesser used) features.

One of the best parts of using Symfony's Console component is all the output control you have to the CLI: colors, tables, progress bars etc. Usually, you create a command to do this. But what you may not know is that you can get to all this goodness in a single, flat PHP file.

They walk you through the creation of a ConsoleOutput object with a simple writeln output of a formatted method. They briefly mention the handling for changing up the output (OutputFormatter and OutputFormatterStyle) before getting into something a bit more complex - table layouts. They end the post with an interesting "hidden" feature inside the component, the Symfony track progress bar (animated gif included to show the end result).

tagged: symfony console component feature pretty output table track progressbar

Link: http://knpuniversity.com/blog/fun-with-symfonys-console

Ignace Nyamagana Butera:
Q&A: Enforcing enclosure with LeagueCsv
Sep 04, 2015 @ 11:19:44

Ignace Nyamagana Butera has a post has a post to his site showing how to use the LeagueCsv library for encapsulation in CSV output.

It is common knowledge that PHP’s fputcsv function does not allow enforcing the enclosure on every field. Using League CSV and PHP stream filter features let me show you how to do so step by step.

He walks you through the process of getting the library installed and using it (seven easy steps) to correctly contain the CSV values according to its contents:

  • Install league csv
  • Choose a sequence to enforce the presence of the enclosure character
  • Set up you CSV
  • Enforce the sequence on every CSV field
  • Create a stream filter
  • Attach the stream filter to the Writer object

Each step includes the code you'll need to make it work and a final result is shown at the end of the post. He does offer a few extra tips at the end of the post around some extra validation he added and where you can register the stream filter.

tagged: leaguecsv csv data output encapsulation stream filter

Link: http://nyamsprod.com/blog/2015/qa-enforcing-enclosure-with-leaguecsv/

Freek Van der Herten:
Speed up a Laravel app by caching the entire response
Jul 20, 2015 @ 08:12:55

Freek Van der Herten has written up a tutorial for his site showing the Laravel users out there how to cache their entire response to speed up the overall performance of their application.

A typical request on an dynamic PHP site can do a lot of things. It’s highly likely that a bunch database queries are performed. On complex pages executing those queries and hydrating them can slow a site down. The response time can be improved by caching the entire response. The idea is that when a user visits a certain page the app stores the rendered page.

With a little help from his package it's easy to enable. Just install the package, add the service provider and you're ready to go. All successful responses will be cached unless told otherwise and cache files will be written out to files by default. He does point out that caching like this, while handy and a nice "quick fix" shouldn't be used in place of proper application tuning methods though. He also links to two other external technologies that could be used for the same purpose: Varnish and Nginx's own cache handling.

tagged: laravel application response cache output serviceprovider package

Link: https://murze.be/2015/07/speed-up-a-laravel-app-by-caching-the-entire-response/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
4 Best Chart Generation Options with PHP Components
Jun 26, 2015 @ 08:30:29

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new article posted sharing four of the best charting libraries they've seen for use in your PHP applications. Options include both server and client side tools, making finding one for your situation easier.

Data is everywhere around us, but it is boring to deal with raw data alone. That’s where visualization comes into the picture. [...] So, if you are dealing with data and are not already using some kind of charting component, there is a good chance that you are going to need one soon. That’s the reason I decided to make a list of libraries that will make the task of visualizing data easier for you.

He starts with a brief comparison of the server side versus client side options, pointing out some high level advantages and disadvantages of each. He then gets into each of the libraries, giving an overview, an output example and some sample code to get you started:

  • Google Charts (Client Side)
  • FusionCharts (Client Side)
  • pChart (Server Side)
  • ChartLogix PHP Graphs (Server Side)

He ends with a wrapup of the options and links to two other possibilities you could also evaluate to find the best fit.

tagged: chart generation option component top4 list example output code

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/4-best-chart-generation-options-php-components/

Phil Sturgeon:
The Importance of Serializing API Output
Jun 01, 2015 @ 09:50:16

Phil Sturgeon as a new post to his site today talking about the importance of serialized API output and why it's important to think about what to share and how they're shared.

One section that seems to get a lot of feedback and questions is when I talk about serialization, which I refer to as “adding a presentation layer to your data”. [...] To PHP developers, they often consider serialization to be using the serialize() function. Yes, this is one form of serialization, but it’s not the only one. Another common serialization approach is of course to use the json_encode() function. [...] Excuse the drastically simplified chunk of code here, but the point is we’re taking a model (probably using an ORM) and returning the result directly. This seems fairly innocent, but leads to a range of problems.

He suggests that, when thinking about the data coming out of your API, you have to assume that every possible value could be shared if models are output directly. He gives the example of user passwords which, obviously, don't need to be shared at all. He includes an example of formatting the output with the Fractal library and why using something like that is important. He covers some of the topics to think about including attribute data types, renaming fields to make them more clear, the ability to pull from multiple data stores and the ability to version serializers. He ends the post with links to a few different serialization formats and some solutions (not just PHP ones) that can be used for the sort of handling he recommends.

tagged: serialize api output json fractal datatype json tutorial versioning

Link: https://philsturgeon.uk/api/2015/05/30/serializing-api-output/

Gonzalo Ayuso:
PHP Dumper using Websockets
May 11, 2015 @ 08:49:21

Gonzalo Ayuso has a quick post to his site showing you how to make a "PHP dumper" for websocket connections based on a simple Silex application.

Another crazy idea. I want to dump my backend output in the browser’s console. There’re several PHP dumpers. For example Raul Fraile’s LadyBug. There’re also libraries to do exactly what I want to do, such as Chrome Logger. But I wanted to use Websockets and dump values in real time, without waiting to the end of backend script. Why? The answer is simple: Because I wanted to it.

He shows how to create a simple socket server (with Express in Javascript) and the basic Silex application with a "DumperServiceProvider" added in that will handle returning the debugging data back to the waiting client. He connects the Silex application with the websocket and shows the code to listen for new messages on the socket and display them back out to the browser. You can see an example of the end result in this video on YouTube.

tagged: websocket tutorial dumper debug output client expressjs nodejs

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2015/05/11/php-dumper-using-websockets/

Derick Rethans:
Xdebug 2.3: Improvements to Tracing
Mar 31, 2015 @ 11:15:33

Derick Rethans has posted a new article in his series highlighting some of the changes in the latest release of Xdebug (v2.3). In this new post he talks about some of the improvements in the trace file functionality.

Trace files are a way to document every function call, and if you enable it, variable assignment and function's return values — including when these functions were called, and how much memory PHP was using at the moment of function entry (and exit). Xdebug 2.3 adds a new type of parameter rendering for stack traces and function traces through the xdebug.collect_params setting.

This new setting allows much more information to be reported back in the trace results, adding on a serialized version of the value of variables. He also shows the output results (human-readable) that shows the memory usage and time index for the execution. He also shows the new handling to include return values in the trace output using the "xdebug.trace_format" handling.

tagged: tracing improvement xdebug release series part5 output

Link: http://derickrethans.nl/xdebug-2.3-tracing-improvements.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Use Laravel Contracts to Build a Laravel 5 Twig Package
Mar 16, 2015 @ 11:52:13

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted showing you how to integrate Twig into a Laravel application with the help of the recently added "contracts" feature of the framework. Twig is a templating library that aims to be fast, secure and flexible for data output in multiple contexts.

Laravel 5 is finally out, and with all the awesome features it brings. One of the new architectural changes is the new Contracts Package. In this article we are going to understand the reasoning behind this change and try to build a practical use case using the new Contracts.

He starts with a brief look at what Contracts are and what it means to use them in a Laravel application. He then shows how to define the package installation (via Composer) to pull Twig in and register it with the application for future use. He creates a simple service provider to register Twig and return a new "TwigFactory" instance. This instance extends the "FactoryConnect" implementing the "ViewFactory" and, along with a custom "TwigView" object can be used just like you would normally output information via Blade.

tagged: laravel contract twig output template handling provider interface

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/use-laravel-contracts-build-laravel-5-twig-package/