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Rob Allen:
Simple way to add a filter to Zend-InputFilter
Jun 21, 2017 @ 09:16:29

Rob Allen has a quick new post to his site sharing a simple way to add a filter to the Zend-InputFilter component when it's in use on your site.

Using Zend-InputFilter is remarkably easy to use. [...] How do you add your filter to it though?

He starts with an example of putting the component to use in requiring and filtering the value in "my_field" for the data provided. He then shows how to add his "simple filter that does absolutely nothing", the MyFilter, to the current set. He also shows the creation of a "filter factory" class that registers the custom filter into the chain with an alias of "MyFIlter". You can then use it just like you would any other filter and define it in your rules specification.

tagged: zendframework zendinputfilter component custom filter tutorial factory

Link: https://akrabat.com/simple-way-to-add-a-filter-to-zend-inputfilter/

Alejandro Celaya:
How to customize "not found" and "method not allowed" response prototypes in Zend
May 31, 2017 @ 10:10:23

Alejandro Celaya has posted a new tutorial on his site showing how you can customized the "not found" and "not allowed" responses in a Zend Expressive v2 application based on the needs of your application.

Sometimes the nature of an application requires you to change the default framework's way to structure error responses (like 404 and 405).

On this article I'm going to explain how to customize those responses when working with Zend Expressive 2. [...] In Expressive 1, error handling was different. [...] In expressive 2, the error handler is gone, replaced by a middleware which catches exceptions and lets you generate error responses.

He notes that this new middleware approach (moving away from the error handler) doesn't deal with 404 and 405 errors anymore, they've been split out into other functionality. As these other middleware options allow for a custom PSR-7 response object to be injected, he sets up two "delegates" that will more correctly handle the response. He includes the examples code for these and shows how to hook them into the current Expressive execution flow.

tagged: zendexpressive tutorial customize notfound methodnotallowed response custom psr7

Link: https://blog.alejandrocelaya.com/2017/05/28/how-to-customize-not-found-and-method-not-allowed-response-prototypes-in-zend-expressive-2/

NetTuts.com:
How to Create a Laravel Helper
Apr 21, 2017 @ 15:15:28

On the NetTuts.com site there's a new tutorial from author Sajal Soni showing you how to create a custom Laravel helper, a set of helper functions that can be used through out the entire application.

Laravel includes a variety of global "helper" PHP functions. Many of these functions are used by the framework itself; however, you are free to use them in your own applications if you find them convenient. So, basically, helpers in Laravel are built-in utility functions that you can call from anywhere within your application. If they hadn't been provided by the core framework, you might have ended up developing your own helper classes.

Although the core provides a variety of helpers already, there’s always a chance that you’ll need your own and would like to develop one so you don’t have to repeat the same code here and there, thus enforcing better maintainability. You'll learn how to create a custom Laravel helper in this tutorial.

They start by talking about some of the current helpers and the functionality they relate to (arrays, paths, strings, etc). It then goes into the creation of the custom helper including the skeleton of the code layout, where to place them and how to load them into the application via a service provider.

tagged: custom laravel helper function creation tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-create-a-laravel-helper--cms-28537

Zend Framework Blog:
Error Handling in Expressive
Mar 24, 2017 @ 09:30:31

The Zend Framework blog has a new tutorial posted by Matthew Weier O'Phinney covering error handling techniques in Expressive with a few examples making use of some custom middleware and logic.

One of the big improvements in Expressive 2 is how error handling is approached. While the error handling documentation covers the feature in detail, more examples are never a bad thing!

In their example they're creating an API resource that returns a list of book details (ones the user has read). The goal is to use the existing error handling for everything except the custom exceptions they want to throw but keep with the JSON handling throughout. First the middleware to handling the API request is shown, complete with sorting and pagination. Then come the custom exception examples for invalid requests and server issues. These exceptions are then put into the Problem Details format with the help of another middleware. This then all tied together with the nested middleware handling Expressive provides and an example of the end result is included.

tagged: error handling expressive custom problemdetails tutorial json middleware

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-03-23-expressive-error-handling.html

Zend Framework Blog:
Nested Middleware in Expressive
Mar 16, 2017 @ 11:52:21

On the Zend Framework blog Matthew Weier O'Phinney has posted another tutorial, this time showing you how to use nested middleware in Expressive allowing for the composition of your own workflow in the request/response flow.

A major reason to adopt a middleware architecture is the ability to create custom workflows for your application. Most traditional MVC architectures have a very specific workflow the request follows. While this is often customizable via event listeners, the events and general request lifecycle is the same for each and every resource the application serves.

With middleware, however, you can define your own workflow by composing middleware.

He starts by describing one of the main concepts in the workflow of the application: pipelines. He gives an example of the default pipeline included with the Expressive skeleton application and how the middleware it uses nests to create a custom logic and handling flow. He follows this with an example scenario showing how to add authentication into the pipeline, specifically the use of Digest authentication via a PSR7 middleware package. Code is included for the integration of this package and the end result - all pages requiring authentication. He shows how to modify this and limit it to only certain paths and how to nest them in the route definitions.

Finally he shows another approach - creating a custom middleware pipeline inside of the factory for the requested middleware. He also covers nested applications, using traits for common workflows and the use of "delegator factories".

tagged: expressive tutorial nested middleware pipeline custom authentication example

Link: https://framework.zend.com/blog/2017-03-15-nested-middleware-in-expressive.html

DotDev.co:
Manage custom VM with Laravel Forge
Feb 15, 2017 @ 10:22:14

On the DotDev.co blog today there's a post from Jordon Brill showing you how to manage custom VMs with Laravel Forge. In his particular setup, the VMs he was working with weren't ones created by Forge so he needed to do some custom work to integrate the two.

I had a legacy php application that I wanted to move to a newer version of php. This application is not built on Laravel but rather is a conglomerate of a bunch of different php scripts and pieces of different frameworks. We recently deployed a Laravel-based application to a server running on AWS via Laravel Forge and Laravel Envoyer and fell in love with the service. We were completely up and running in about 10 minutes and it was great.

This case, however, was a bit outside of the typical scenario since it was not a Laravel application and Forge wasn’t going to be creating the server on one of the built-in services that Forge has an integration with (Linode, DigitalOcean, and AWS).

He starts by creating a new VM instance of a Ubuntu-based Linux system. He then shows how to connect it up to Laravel Forge via the "Custom VPS" option. This provides you with a custom command and token to use to make the connection to manage the server via Forge from then on. He does point out a few "gotchas": that it all needs to be run as the "root" account and that you'll need to open SSH ports in your firewall (if you have one) to allow the Forge service access.

tagged: laravel forge envoyer vm custom setup ubuntu tutorial

Link: https://dotdev.co/manage-custom-vm-with-laravel-forge-dc4c3218e415#.sehaglgkh

DotDev.co:
Creating a custom queue driver for Laravel
Feb 09, 2017 @ 19:21:04

On the DotDev.co blog there's a new post showing you how to create a custom queue driver for Laravel allowing you to define the logic and handling for background job processing with the framework.

Ever needed to use a queue service not supported by Laravel? No, me neither! However, recently I needed to tweak the config for the SQS driver in order to utilise a couple of the Amazon configuration settings. Unfortunately, these settings are not natively exposed by Laravel, so I decided to build my own driver. Here’s how it went.

The tutorial walks you through the creation of the queue class that extends the "Queue" interface already built into Laravel (and what methods it requires). It then mentions the custom connector class it'll require and the service provider to link it all together. There's also a section covering the configuration you'll need to define the queue properties and what changes you'll need to make.

tagged: tutorial custom queue driver laravel interface configuration serviceprovider

Link: https://dotdev.co/creating-a-custom-queue-driver-for-laravel-3ec6463fa881#.grumknpj8

TutsPlus.com:
Programming With Yii2: Helpers
Dec 27, 2016 @ 11:13:44

The TutsPlus.com site has continued their "Programming with Yii2" tutorial series with a new post introducing you to helper functions that come bundled with the framework. It also shows you how to create your own custom helper function, making it easier to perform common functions custom to your application.

In the Programming With Yii2 series, I'm guiding readers in use of the Yii2 Framework for PHP. In this tutorial, I'll provide a brief overview of helpers. In Yii, helpers are modules which group commonly useful libraries for string, file, image, URL and HTML management amongst other things, and they are easy to extend.

I'll also share an example of creating a helper within Meeting Planner, the focus of our Envato Tuts+ startup series.

The tutorial then introduces you to (and links you to) the common helpers the framework comes bundled with including the ArrayHelper, FileHelper and Markdown helpers. The tutorial then covers two in a bit more detail, the ArrayHelper and HtmlPurifier helper, including some code examples for each. Finally it shows the creation of a custom helper with several custom functions and their use in a template.

tagged: programming series yii2 framework helpers custom tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/programming-with-yii2-helpers--cms-26889

Alison Gianotto:
Demystifying Custom Auth in Laravel 5
Nov 21, 2016 @ 11:49:17

Alison Gianotto (a.k.a. Snipe) has a new post on her site talking about custom authentication in Laravel-based applications including built-in functionality and how you can override it to your needs.

I’m a big fan of Laravel. I use it in most of my personal and professional projects, and for the most part it really does make coding fun for me again. One of the things Laravel tries to do (similar to Rails) is to build in the most repetitive things a developer would have to do, for example a user registration/login/forgotten password system.

[...] In each of my current Laravel apps, auth works just a tiny bit differently. Add to that the fact that a few of them were pulled forward from Laravel version 4.2, and things can get confusing and messy. [...] Laravel makes this really, really easy – they just don’t document how to do it very well.

She starts by mentioning the "fresh" install version of building out the auth pieces (php artisan make:auth) but points out that, if a more "hybrid" system is needed, a bit more work is required. She shows you the routes that are created in the "make:auth" process and how/where you need to modify things to customize it to your system. She illustrates with some of her own changes including code examples.

tagged: laravel tutorial custom authentication framework

Link: http://snipe.net/2016/11/demystifying-custom-auth-in-laravel-5/

INANI El Houssain:
Build your OWN switch statment using Laravel’s custom blade directives
Nov 03, 2016 @ 10:26:01

In this post on his Medium blog INANI El Houssain shows you how to create a custom directive for use with Laravel's Blade templating language. In this example he shows how to make a custom switch statement, something commonly used on the PHP side to select an action based on a value.

One of the good points of Laravel’s framework is that it allows you to make your own components, macros and directives. so today we will make use of Laravel’s Custom Blade directives and make something good.

He starts with a simple "hello world" example to show where the pieces all live, outputting a simple "Hello $name" string. He then moves into the creation of the "@switch" directive having it write out the PHP code required for the switch to start and end. He adds in two more tags to start and end the different cases: @case and @endcase. The post wraps up with an example of all of these tags in use and how to catch when the value under evaluation might be empty.

tagged: laravel blade directive custom output switch tutorial case

Link: https://medium.com/@InaniT0/build-your-own-switch-statment-using-laravels-custom-blade-directives-218244e41a7c#.dtkbzif3j