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Anthony Ferrara:
Scalar Types and PHP
February 12, 2015 @ 11:25:47

Anthony Ferrara has tossed his own hat into the ring around the debate that's been going about the RFC for scalar type hints in PHP. In his post he agrees with (most of) the suggestions made in the proposal around strict, weak and the "compromise" of mixed typing.

There's currently a proposal that's under vote to add Pascal Martin's excellent post about it. What I want to talk about is more of an opinion. Why I believe this is the correct approach to the problem.

He starts off talking about the "all strict" angle that some suggested as the proper approach then moves into the "weak argument" explaining the difference between the two. He shares a bit of history around the problems detecting subtle bugs caused by typing issues and how it is definitely a problem that needs solving. Finally, he talks about the mixed-typing compromise and provides some code samples showing a common bug that can happen with weak typing.

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Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2015/02/scalar-types-and-php.html

NetTuts.com:
Design Patterns The Simple Factory Pattern
January 27, 2015 @ 11:53:20

NetTuts.com has posted the next part of their series focusing on design patterns (and more specifically implementing them in PHP). In this latest post they look at a simple version of the Factory design pattern.

When you think of a factory, what comes to mind? For me, it's a place where things are created - that is, it's a centralized placed where things are produced. Later, the delivery of said products are done by the factory based on an order. Let's say that you're requesting a car. A factory will create one based on the specifications of the work order and will then deliver it once it's complete. Just as their real world counterparts, a software factory (that is, software that implements the factory design pattern), is an object that is responsible for creating and delivering other objects based on incoming parameters.

They mention the three different versions of the factory pattern but focus in on the simplest one (hence the "simple" in the title). They continue on with the car example, showing how to use a simple factory (a "carFactory") to build an instance of the "Car" class based on different classes of car types. The object is constructed when a "build" method is called with the type.

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Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/design-patterns-the-simple-factory-pattern--cms-22345

Coder on Code:
Design Patterns in PHP Adapters
January 26, 2015 @ 10:46:42

The Coder on Code site has posted a new tutorial covering the Adapter design pattern in detail. They talk about what the pattern is, what it can be useful for and include some code to illustrate.

The adapter pattern also referred as the wrapper pattern, I find that wrapper is a more fitting name since it describes clearly what this pattern does; it encapsulates the functionality of a class or object into a class with a common public interfaces. [...] Adapters are one of the easiest patterns to comprehend and at the same time one of the most useful ones.

He starts with some of the basic definitions of terms involved in the pattern: client, adapter and adapteee. His example centers around a notification manager class that lets you switch types between Twitter, Email and SMS messaging. His initial code has all of the message types handled in one class method. He shows how to refactor this out to an interface and a set of child classes, each with the corresponding handling in a "sendNotification" method. These are then used by an adapter in the main class to send the given message. This simplifies the main messenger class and contributes to the overall improvement of architecture and testability of the application.

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Link: http://coderoncode.com/2015/01/25/design-patterns-in-php-adapters.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Writing API Documentation with Slate
December 15, 2014 @ 13:46:59

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial for the API developers out there showing you how you can use Slate for creating documentation. They point out a few other tools or formats you could use, but focus in on Slate, a Markdown-based tool that converts the result to HTML.

So you've built yourself an API. Perhaps it's RESTful, RESTlike or something else entirely. [...] There's one more thing, however. Thing is, an API is only as good as its documentation. That applies if it's for internal use only - perhaps it's for a JavaScript-based one-page app, or a mobile application - but even more so if it's for public consumption.

He includes an example of what the output looks like first so you know what the end result will be (and if it meets your needs). They then walk you through the installation of Slate and a few Ruby tools you'll need to generate the HTML output. He includes a simple example of the configuration and a simple document with four sections. He also shows how to use includes, alerts, tables and a sidebar. Finally he gives the "rake" command to build the documentation and how to you can push the result up to your own GitHub Pages.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/writing-api-documentation-slate/

Hack Blog:
Async - Cooperative Multitasking for Hack
December 08, 2014 @ 11:56:54

On the Hack blog there's a new post talking about async, a feature in Hack that allows for code to "cooperatively multitask". This gives the language a way to keep moving on in the execution without having to wait for things like database queries or remote file fetches to finish.

This is somewhat similar to threading, in that multiple code paths are executed in parallel, however it avoids the lock contention issues common to multithreaded code by only actually executing one section at any given moment. "What's the use of that?", I hear you ask. You're still bound to one CPU, so it should take the same amount of time to execute your code, right? Well, that's technically true, but script code execution isn't the only thing causing latency in your application. The biggest piece of it probably comes from waiting for backend databases to respond to queries.

She gives the example of pulling in a remote file (HTTPS, where there's a bit more latency) and how to use async, await, WaitHandle, and Awaitable to work around the timing issue. She shows how to make a method asynchronous and how to join the results of the operation back up with the rest of the script. This includes the use of various "handles" including RescheduleWaitHandle, SleepWaitHandle and the AwaitAllWaitHandle. She shows the integration of a custom cURL handler that makes use of this processing, marked async, to multithread the requests to the remote server(s).

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Link: http://hhvm.com/blog/7091/async-cooperative-multitasking-for-hack

Anthony Ferrara:
It's All About Time
December 01, 2014 @ 10:46:15

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara talks about a tricky subject in PHP - timing attacks. A timing attack has to do with vulnerabilities that can come up because of the differences in time it takes to perform cryptographic operations (like hashing or encrypting).
An interesting pull request has been opened against PHP to make bin2hex() constant time. This has lead to some interesting discussion on the mailing list (which even got me to reply :-X). There has been pretty good coverage over remote timing attacks in PHP, but they talk about string comparison. I'd like to talk about other types of timing attacks.

He starts with a definition of what a remote timing attack is and provides an example of a simple script showing the delay that's key to the attack. His script deals with string location but it gives you an idea of how the attack works and where the danger lies. He points out that even remotely attackers could determine the times to perform operations (down to the nanosecond) and use this to their advantage. He points out that both == and === are vulnerable to this type of attack because of how the comparison happens. He gives two options (one an internal function) to help protect your application and briefly covers a few other types of timing attacks: index lookup, cache-timing and branch-based timing attacks.

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Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/11/its-all-about-time.html

Mathias Verraes:
Higher Order Programming
November 24, 2014 @ 09:16:43

In his latest post Mathias Verraes looks at "higher level programming" in PHP. Higher order programming is a style of programming that uses components (like functions, modules or objects) as values.
Let's have some fun with higher order programming in PHP. I'll start by showing how to program with Lambdalicious (or λlicious for friends) and introduce the real meat along the way. Don't worry too much about the dark magic that may appear to power some of the features of Lambdalicious. It's on GitHub if you're curious. Just follow along and keep track of all the functions.

He breaks his examples up into (lots of) different examples, each with example code:

  • Atoms
  • Lists
  • Functions
  • Conditionals
  • Loops & List Processing
  • Deduplication
  • Filter and Reduce
  • Functions returning functions
  • Partial Function Application
  • Composition
  • Piping

He finishes off the post talking about Lambdalicious and how, in reality, it's just not suitable for anything useful as written in PHP. The language just doesn't have the right functionality to make it work sufficiently...even HHVM.

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Link: http://verraes.net/2014/11/higher-order-programming/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Re-introducing FuelPHP
November 10, 2014 @ 10:51:23

On the SitePoint PHP blog today they've posted a new tutorial that reintroduces you to FuelPHP, the framework that was (sort of) the successor to the CodeIgniter framework. It was started by some of the ex-CI developers in an effort to make a more robust, yet simple PHP framework for PHP 5.3+.

As a PHP developer, I have been a consistent user of different PHP frameworks, mostly focusing on CakePHP. Recently, I felt the need to go framework shopping and I have many valid reasons for choosing FuelPHP. It has a built-in modular structure and complete flexibility with emphasis on community. Before Fuel, I was a CakePHP user and just like Cake, Fuel is a huge community driven framework.

The author walks you through the installation process (via the framework's own "oil" command line tool) and dives into some example code quickly after that. He shows how to create a simple "Hello World" route and generate the scaffolding (code generation for the MVC pieces) including migrations. He creates a simple "users" table and adds some authentication checking to the controller. Then in the view he sets up a simple login form, requesting username and password and outputting any errors that might pop up during the authentication process.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/re-introducing-fuelphp/

Web Mozarts:
Defining PHP Annotations in XML
October 24, 2014 @ 11:10:53

The Web Mozarts blog has an interesting new post today that talks about using annotations in your PHP code to define the attributes in resulting XML that could be generated dynamically from your objects.

Annotations have become a popular mechanism in PHP to add metadata to your source code in a simple fashion. Their benefits are clear: They are easy to write and simple to understand. Editors offer increasing support for auto-completing and auto-importing annotations. But there are also various counter-arguments: Annotations are written in documentation blocks, which may be removed from packaged code. Also, they are coupled to the source code. Whenever an annotation is changed, the project needs to be rebuilt. This is desirable in some, but not in other cases.

They focus in on Symfony-based applications as a good base to work from (as they've pushed to have annotations work in the code for things like routing and data type definition). He starts with an example Doctrine class - a "best buddy" for Symfony as far as annotations go - and how the annotations define the different properties. He also includes an example of the XML output of the same definition generated through an "AnnotationReader" instance. He talks about having multiple XML documents representing one object with different annotations put in each, including the XML output. The post finishes with some advantages including the ease of validation by XML-friendly tools looking to interface with the application.

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Link: http://webmozarts.com/2014/10/24/defining-php-annotations-in-xml/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
PHP and RabbitMQ Advanced Examples
October 20, 2014 @ 14:19:33

On the SitePoint PHP blog Miguel Ibarra Romero continues his series looking at the use of RabbitMQ with PHP in part two. He builds on the code (and setup) from the first part of the series and gets into some more advanced examples this time.

In part 1 we covered the theory and a simple use case of the AMQP protocol in PHP with RabbitMQ as the broker. Now, let's dive into some more advanced examples.

The remainder of the post includes two examples of more advanced operations:

  • Example 1: send request to process data asynchronously among several workers
  • Example 2: send RPC requests and expect a reply

Each example includes a diagram of the overall flow of the process, the code to make it happen both for the sender and receiver.

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rabbitmq advanced example tutorial series part2

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/php-rabbitmq-advanced-examples/


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