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Master Zend Framework:
How to Test Zend Framework Applications with Codeception - Part Two
Oct 26, 2015 @ 09:31:13

The Master Zend Framework site has posted the second part of their tutorial series showing how to test Zend Framework applications with CodeCeption, a tool allowing for behavior-driven testing methods on PHP applications. In part two of the series they finish up the examples from part one and put them to use.

In part one of this series on testing Zend Framework applications with Codeception, we covered what Codeception is, how to install and configure it, and how to enable and configure the Zend Framework 2 module; finishing up by writing some basic acceptance and functional tests. [...] Here, in part two of the series we see how to retrieve and test registered services using BDD-style testing. This isn't going to be an exhaustive look at every possibility of what's available. Instead, what I'm going to do is show a simple set of examples which use two extra modules which come with Codeception and how they enable descriptive, BDD-style, tests.

The tutorial starts by getting into a bit more detail on what BDD-style testing is and some of the basic terminology. They help you install two modules to help make writing your tests simpler. The tutorial walks you through generating a new test for a fictional "Video" table gateway class and how to flesh it out to pull the service from the service manager, configure the database connection and write a few checks to verify the type of the service fetched and the number of records it returns.

tagged: zendframework2 service test bdd behavior codeception series part2 tutorial testing

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/testing-with-codeception-part-two/

Symfony Blog:
Paving the way for Symfony 3 with the "Deprecation Detector" tool
Oct 22, 2015 @ 10:48:31

On the Symfony blog there's a post talking about a tool they've introduced that is helping to "pave the way" for the upcoming version 3 release of the Symfony framework - the Deprecation Detector tool.

Symfony 3 will be released at the end of November 2015. Learning from our own history, the transition from Symfony 2 to 3 will be much more pleasant than the transition from symfony 1 to 2 that happened in July 2011.

Technically speaking, Symfony 3 includes no new features comparing it with Symfony 2.8, which will be released at the same time. [...] This means that your Symfony applications won't work on Symfony 3 unless you remove all their deprecations. In order to simplify the task of finding which deprecations affect your applications, a new tool called Deprecation Detector has just been released.

The tool runs static analysis against your codebase and finds locations where you're using deprecated methods/classes/interfaces/etc and reports them back for fixing. The post includes the commands you'll need to get the tool installed and how to run it against your code. You can find out more about the project and get details on command line options on its GitHub repository.

tagged: deprecation detector symfony2 symfony3 method interface class service tool tutorial

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/paving-the-way-for-symfony-3-with-the-deprecation-detector-tool

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Alternative way to inject providers in a Silex application
Oct 19, 2015 @ 11:18:10

Gonazalo Ayuso has shared a method he's found for injecting providers into Silex that replaces accessing the dependency injection container as an array. It instead replaces it and allows defining function parameters instead.

I normally use Silex when I need to build one Backend. It’s simple and straightforward to build one API endpoint using this micro framework. But there’s something that I don’t like it: The “array access” way to access to the dependency injection container. I need to remember what kind of object provides my service provider and also my IDE doesn’t help me with autocompletion. OK I can use PHPDoc comments or even create one class that inherits from SilexApplication and use Traits. Normally I’m lazy to do it. Because of that I’ve create this simple service provider to help me to do what I’m looking for. Let me explain it a little bit.

He includes examples of both the normal way you can access Silex's injection containers (the "array access" method) and contrasts this with his updated method, via a method parameter on the route closure. His service provider (complete code in the post and on github), when registered, looks for controller events and performs reflection on the closure to detect which objects need to be injected. The method is then called normally but with the extra attributes set, populating the parameters.

tagged: slex service provider alternative array access parameter method dependency injection

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2015/10/19/alternative-way-to-inject-providers-in-a-silex-application/

/Dev/Hell Podcast:
Episode 66: Aquinas on Customer Service
Oct 09, 2015 @ 11:57:23

The /Dev/Hell podcast, with hosts and PHP community members Chris Hartjes and Ed Finkler, has posted their latest episode - Episode 66: Aquinas on Customer Service

Episode 66 was recorded live right after the inaugural Pacific Northwest PHP Conference. We make fun of our sponsors, talk about smelly tests, Thomas Aquinas, remote pairing with juniors, and new stuff happening with OSMI.

Topics mentioned in this episode include the PNWPHP conference, Sara Golemon, Smelly Tests and The Last Starfighter. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. Also be sure to subscribe to their feed or mailing list to get notified when new episodes are released.

tagged: devhell podcast ep66 aquinas customer service edfinkler chrishartjes

Link: http://devhell.info/post/2015-10-07/aquinas-on-customer-service/

Dependencies in Disguise
Sep 28, 2015 @ 08:48:27

On the PHP.cc's site has an article that looks at dependencies in disguise based on a "workshop" one of their members, Stefan Priebsch, gave at the recent Bulgaria PHP Conference.

Yesterday I gave a presentation at the [Bulgaria PHP Conference](https://thephp.cc/dates/2015/09/bulgaria-php-conference) (a great event, by the way). Following an [ad-hoc workshop](https://twitter.com/s_bergmann/status/647732967087939584) that I gave as part of the hallway track and an entertaining hackathon, I decided it was too late to join the party and went back to the hotel with some other speakers. Checking out how the day was reflected in social media, I contributed a few more tweets to a [conversation](https://twitter.com/tim_bezhashvyly/status/647861115721003008) that had started earlier in the day ([here](https://thephp.cc/dates/2015/09/bulgaria-php-conference/solid-mvc) are the slides of my talk that people are referring to). I am writing this to clarify my point, and help everybody to understand better.

He talks about dependency injection as a best practice that's followed in libraries all over the PHP ecosystem, making it easier to work with objects and their needs. Sometimes this means using a dependency injection container and others it's just constructor/method injection. He talks about how these objects are build in factory methods and recommends making one factory but points out that this only really works when all the objects you need are known up front. However, he gives several (code) examples of places where this could be difficult and how some are using service locators to solve the problem. He points out, however, that this then expands the API of the application out way too far, opening it up to objects all across the application when there may be no need. This is where the hidden dependencies can come in, things masked behind the use of a single service locator. He recommends solving the issue with more customized locators, as in his example of routing locator used to handle dependencies for a POST HTTP request.

tagged: dependency disguise injection service locator bestpractice solid development

Link: https://thephp.cc/news/2015/09/dependencies-in-disguise

Paul Jones:
Service Classes, Payloads, and Responders
Aug 12, 2015 @ 10:52:27

Paul Jones has written up a post talking about service classes, payloads and responders and how they can help pull logic out of controllers and into more reusable chunks. It's inspired by comments and methods mentioned in another earlier post from Revath Kumar.

Revath Kumar has a good blog post up about extracting domain logic from controllers and putting that logic in a service class. After reading it, I commented that with a little extra work, it would be easy to modify the example to something closer to the Action-Domain-Responder pattern. In doing so, we would get a better separation of concerns (especially in presentation).

Paul applies some of the concepts that Revath outlined to the ADR pattern, suggesting that service classes should always return Payloads and the reduction of functionality in the controller overall. He includes an example of what the resulting code would look like, following along with the "orders" scenario outlined in Revath's post.

tagged: service class payload responder adr action domain responder designpattern

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6172

Revath S Kumar:
PHP : Service classes
Aug 07, 2015 @ 12:08:40

Revath S Kumar has a post to his site that wants to help get you started writing service classes for your application. Service classes are useful when interacting with multiple pieces of data that need either interaction or correlation.

When I started with MVC in PHP, I used to write the whole logic in controller, then when I learned about skinny controllers fat models I reduced the code in controller and moved logic into models. But that was not enough. [...] In order to make this more convenient and reusable I thought of abstracting the logic for creating the order into service classes. I got this idea of service classes from Ruby on Rails. So when I came back to PHP world I thought of using service classes.

He uses examples of service classes he's written for a Yii framework based application, showing a before and after example of his "Orders" controller. He moves most of the logic from the controller (less reusable) into a service class that creates the order record based on the data its been provided. He uses exceptions to handle validation errors, making it simpler in the controller to catch multiple exception types in one place.

tagged: service class introduction yiiframework tutorial orders

Link: http://blog.revathskumar.com/2015/08/php-service-classes.html

Rob Allen:
Accessing services in Slim 3
Jun 23, 2015 @ 10:51:36

Rob Allen has a new post to his site today showing you how to access services in a Slim 3 application using container injection instead of the previous "getInstance" method.

One of the changes between Slim Framework 2 and 3 is that the application singleton has gone. [...] In general, you didn't need access to $app itself, but rather you wanted access to something that the app knows about, such as a database adapter, or the router for access to the urlFor method to create a URL to a route. With Slim 3, there is no getInstance() on App, so you need to inject the instances of whatever you need where ever you need them.

He shows you how to create a simple Slim dependency injection container (service locator?) and push two kinds of objects in for later reuse. He shows how to reference this container from inside of your routes in both the callable/closure and class contexts. He also includes an example of referencing the same container from inside middleware (again in both the closure and class contexts).

tagged: slim microframework framework slim3 service access container this

Link: http://akrabat.com/accessing-services-in-slim-3/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Deploying PHP apps to DigitalOcean with Dploy.io
Jun 22, 2015 @ 12:35:23

On the SitePoint PHP blog today editor Bruno Skvorc shows you how to deploy your PHP applications with Dploy.io, a service that aims to make deploying and hosting your applications simpler.

In this tutorial, we’ll take a look at how to deploy a PHP application with Dploy, a tool that’s free (and full-featured) for a single application, which makes for a perfect test case on whether or not it’s worth paying for. Before continuing, go ahead and sign up for a free account. Specifically, we’ll deploy a simple app I made on DigitalOcean.

He helps you get a Digital Ocean droplet set up with the necessary requirements, the software you'll need to install and the configuration changes to make. He then moves over to Dploy and shows how to set up a basic configuration through their web control panel. This includes the environment, deployment mode and the branch of the repository to pull from. He also includes instructions for setting the correct permissions on the system and how to start the deployment. He shows screenshots of the resulting status update and how to check to be sure everything's working as expected. He ends the post with a quick look at making deployments following this via the special "[deploy]" tag in the commit message.

tagged: deploy application tutorial dployio service digitalocean

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/deploying-php-apps-digitalocean-dploy-io/

Marc Morera:
Lazy Commands in Symfony
May 08, 2015 @ 08:13:22

In the latest post to his site Marc Morera about the use of "lazy services" with Symfony2. In his examples, he uses a command line application to illustrate his point, but it could apply elsewhere as well.

Since Symfony version 2.4 you can define your controllers and commands as services. This is so useful as long as you need to treat your classes as much decoupled as possible. [...] When we define as lazy a service, this is not instanced when is injected, but only when is accessed. [...] The point here is to define our service intended to work with the model as lazy.

He shows how to implement this kind of "lazy" handling in a command, registering the commands into the services but not creating the instances of them until they're used. He includes some example code showing how this is set up and offers a few tips on the implementation and common issues to think about.

tagged: symfony2 command lazy service register tutorial

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2015/05/08/lazy-commands-in-symfony/