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Jonathan Hill:
How much does it cost to be a web developer?
March 14, 2014 @ 11:17:48

Jonathan Hill has taken an interesting perspective in his recent post looking more at some of the average financial costs around being a web developer.

With Software Development topping 2014′s top jobs list, I thought I would share how much it cost me to become a web developer, and what my monthly expenses look like nowadays.

He breaks it down into a few different categories, listing an average price for each:

  • Initial (start-up) costs for hardware and software
  • Training costs
  • Recurring costs

Obviously, not all of the software and tools he lists are needed for every software developer, but it does give some perspective. Thankfully, he also links to some free alternatives to the tools he mentions that can reduce these costs as well.

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cost developer average hardware software service

Link: http://jonathonhill.net/2014-02-19/how-much-does-it-cost-to-be-a-web-developer/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Understanding Symfony Bundle Configuration and Service Container
February 04, 2014 @ 10:46:03

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post today for those that may be new to the Symfony framework or just wanting to get into it and having trouble understanding bundle configuration. In this new post Carl Vuorinen walks you through this process, combining an example bundle with its configuration.

In this post we'll cover different ways on how to configure Bundles in Symfony2 and how the dependency injection container works with the configuration. The Bundle configuration and Symfony dependency injection container (also known as service container) can be difficult concepts to grasp when first starting development with Symfony2, especially if dependency injection is not a familiar concept beforehand. [...] I am used to working with YAML because I think it's more readable than XML, but you do get the benefit of schema validation when using XML.

He briefly introduces the concepts behind "bundles" in Symfony and two ways to create one - either via the generator on the command line or manually. He also shows two ways to get a bundle's configuration loaded. There's the "easy way", configuring it inside the main "confix.yml", or the slightly harder way of adding a configuration file inside the bundle structure itself and using the "get" method to grab the values manually. With the location(s) of the configuration defined, he gets into the contents of the file and its structure. Finally, he shows the complete example, an "ExampleBundle" with a "greet" method that accepts the configuration value from the "cvuorinen_example.greeter" setting.

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symfony bundle configuration container service tutorial introduction

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/understanding-symfony-bundle-configuration-service-container

Paul Jones:
Quicker, Easier, More Seductive Names, Usage, and Intent
December 18, 2013 @ 10:39:05

Paul Jones has updated his "service locators vs dependency injection containers" series with another post to his site today, this time he focuses on implementation not names. He suggests that the difference in naming makes it easy to think they're very different things, so he focuses on implementation rather than just the names.

As the disucussion progressed, it became more clear to me that there really is no significant difference in how Dependency Injection containers and Service Locator containers are written. They are both Inversion of Control (IOC) containers, and are not distinguishable by their code, API, features, etc. (although some may have more or fewer features than others).

As such, the terms Dependency Injection and Service Locator appear to be interchangeable in the sense that a container is a container is a container. The difference in naming comes from how the container is used, not how the container is implemented.

He suggests that one of the main differences is where they are, either inside or outside of a non-Factory object. He circles back around to the names, though, and points out that when developers talk to one another, they need to be speaking the same language. As such, he tries to set this vocabulary for the implementations, separati

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dependency injection service locator implementation naming

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/5853

Paul Jones:
Quicker, Easier, More Seductive How To Tell A DI Container From A Service Locator
December 17, 2013 @ 13:55:11

Paul Jones has continued his posts about dependency injection containers versus service locators in his site with this new post that hopes to make it easier for you to tell the difference between the two.

It is easy to confuse a Dependency Injection container with a Service Locator. They are very similar to each other. The differences are subtle. Indeed, it's even possible to use a Dependency Injection container as a Service Locator, although I think it's difficult to use a Service Locator as a Dependency Injection container. They are both sub-patterns of a more generic pattern called Inversion of Control, and some people confuse the term Dependency Injection with the more generic term Inversion of Control.

He starts off with a few questions you can ask to see which camp the implementation belongs in, mostly revolving around how the objects are fetched. He includes some code samples to help reinforce the point, showing both a service locator and DIC. He's also done some looking around at some of the major DIC implementations and which of the two he sees them as (with a few notes explaining his thoughts).

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service locator dependency injection compare inversionofcontrol

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/5843

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Translation and Text-to-Speech with Microsoft Translator
December 05, 2013 @ 09:19:29

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a new tutorial showing you how to combine the Microsoft Azure platform services with their Translator API to create a text-to-speech translation service with some simple curl calls.

Text to speech is a popular technique used by many websites to provide their content in an interactive way. The generation of artificial human voice is known as Speech Synthesis. Even though it's highly popular, there are very few speech synthesis services, especially when looking for those free of charge. Microsoft Translator is one of the services we can use to get a speech service with limited features. In this tutorial, we are going to look at how we can use Microsoft Translator API to translate content and then make audio files using said content.

He walks you through setting up an Azure application (you'll need an account for the marketplace already) and how to subscribe to the translation service. It's a paid service but there's a "try before you buy" level that allows 2,000,000 characters of translation before it's cut off - perfect for testing. He includes the PHP to make the requests to the Translation API via curl. Included is code to initialize the configuration for the request, get the correct tokens and a reusable method for making the actual translation request. Finally, an example of doing the actual text-to-speech conversion is shown, resulting in an mp3 file.

He also includes an example of a simple frontend UI. You can see a working demo of the script here.

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microsoft translator api texttospeech text speech tutorial azure service

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/translation-text-speech-microsoft-translator/

Symfony Blog:
Symfony 2.3.0, the first LTS, is now available
June 05, 2013 @ 11:25:14

As is mentioned in this new post to the Symfony blog, the latest milestone release of the popular framework has been made - Symfony 2.3.0.

We were all waiting for it and many of us have been working hard for the last four years to make it happen. Today, Symfony 2.3.0 is available and this is the first long-term support release for Symfony version 2. I'm so happy that we were able to achieve this important milestone in the life of the framework. THANK YOU for making it possible. [...] That gives us the best of two different worlds: small teams and agile companies can benefit from the latest features by upgrading every six months (they have two months to upgrade); large teams and traditional companies can standardize on a release. [...] And 2.3.0 is our first long term support release. We, the community, are going to maintain it for the next three years (until May 2016).

The post includes some statistics about this latest release as well as some of the new features that come along with it. For those that want to upgrade right away, there's also some instructions on what to change in your "composer.json" file to try it all out.

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symfony2 tls service release features availability

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/symfony-2-3-0-the-first-lts-is-now-available

Rob Allen:
Simple logging of ZF2 exceptions
April 25, 2013 @ 10:31:40

In this new post to his site Rob Allen shows you how to implement a simple logging method for catching exceptions in your Zend Framework 2 application.

I recently had a problem with a ZF2 based website where users were reporting seeing the error page displayed, but I couldn't reproduce in testing. To find this problem I decided to log every exception to a file so I could then go back and work out what was happening. In a standard ZF2 application, the easiest way to do this is to add a listener to the 'dispatch.error' event and log using ZendLog.

He uses an event listener to attach a service that contains a "logException" method. This method uses the ZendLog component to write out the error message to a local log file including a backtrace of where the issue occurred.

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simple logging exception handling service event listener tutorial

Link: http://akrabat.com/zend-framework-2/simple-logging-of-zf2-exceptions

Reddit.com:
Dependency injection in ZF2 and Symfony 2 are service locators
April 16, 2013 @ 12:40:07

On Reddit's PHP section there's a discussion happening about dependency injection versus service locators in two popular PHP frameworks - Zend Framework 2 and Symfony 2 (and how they're not really DI at all).

Both ZF2 and Symfony 2 offer the same behavior: if I'm in a controller, and I want to use a service, I have to get it from the container with $this->get('my_service'). As such, the controller is not using DI, this is the service locator pattern. Controllers become more difficult to tests because of that, and they depend on the container now. I wonder why both frameworks didn't go further: why not treat controllers like services and use dependency injection on them. In other words: if a controller needs a service "A", then it should get it in the constructor, or through setter/property injection.

The comments talk some about the "controller from the DI container" idea, some other ways around the problem and some clarification as to what the frameworks are actually doing related to the container injection.

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dependency injection service locator controller framework zendframework2 symfony2

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/1caidn/dependency_injection_in_zf2_and_symfony_2_are

Rob Allen:
Objects in the model layer Part 2
April 02, 2013 @ 11:55:50

Rob Allen previously posted about some of his practices around the different types of objects in the model layer of his Zend Framework 2 applications. In this latest post he follows up and shares some example code for the different types.

I previously talked about the terms I use for objects in the model layer and now it's time to put some code on those bones. Note that,as always, all code here is example code and not production-ready.

He includes sample classes related to his "books" examples - a "book" entity (with title, author, id and ISBN), a mapper object to load/save/delete the entity and a service object that provides an interface for the entity to the rest of the application.

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object model layer entity mapper service interface book


Rob Allen:
Objects in the model layer
March 22, 2013 @ 10:45:54

In this latest post to his site Rob Allen talks some about application structure and the different kinds of objects he uses in his applications.

I currently use a very simple set of core objects within my model layer: entities, mappers and service objects. [...] I dislike the phrase "service object" as the word "service" means so many things to so many people. I haven't heard a better phrase yet that everyone understands though.

He defines each of the types of objects to help make the separation clearer. Here they are in brief:

  • Entities are objects that represent something in my business logic.
  • Mappers know how to save and load an entity from the data store.
  • Service objects provide the API that the rest of the application uses.

Some of the comments on the post relate his choices to use in Zend Framework v2-based applications, noting that there are some base components you can extend to create these kinds of objects.

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object model entity mapper service oop structure znedframework2



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