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SitePoint PHP Blog:
An in-Depth Walkthrough of Supercharging Apps with Blackfire
Jan 14, 2016 @ 11:30:32

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial posted by Reza Lavaryan showing you how to "supercharge your applications" with the help of the Blackfire.io profiling service.

With profiling, we can spot the performance bottlenecks in the code and do something about them. There is a variety of profiling tools out there, each taking a different approach. [...] With profiling, we can spot the performance bottlenecks in the code and do something about them. There is a variety of profiling tools out there, each taking a different approach. [...] Blackfire.io is the new generation of web profilers, which takes the automatic instrumentation approach, but without imposing a performance impact on our application.

First he defines some of the basic terms it's helpful to know when profiling and using Blackfire. He then walks you through getting what you'll need set up:

  • a Homestead VM instance with the necessary configuration options
  • a script using Faker to generate and write user data to a local database

He then shows you how to execute the first profiling run and what the results look like in the Blackfire views. He uses these results to make some modifications to the script and re-runs the tests to see what kind of gains it provides. Most of his examples use the web interface for the service but the post ends with a look at using the command line tool and getting back some simple metrics as a result.

tagged: profiling performance evaluate blackfireio service introduction faker

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/an-in-depth-walkthrough-of-supercharging-apps-with-blackfire/

Laravel News:
Automatically upgrade your Laravel app with Shift
Jan 06, 2016 @ 10:24:52

On the Laravel News site they've posted an interview with Jason McCreary, the lead developer behind the Laravel Shift service, a product that helps you keep your Laravel applications up to date with the latest versions of the framework.

Laravel Shift is a new project aimed at automatically upgrading out of date Laravel apps up to the current version. The way it works is you sign-in with either Github or BitBucket, purchase a shift (an upgrade package), and then review the pull request it automatically creates.

I had a chance to speak with Jason, the lead developer on the project and what follows is a Q&A about Shift.

They talk about where the idea for Laravel Shift came from originally and how the upgrade process happens (hint: it's automated). Jason also answers questions about what kinds of applications it will work on and how it's handled if there's an application that can't be upgraded. He also mentions the process for upgrading from a very old version, noting that it would be required to "shift" multiple times to achieve the correct results.

tagged: laravel shift service upgrade automatic application laravelnews

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/01/automatically-upgrade-your-laravel-app-with-shift/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introducing Bugsnag – the Last Error Monitor You’ll Need
Jan 05, 2016 @ 11:12:53

The SitePoint PHP blog there's a tutorial posted showing you how to integrate your application with Bugsnag, the "last error monitor you'll need". Bugsnag is an external service that provides you more insight into the errors in your application and statistics around them.

The pursuit of building an error-free application continues. But in the meanwhile, we need to monitor our application’s errors and take action quickly. Many companies have tried to solve this problem, and one of the best on the market right now is Bugsnag. [...] In this article, we’re going to discover Bugsnag and integrate it into an existing Laravel application. You can clone the demo app from Github to follow along.

The article walks you through the setup of the demo application (cloned from GitHub) and the creation of a Bugsnag account with a 30 day free trial. It then shows how to integrate the PHP notifier package into your application, though the sample application is Laravel-based so they show how to use this package in the examples. From there they show how to provide your credentials, set up the environment for the app (ex: production, development, etc) and methods for sending various messages types and content over to the service. The post then looks at the Bugsnag dashboard, giving a brief overview of how it looks and what features it includes.

tagged: bugsnag tutorial integration laravel error monitoring service thirdparty

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/laravel-with-bugsnag-the-last-error-monitor-youll-need/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Easy Continuous Delivery with ContinuousPHP and Zend Server
Dec 10, 2015 @ 12:54:32

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial from author Daniel Berman showing you how to combine the ContinuousPHP service with Zend Server to create a continuous deployment system for your PHP applications.

The continuous delivery approach aims at making the process of continuously deploying code to production error-free, or at least less error-prone, using automated tasks, tests, builds and deployments. Minimize risk and downtime, maximize quality and value. That’s the motto.

However, this process is not always straightforward, to say the least. Often enough, the continuous delivery tools chosen for implementing continuous integration and deployment are hard to figure out and use, and are usually time consuming and expensive. The bigger the application, the bigger the challenge. This article introduces an interesting new approach to dealing with this challenge by demonstrating a continuous delivery process using continuousphp and Zend Server.

They briefly walk you through some of the prerequisites including an installation of Zend Server already set up and waiting. He also provides a skeleton application you can use if you just want to test it out first. From there he goes through the steps in the process:

  • Setting up your repository (on ContinuousPHP)
  • Creating a new deployment pipeline
  • Configuring build and test settings
  • Packaging and deploying your app

All along the way he's included screenshots of the ContinuousPHP interface so you can be sure you're still on the right track. He ends the post with a few extra "goodies" linking directly to the ContinuousPHP and Zend server documentation among other useful links.

tagged: zendserver tutorial continuousphp service setup configure continuous deployment

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/easy-continuous-delivery-with-continuousphp-and-zend-server/

Master Zend Framework:
How to Test Zend Framework Applications with Codeception - Part Two
Oct 26, 2015 @ 09:31:13

The Master Zend Framework site has posted the second part of their tutorial series showing how to test Zend Framework applications with CodeCeption, a tool allowing for behavior-driven testing methods on PHP applications. In part two of the series they finish up the examples from part one and put them to use.

In part one of this series on testing Zend Framework applications with Codeception, we covered what Codeception is, how to install and configure it, and how to enable and configure the Zend Framework 2 module; finishing up by writing some basic acceptance and functional tests. [...] Here, in part two of the series we see how to retrieve and test registered services using BDD-style testing. This isn't going to be an exhaustive look at every possibility of what's available. Instead, what I'm going to do is show a simple set of examples which use two extra modules which come with Codeception and how they enable descriptive, BDD-style, tests.

The tutorial starts by getting into a bit more detail on what BDD-style testing is and some of the basic terminology. They help you install two modules to help make writing your tests simpler. The tutorial walks you through generating a new test for a fictional "Video" table gateway class and how to flesh it out to pull the service from the service manager, configure the database connection and write a few checks to verify the type of the service fetched and the number of records it returns.

tagged: zendframework2 service test bdd behavior codeception series part2 tutorial testing

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/testing-with-codeception-part-two/

Symfony Blog:
Paving the way for Symfony 3 with the "Deprecation Detector" tool
Oct 22, 2015 @ 10:48:31

On the Symfony blog there's a post talking about a tool they've introduced that is helping to "pave the way" for the upcoming version 3 release of the Symfony framework - the Deprecation Detector tool.

Symfony 3 will be released at the end of November 2015. Learning from our own history, the transition from Symfony 2 to 3 will be much more pleasant than the transition from symfony 1 to 2 that happened in July 2011.

Technically speaking, Symfony 3 includes no new features comparing it with Symfony 2.8, which will be released at the same time. [...] This means that your Symfony applications won't work on Symfony 3 unless you remove all their deprecations. In order to simplify the task of finding which deprecations affect your applications, a new tool called Deprecation Detector has just been released.

The tool runs static analysis against your codebase and finds locations where you're using deprecated methods/classes/interfaces/etc and reports them back for fixing. The post includes the commands you'll need to get the tool installed and how to run it against your code. You can find out more about the project and get details on command line options on its GitHub repository.

tagged: deprecation detector symfony2 symfony3 method interface class service tool tutorial

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/paving-the-way-for-symfony-3-with-the-deprecation-detector-tool

Gonzalo Ayuso:
Alternative way to inject providers in a Silex application
Oct 19, 2015 @ 11:18:10

Gonazalo Ayuso has shared a method he's found for injecting providers into Silex that replaces accessing the dependency injection container as an array. It instead replaces it and allows defining function parameters instead.

I normally use Silex when I need to build one Backend. It’s simple and straightforward to build one API endpoint using this micro framework. But there’s something that I don’t like it: The “array access” way to access to the dependency injection container. I need to remember what kind of object provides my service provider and also my IDE doesn’t help me with autocompletion. OK I can use PHPDoc comments or even create one class that inherits from SilexApplication and use Traits. Normally I’m lazy to do it. Because of that I’ve create this simple service provider to help me to do what I’m looking for. Let me explain it a little bit.

He includes examples of both the normal way you can access Silex's injection containers (the "array access" method) and contrasts this with his updated method, via a method parameter on the route closure. His service provider (complete code in the post and on github), when registered, looks for controller events and performs reflection on the closure to detect which objects need to be injected. The method is then called normally but with the extra attributes set, populating the parameters.

tagged: slex service provider alternative array access parameter method dependency injection

Link: http://gonzalo123.com/2015/10/19/alternative-way-to-inject-providers-in-a-silex-application/

/Dev/Hell Podcast:
Episode 66: Aquinas on Customer Service
Oct 09, 2015 @ 11:57:23

The /Dev/Hell podcast, with hosts and PHP community members Chris Hartjes and Ed Finkler, has posted their latest episode - Episode 66: Aquinas on Customer Service

Episode 66 was recorded live right after the inaugural Pacific Northwest PHP Conference. We make fun of our sponsors, talk about smelly tests, Thomas Aquinas, remote pairing with juniors, and new stuff happening with OSMI.

Topics mentioned in this episode include the PNWPHP conference, Sara Golemon, Smelly Tests and The Last Starfighter. You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. Also be sure to subscribe to their feed or mailing list to get notified when new episodes are released.

tagged: devhell podcast ep66 aquinas customer service edfinkler chrishartjes

Link: http://devhell.info/post/2015-10-07/aquinas-on-customer-service/

ThePHP.cc:
Dependencies in Disguise
Sep 28, 2015 @ 08:48:27

On the PHP.cc's site has an article that looks at dependencies in disguise based on a "workshop" one of their members, Stefan Priebsch, gave at the recent Bulgaria PHP Conference.

Yesterday I gave a presentation at the [Bulgaria PHP Conference](https://thephp.cc/dates/2015/09/bulgaria-php-conference) (a great event, by the way). Following an [ad-hoc workshop](https://twitter.com/s_bergmann/status/647732967087939584) that I gave as part of the hallway track and an entertaining hackathon, I decided it was too late to join the party and went back to the hotel with some other speakers. Checking out how the day was reflected in social media, I contributed a few more tweets to a [conversation](https://twitter.com/tim_bezhashvyly/status/647861115721003008) that had started earlier in the day ([here](https://thephp.cc/dates/2015/09/bulgaria-php-conference/solid-mvc) are the slides of my talk that people are referring to). I am writing this to clarify my point, and help everybody to understand better.

He talks about dependency injection as a best practice that's followed in libraries all over the PHP ecosystem, making it easier to work with objects and their needs. Sometimes this means using a dependency injection container and others it's just constructor/method injection. He talks about how these objects are build in factory methods and recommends making one factory but points out that this only really works when all the objects you need are known up front. However, he gives several (code) examples of places where this could be difficult and how some are using service locators to solve the problem. He points out, however, that this then expands the API of the application out way too far, opening it up to objects all across the application when there may be no need. This is where the hidden dependencies can come in, things masked behind the use of a single service locator. He recommends solving the issue with more customized locators, as in his example of routing locator used to handle dependencies for a POST HTTP request.

tagged: dependency disguise injection service locator bestpractice solid development

Link: https://thephp.cc/news/2015/09/dependencies-in-disguise

Paul Jones:
Service Classes, Payloads, and Responders
Aug 12, 2015 @ 10:52:27

Paul Jones has written up a post talking about service classes, payloads and responders and how they can help pull logic out of controllers and into more reusable chunks. It's inspired by comments and methods mentioned in another earlier post from Revath Kumar.

Revath Kumar has a good blog post up about extracting domain logic from controllers and putting that logic in a service class. After reading it, I commented that with a little extra work, it would be easy to modify the example to something closer to the Action-Domain-Responder pattern. In doing so, we would get a better separation of concerns (especially in presentation).

Paul applies some of the concepts that Revath outlined to the ADR pattern, suggesting that service classes should always return Payloads and the reduction of functionality in the controller overall. He includes an example of what the resulting code would look like, following along with the "orders" scenario outlined in Revath's post.

tagged: service class payload responder adr action domain responder designpattern

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6172