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Kinsta.com Blog:
What’s New in PHP 7.1.0
Nov 25, 2016 @ 13:32:29

On the Kinsta blog there's a post detailing some of the new features that are coming in the next release in the PHP 7 series - PHP 7.10.

The newest version of PHP – 7.1.0 – is already at RC6 (Release Candidate 6) status, which means it will be out soon. After a huge update that took PHP from 5.6 straight to 7.0 increasing speeds considerably, PHP is now focusing on core language features that will help all of us write better code. In this article I’ll take a look at the major additions and features of PHP 7.1.0 which is just around the bend.

Their list of items includes:

  • nullable types
  • iterable and void returns
  • the use of keys in lists
  • number operators and malformed numbers

Each item in the list includes a brief description and some example code show the feature in use where it makes sense. If you're not overly familiar with what's coming in PHP 7.1 this is a great guide.

tagged: kinsta php71 upcoming version feature php71rc6 release detail

Link: https://kinsta.com/blog/php-7-1-0/

Kyle Mitchell:
The MIT License, Line by Line
Sep 27, 2016 @ 09:53:11

If you've been working with open source software for any amount of time, chances are you've seen licenses attached to the projects you've used (or even contributed to). There's quite a few of them out there and it can be confusing as to what's actually covered by them and how it effects you directly. In this recent post to Kyle E. Mitchell's site he explains, line-by-line, one of the most common Open Source licenses: the MIT license.

The MIT License is the most popular open-source software license. Here’s one read of it, line by line.

If you’re involved in open-source software and haven’t taken the time to read the license from top to bottom—it’s only 171 words—you need to do so now. Especially if licenses aren’t your day-to-day. Make a mental note of anything that seems off or unclear, and keep trucking. I’ll repeat every word again, in chunks and in order, with context and commentary. But it’s important to have the whole in mind.

He then walks you through the different sections of the license, explaining what it all means:

  • License title (header)
  • Copyright notice (header)
  • Grant scope (license grant)
  • Conditions (license grant)
  • Attribution notice, warranty disclaimer and limitation of liability

There's a lot of detail here but in the end you'll definitely understand the license in and out. He ends the post with links to a few other resources that have helped him better understand source licenses.

tagged: mit license opensource detail linebyline explanation

Link: https://writing.kemitchell.com/2016/09/21/MIT-License-Line-by-Line.html

Ibuildings Blog:
Programming Guidelines - Part 3: The Life and Death of Objects
Feb 02, 2016 @ 11:42:05

The Ibuildings blog has posted the latest part of their series looking at some general programming guidelines and principles that can help you in your own development work. In this latest article Matthias Noback talks about the "life and death of objects" in more detail including creating, updating and how they "die".

In the first part of this series we looked at ways to reduce the complexity of function bodies. The second part covered several strategies for reducing complexity even more, by getting rid of null in our code. In this article we'll zoom out a bit and look at how to properly organize the lifecycle of our objects, from creating them to changing them, letting them pass away and bringing them back from the dead.

He starts with a brief list of things that are true about objects (they live in memory, they hide implementation, etc) and some of the issues with poor object handling. He then gets into some of the basics: creating objects (meaningful & different ways), validating the input to constructors and methods and changing them to update properties and related objects. He also suggests preferring immutable objects and talks about value objects to help towards this goal. Finally he talks about the death of objects and some of the ways you can possibly "bring them back to life".

tagged: oop object detail introduction validate immutable valueobject revive lifecycle tutorial

Link: https://www.ibuildings.nl/blog/2016/02/programming-guidelines-part-3-the-life-and-death-objects

Julien Pauli:
Zoom on PHP objects and classes
Mar 26, 2015 @ 12:50:49

Julien Pauli has a recent post to his site that "zooms in" on objects and classes with a look behind the scenes at how they're handled in the PHP source (at the C level) with plenty of code examples and explanations as to how they work.

Everybody uses objects nowadays. Something that was not that easy to bet on when PHP5 got released 10 years ago (2005). I still remember this day, I wasn't involved in internals code yet, so I didn't know much things about how all this big machine could work. But I had to note at this time, when using this new release of the language, that jumps had been made compared to old PHP4. The major point advanced for PHP5 adoption was : "it has a new very powerful object model". That wasn't lies. [...] Here, I will show you as usual how all this stuff works internally. The goal is always the same : you understand and master what happens in the low level, to make a better usage of the language everyday.

The article does a great (if lengthy) job of covering everything that happens with PHP's objects and class system, including stats about memory consumption. He includes both the PHP code and the C code to illustrate what's happening with classes, interfaces, traits and object methods/attributes (including object references). He also talks about what "$this" is and how class destructors are handled.

tagged: object class behindthescenes detail c code memory usage

Link: http://jpauli.github.io/2015/03/24/zoom-on-php-objects.html

Anthony Ferrara:
What About Garbage?
Dec 03, 2014 @ 13:33:44

In his latest post Anthony Ferrara looks at a recent change in the Composer dependency management tool involving a major speed boost, just from disabling the garbage collection.

If you've been following the news, you'll have noticed that yesterday Composer got a bit of a speed boost. And by "bit of a speed boost", we're talking between 50% and 90% speed increase depending on the complexity of the dependencies. But how did the fix work? And should you make the same sort of change to your projects? For those of you who want the TL/DR answer: the answer is no you shouldn't.

He talks about what the actual (one line) change was that sped things up but goes on to talk about why doing this isn't necessarily a good thing. He covers how PHP handles variables internally, how it relates to "pointers" and the copy-on-write functionality. He includes code snippets and gives an overview of how each would be handled by the interpreter. Unfortunately, the way PHP handles things, deleting a variable only removes variable reference, not the value, but does decrement the reference count for it. When that hits 0, garbage collection kicks in and removes associated values too.

He talks about a few other kinds of garbage collection (the reference count method is just one of them) and circles back around to how this relates to Composer's functionality. He points out the number of objects created during the dependency resolution process and what can happen when the root buffer, populated with all of these objects, gets too full (hint: garbage collection). He finishes the post talking about how, in Composer's case, the garbage collection change yielded the performance impact it did, but doesn't suggest it for every project. He also makes a few suggestions as to things that could be done to improve PHP's garbage collection handling.

tagged: garbage collection handling composer disable detail

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/12/what-about-garbage.html

NetTuts.com:
Digging in to Laravel's IoC Container
Nov 25, 2014 @ 12:23:07

NetTuts.com has a new tutorial posted that digs into the Laravel IoC (Inversion of Control) container, one of the key features of the framework making it easy to create and use objects all around your applications.

Inversion of Control, or IoC, is a technique that allows control to be inverted when compared to classical procedural code. The most prominent form of IoC is, of course, Dependency Injection, or DI. Laravel's IoC container is one of the most used Laravel features, yet is probably the least understood.

He starts with an example of basic dependency injection (constructor injection) and how this relates to the Laravel framework's IoC handling (hint: it's all IoC). He includes examples of some built-in Laravel bindings and talks about the difference between shared and non-shared bindings. He also looks at conditional binding, how dependencies are resolved and how you can define your own custom binding implementations. Other topics mentioned include tagging, rebounds, rebinding and extending. He ends the article with a look at how you can use the IoC outside of Laravel too.

tagged: laravel ioc container inversionofcontrol framework tutorial introduction detail

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/digging-in-to-laravels-ioc-container--cms-22167

Anthony Ferrara:
A Lesson In Security
Nov 03, 2014 @ 09:11:49

In his most recent post Anthony Ferrara gives a lesson in security prompted by the recent major issue with a SQL injection vulnerability in Drupal. He gets into detail about the vulnerability itself and the ultimate question: "how could this happen?"

Recently, a severe SQL Injection vulnerability was found in Drupal 7. It was fixed immediately (and correctly), but there was a problem. Attackers made automated scripts to attack unpatched sites. Within hours of the release of the vulnerability fix, sites were being compromised. And when I say compromised, I'm talking remote code execution, backdoors, the lot. Why? Like any attack, it's a chain of issues, that independently aren't as bad, but add up to bad news. Let's talk about them: What went wrong? What went right? And what could have happened better? There's a lesson that every developer needs to learn in here.

He details (complete with code examples) where the vulnerability was, how it could be exploited and what the resulting SQL would look like when it was abused. Fortunately, the fix for the issue was relatively simple, but fixing is easy - distributing that fix is much more difficult.

How did this happen? Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone. It's going to happen sooner or later. Heck, this vulnerable code was in the database layer since 2008, and was just discovered two weeks ago. That says something about how complex vulnerabilities can be.

He suggests that the bigger lesson here isn't about who made the mistake or even the code that caused it. It's more about how it was handled, and that, in using any kind of CMS/framework like this there's always risk. People are human, people make mistakes - "the key is how you deal with it".

tagged: security drupal vulnerability detail lesson risk handle

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/10/a-lesson-in-security.html

Anthony Ferrara:
A Followup To An Open Letter To PHP-FIG
Oct 17, 2014 @ 11:51:35

Based on some of the responses to his previous open letter to the PHP-FIG (Framework Interoperability Group), Anthony Ferrara has posted a follow-up explaining some of his points made and the caching proposal in a bit more detail.

A few days ago, I wrote An Open Letter to PHP-FIG. Largely the feedback on it was positive, but not all. So I feel like I do have a few more things to say. What follows is a collection of followups to specific points of contention raised about my post. I'm going to ignore the politics and any non-technical discussion here.

He points out that while the previous post wasn't completely about the cache proposal (it was used as a "literary device") there was some confusion on it. He walks through the "unnecessary complexity" he sees with it, citing code examples, and makes points about performance, memory usage handling stampede protection and the creation of standard ways to avoid it. He ends the post with a look at group invalidation handling and two ways it could be accomplished, either via namespacing or through tagging the items and using that as a reference point for the invalidation.

tagged: open letter phpfig cache proposal detail opinion problem

Link: http://blog.ircmaxell.com/2014/10/a-followup-to-open-letter-to-php-fig.html

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Continuous Deployment Revisited
Sep 19, 2013 @ 12:52:50

On the SitePoint PHP blog today David Shirley has a new tutorial looking at continuous deployment with a bit more detail than his previous post.

In an earlier article I talked about what Continuous Deployment was and how it fits into the modern programming process. We took a small swipe at how it works, but some people (okay, one person) felt that I could have gone into more detail and they were right. [...] The essence of Continuous Deployment is that you use automated tools to do a lot of the heavy lifting. This means there may or may not be a bit of a learning curve when you first get started. A number of software elements are brought into play, and if you already know how to use those, great. If you don’t, just remember that this is a learning curve, not a barrier.

He's broken down the rest of the tutorial into sections relating to the different pieces needed to effectively set up a continuous deployment (CD) system:

  • Effective use of version control
  • Commitment to automated testing
  • Setup and use of automated build software
tagged: continuous deployment series detail versioncontrol testing build software

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/continuous-deployment-revisited

Sherif Ramadan:
PHP OOP: Objects Under The Hood
Dec 04, 2012 @ 09:15:27

In another of his series looking "under the covers" at what actually happens in the PHP language during its use, Sharif Ramadan has posted this look at the object handling in PHP's OOP functionality.

I would love to take a good long look under the hood at just how PHP objects and classes do the work that they do, and hope that you could benefit from that knowledge. [There are] many questions that come across my desk, on a regular basis, from developers and beginner PHP enthusiasts that I’ve worked with over the years, and are some of the key points this article attempts to help you answer.

He talks about classes "giving birth" to objects, how they're stored internal to PHP and how they provide the "blueprints" for it to lay out the storage of the object's data. He talks about using identifiers for variable/property access, object handlers and how "$this" fits into all of it. He notes that OOP, while a major part of PHP now, wasn't in the initial versions (until around PHP4). He finishes off the post talking about lateral/vertical context switching, the lifecycle of an object and the "early binding problem" and class scope.

tagged: oop language class object detail lowlevel behindthescenes

Link: