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Mark Baker:
Closures, Anonymous Classes and an alternative approach to Test Mocking (Part 3)
Sep 19, 2017 @ 11:58:39

Mark Baker has posted the third part of his series looking at an alternative way to handle mocking in the tests for your PHP application. In this latest part of the series he shows how to modify one of PHPUnit's own mocking examples to use an anonymous class.

I have heard people say that you shouldn’t test abstract classes or traits, only the concrete classes that implement or use them. I don’t follow that approach: unit testing is all about testing in isolation from anything that might affect those tests. Testing a concrete class that implements an abstract one, or uses a trait, means that the abstract class or trait is no longer fully isolated, but is being tested within the scope of the whole of that concrete class. We should still always test concrete classes as well; but we should also test the abstract classes and traits as individual units.

So just how do we test something that cannot be instantiated on its own?

He shares one tactic that some developers use - a class designed only for testing - but suggests that this "pollutes" the codebase. Instead he shows how to replace mocking for traits and abstract classes with an anonymous class that's more "disposable". He also shows how to modify this approach to handle calling protected methods in the class the anonymous class extends.

tagged: closure anonymous class alternative mock tutorial part3 series

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2017/09/18/closures-anonymous-classes-and-an-alternative-approach-to-test-mocking-part-3/

Sammy Kaye Powers:
Writing tests for PHP source (Series)
Jul 21, 2017 @ 11:21:48

Sammy Kaye Powers has a series of posts over on his site introducing you to testing the PHP language with .phpt tests. So far he's introduced the topic, shown how to run the tests and debugging failing tests.

If you've ever wanted to get involved with PHP internals, writing tests is a great way to get your foot into the door. The tests are written in PHP so you don't even need to know C to get started.

Each of the posts also comes with a screencast, narrated by Sammy, showing the information presented in the tutorial:

There's more to come in the series as he still plans to teach about how to fix current tests and how to eventually create your own. Stay tuned to his site for more tutorials in the series.

tagged: test unittest phpt language source series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://www.sammyk.me/compiling-php-from-source-writing-tests-for-php-source

TutsPlus.com:
Dynamic Page Templates in WordPress, Part 3
Jun 19, 2017 @ 10:45:04

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the third part of their "Dynamic Page Templates in WordPress" tutorial series today. In this latest article author David Gwyer finishes off the series using all that they've shared from part one and part two to create two examples.

In the first two parts of this tutorial series, we covered what dynamic page templates were and why they were needed. We also looked at the code required to implement them.

In this third and final tutorial in the series, I'll be creating two examples of fully working dynamic page templates you can use in your own projects. These were specifically chosen to be easily extendable to suit your own needs, and are intended as inspiration for any other type of dynamic page templates you can think of.

He then walks you through the creation of the two page templates: a Simple Contact Form and a Blog Post Archive. The first allows you to dynamically control the form elements for a UI interface (rather than code) and the second uses dynamic data to display the list of previous blog posts. The tutorial then finishes with a look at how, since WordPress 4.7, you can use dynamic page templates with any kind of post, not just pages.

tagged: wordpress series part3 dynamic page template blog archive simple form tutorial

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/dynamic-page-templates-in-wordpress-part-3--cms-28514

Delicious Brains Blog:
Automating Local WordPress Site Setup with Scripts Part 3: Automating the Res
Feb 22, 2017 @ 10:36:38

The Delicious Brains site has posted a new tutorial, the third part in their "Automating Local WordPress Setup" series, covering the automation of "the rest" of the setup steps. This includes virtual host setup, plugin installation and cleanup.

In my last post in the Automating Local WordPress Setup series, I created a WP-CLI package for quickly installing and uninstalling WordPress. I’ve been using this package for a while now, and have been itching to make it more useful for a typical development workflow.

[...] I also still catch myself doing things that I know should be automated. Things like deleting unnecessary data, removing the default themes/plugins, and installing new plugins, are things that can be automated to make development easier. In this post we’re going to take a look at some ways to make all that possible.

The article is then broken down into three sections with scripts/code that can help with these automations:

  • Working with Virtual Hosts (and MAMP)
  • Cleaning Up the Install (deleting extra themes, plugins, etc)
  • Installing Frequently Used Plugins (your custom list based on a "plugin list" file

The post finishes out with a screencast showing this plugin installation that makes it easier to come up with easy to reproduce, simple to spin up WordPress environments.

tagged: tutorial automation wordpress part3 virtualhost cleanup plugins installation

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/automating-local-wordpress-site-setup-scripts-part-3-automating-rest/

Delicious Brains Blog:
Scaling Laravel Using AWS Elastic Beanstalk Part 3: Setting up Elastic Beanst
Feb 07, 2017 @ 10:29:41

The Delicious Brains blog has posted the third part of their series covering the scaling of Laravel with AWS Beanstalk. In this latest article the walk through the setup of the Elastic Beanstalk application.

In my last article we set up the supporting services we would require for our Laravel app once we deploy it to the Elastic Beanstalk architecture. We created a VPC to keep our infrastructure secure, we created a MySQL database in RDS, and we set up ElastiCache for our Redis cache. So now that our Laravel app is decoupled and our supporting services are in place, it’s finally time to deploy our app to Elastic Beanstalk.

They start by talking about the Elastic Beanstalk environments and helping you get the application set up via the command line tool. Next up is the creation of the ebextensions directory and the matching YAML configurations for the EB settings. They provide an example of the contents` and explain what some of the configuration sets up. Finally they use the command line tool to issue the "create" command and build out the environment based on the configuration. The post wraps up with a bit about some configuration tweaks that could be made and optionally enabling HTTPS.

tagged: tutorial elastic beanstalk tutorial series part3 setup environment commandline

Link: https://deliciousbrains.com/scaling-laravel-using-aws-elastic-beanstalk-part-3-setting-elastic-beanstalk/

Mattias Noback:
Containerizing a static website with Docker, part III
Jan 09, 2017 @ 11:48:46

Matthias Noback has posted the third part of his "containerizing a static website with Docker" service, continuing on from his previous two posts to look at deploying the environment he's created.

In the previous posts we looked at creating a build container, and after that we created a blog container, serving our generated static website.

It's quite surprising to me how simple the current setup is — admittedly, it's a simple application too. It takes about 50 lines of configuration to get everything up and running.

The idea of the blog container, which has nginx as its main process, is to deploy it to a production server whenever we feel like it, in just "one click". There should be no need to configure a server to host our website, and it should not be necessary to build the application on the server too. This is in fact the promise, and the true power of Docker.

He then gets into the two remaining steps in the process resulting in the deployment of the simple application: pushing to Docker Hub and deploying out to a DigitalOcean server. He includes all of the commands and configuration you'll need to get the process set up and work with the remote machine.

tagged: docker series container part3 deploy dockerhub digitalocean

Link: https://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2017/01/containerizing-a-static-website-with-docker-part-iii/

TutsPlus.com:
Object-Oriented Autoloading in WordPress, Part 3
Dec 01, 2016 @ 11:15:35

TutsPlus.com has continued their series covering object-oriented development practices in WordPress (plugins) with this third tutorial. In previous parts they set up the environment and introduced some of the basic concepts of OOP programming and getting the first classes and files defined.

In the last tutorial, we reviewed the original state of our autoloader and then went through a process of object-oriented analysis and design. The purpose of doing this is so that we can tie together everything that we've covered in this series and the introductory series.

Secondly, the purpose of doing this in its own tutorial is so we can spend the rest of this time walking through our class, seeing how each part fits together, implementing it in our plugin, and then seeing how applying object-oriented programming and the single responsibility principle can lead to a more focused, maintainable solution.

They start with a brief review of what they've covered so far and begin to build on the changes suggested in the previous part of the series. They've already broken it down into the different functional classes (according to the single-responsibility principle) and take the next step of including them and calling some example code to prove all is working as expected.

tagged: oop wordpress tutorial series objectoriented programming plugin part3

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/object-oriented-autoloading-in-wordpress-part-3--cms-27515

TutsPlus.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 3
Nov 15, 2016 @ 10:23:30

On the TutsPlus.com site they've continued their WordPress series showing you how to integrate class autoloading into your plugin development.

In this tutorial, we're going to take a break from writing code and look at what PHP namespaces and autoloaders are, how they work, and why they are beneficial. Then we'll prepare to wrap up this series by implementing them in code.

In the previous part of the series they built up the environment and some of the basic structure of the plugin (you'll need this to follow along with this new tutorial) and continue on, starting with the basics of namespacing and autoloading. They then move over and start applying this functionality to the plugin classes and what happens in the autoloader when they're referenced.

tagged: wordpress autoload namespace tutorial part3 series

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-3--cms-27332

NetTuts.com:
WP REST API: Setting Up and Using OAuth 1.0a Authentication
Jan 15, 2016 @ 10:54:12

The NetTuts.com site has a new tutorial posted showing you how to work with the authentication of the WordPress REST API and using its OAuth 1.0a handling. This is part three in their series of tutorials introducing the WordPress REST API.

In the previous part of the series, we set up basic HTTP authentication on the server by installing the plugin available on GitHub by the WP REST API team. [...] For using authentication on production servers, there needs to be a more secure way of sending authenticated requests without risking exposing the login credentials. Thanks to the OAuth authentication method, those requests can be sent without exposing the username and the password in an unsafe manner.

In the current part of the series, we will learn to set up and use the OAuth authentication method to be used with the WP REST API plugin.

They start the tutorial with a brief look at what OAuth is and how it's used to authenticate the end user/client/software/etc. They then walk through the flow of a simple OAuth-based authentication system and the pieces that make it up. Then the article gets into how to install the plugin for your WordPress instance and activate it from the command line. They show how to test that it's enabled and how to use a command line client to create tokens you can then use to access the API in your own clients.

tagged: wordpress tutorial wpapi api rest oauth authentication series part3

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/wp-rest-api-setting-up-and-using-oauth-10a-authentication--cms-24797

Piotr Pasich:
Putting all pieces together and shipping with Codeship (Continuous Deployment – part I
Aug 18, 2015 @ 12:45:01

Piotr Pasich continues his series covering the integration of Docker, Elastic Beanstalk and Codeship to create a workflow for shipping and releasing code. In the first two parts of the series he set up most of the technology involved and hooked some of it together. In this latest article he finishes the process, connecting CodeShip with GitHub and your tests.

Today I will walk you through combining all the pieces together and automating the process fully. A continuous integration system will be placed between developer’s environment and final servers. I’ll present how to achieve all of that with Codeship. What make me choose this particular mechanism? The simplicity of setting up, number of additional tools ready to use without installation and finally the fact that it isn’t time consuming.

He shows how to connect CodeShip with your GitHub repository. He shows how to create a new CodeShip project to handle the build complete with a screencast to ensure things are set up as they should be. He includes a bit of "magic" you'll need to do with the CodeShip configuration to get it to work with the Docker setup, but the change is minimal. He also shows you how to set up the execution of your tests and how to see what failed when a build is broken. Finally he shows the process for setting up the deployment to the hosting provider (in this case Digital Ocean) and how to configure your Amazon credentials right in the interface.

tagged: codeship elasticbeanstalk continuous deployment series part3 docker tutorial

Link: http://piotrpasich.com/putting-all-pieces-together-and-shipping-with-codeship-continuous-deployment-part-iii/