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Asmir Mustafic:
How do I deploy my Symfony API - Part 4 - Deploy
Oct 11, 2017 @ 10:23:12

Asmir Mustafic has posted the next part of his series covering the deployment of Symfony applications. In this latest article (part four) he focuses on some of the final steps of the deployment process.

This is the forth post from a series of posts that will describe the whole deploy process from development to production. The first article is available here, the second here and the third here.

After covering the steps 1-3 and having prepared our infrastructure, we can see how to deploy our application to production. Almost the same approach can be used to deploy not only to production but also to test environments.

He starts with the workflow for the deployment process, creating a flow where the "git push" should trigger other actions based on the branch pushed. Then CircleCI will fire off a series of jobs to handle environment setup tasks, connecting to a VPN and deploying the code. This includes a bit of preparation, credential handling and the Docker setup and push. Each step along the way also includes all of the YAML configurations you might need to replicate the deployment.

tagged: symfony api deployment part4 series docker configuration example

Link: https://www.goetas.com/blog/how-do-i-deploy-my-symfony-api-part-4-deploy/

Sammy Kaye Powers:
Writing tests for PHP source (Series)
Jul 21, 2017 @ 11:21:48

Sammy Kaye Powers has a series of posts over on his site introducing you to testing the PHP language with .phpt tests. So far he's introduced the topic, shown how to run the tests and debugging failing tests.

If you've ever wanted to get involved with PHP internals, writing tests is a great way to get your foot into the door. The tests are written in PHP so you don't even need to know C to get started.

Each of the posts also comes with a screencast, narrated by Sammy, showing the information presented in the tutorial:

There's more to come in the series as he still plans to teach about how to fix current tests and how to eventually create your own. Stay tuned to his site for more tutorials in the series.

tagged: test unittest phpt language source series part1 part2 part3 part4

Link: https://www.sammyk.me/compiling-php-from-source-writing-tests-for-php-source

Esben Petersen:
A modern REST API in Laravel 5 Part 4: Authentication using Laravel Passport
Mar 20, 2017 @ 10:56:15

Esben Petersen has posted the fourth part of his tutorial series covering the creation of a "modern REST API" with Laravel. In this latest article he focuses on authenticating users with the help of an OAuth2 flow.

OAuth is all around us. Most of us have tried to login to a 3rd party service using our Facebook or Google account as a login. This login mechanism is one of many OAuth authentication types. However, you can also use OAuth to generate simple API keys. One of the OAuth authentication types generates API keys based on username and password and is therefore a solid authentication choice for SaaS-style apps. This article will explore how to setup the password grant authentication type in Laravel using Laravel Passport.

The article is broken up into a few different sections, each with explanations and code where appropriate to help illustrate the point:

  • a basic introduction to OAuth2 and grants
  • authentication in single-page applications
  • dependencies to use (and install/configuration)
  • creating the login proxy
  • building a consumer

The final step is an example (using a curl command) to test the API and ensure things are working as expected. The post ends with a more "real world" example of a Slack-style application and linking channels and user but only showing the channels users have access to based on scope.

tagged: tutorial rest api laravel series part4 oauth2 passport

Link: http://esbenp.github.io/2017/03/19/modern-rest-api-laravel-part-4/

NetTuts.com:
Using Namespaces and Autoloading in WordPress Plugins, Part 4
Jan 19, 2017 @ 10:24:36

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the fourth part of their series covering the use of namespacing and autoloading in WordPress plugins. In this latest tutorial they take everything they've shared (and made) previously and put it all together into a cohesive whole plugin.

At this point, we've laid the foundation for our plugin, written the plugin, and defined and explored namespaces and autoloaders. All that's left is to apply what we've learned.

So in this tutorial, we're going to put all of the pieces together. Specifically, we're going to revisit the source code of our plugin, namespace all relevant classes, and write an autoloader so that we can remove all of our include statements.

He starts off talking about namespacing and how it relates to directory structure and the code you'll need for each of the plugin files for put them in the correct namespace. With just these in place, however, errors are thrown. This requires the setup of a custom autoloader and PHP's own spl_autoload_register handling. He includes the code for the autoloader, taking in the class name and splitting it up to locate the correct directory, making it easier to replace the loading of all plugin scripts.

tagged: namespacing tutorial series part4 wordpress plugin autoloading namespace

Link: https://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/using-namespaces-and-autoloading-in-wordpress-plugins-4--cms-27342

Ibuildings Blog:
Programming Guidelines - Part 4: Messages
Feb 17, 2016 @ 11:19:17

Ibuildings has posted the fourth part of their "Programming Guidelines" series to their blog, sharing even more helpful hints and tips you can apply to your everyday development. In this new post author Matthias Noback talks about messaging in your application, not in output to the user but in the communication between parts of your system.

In the previous parts of this series we looked at how to get rid of complexity at the level of algorithms. After discussing the problem of nulls in your code, we looked at object lifecycles and how to encapsulate them properly. Now that we have objects that can be constructed and changed only in valid ways, we need to look at how they communicate with each other and how we can improve our code with regard to that aspect.

He then breaks up the rest of the article into a few sections:

  • Object communication
  • Message categories
  • Command/Query Separation Principle
  • Implementing commands
  • Queries
  • Documents
  • Command query responsibility segregation
  • Events

For each section a description of the topic is provided and a bit of sample code is included to help illustrate the change/functionality.

tagged: programming guideline part4 series message object tutorial

Link: https://www.ibuildings.nl/blog/2016/02/programming-guidelines-part-4-messages

Phillip Shipley:
Creating a PHP Nexmo API Client using Guzzle Web Service Client – Part 4
Apr 15, 2015 @ 09:56:21

Phillip Shipley continues his series looking at creating a client for the Nexmo API with his latest post, part four focusing on the testing of the current connections and state of the code.

At this point in this series we have a complete PHP client for the Nexmo APIs. Hopefully I’ve been able to teach some good practices and designs in the process of developing it, but I know many of you test-driven-development advocates are probably screaming that I’ve left out the most important part: testing, and testing early. Well, in order to keep these tutorials focused I’ve saved the testing to the end, and actually when testing API clients I find it easier to write the tests afterwards, but I’ll get into that later.

He points out that running tests on code that connects to APIs it a bit tricky as you don't want it to make actual API requests every time you run the tests. Instead he shows how to use Guzzle mock responses and the Mockable.io service (when you do actually need to test that HTTP requests are made). He includes the code examples to create the Guzzle mock response as well as a brief look at how to use Mockable along with your current tests with an "override" on the base URL.

tagged: series tutorial part4 guzzle nexmo api client testing mockresponse mockableio

Link: http://www.phillipshipley.com/2015/04/creating-a-php-nexmo-api-client-using-guzzle-web-service-client-part-4/

NetTuts.com:
Building Your Startup With PHP: Localization With I18n
Mar 09, 2015 @ 10:43:08

In the latest part of their series of "building a startup" application in PHP, NetTuts.com looks at supporting internationalization with the functionality of the Yii framework.

This is part four of the Building Your Startup With PHP series on Tuts+. In this series, I'm guiding you through launching a startup from concept to reality using my Meeting Planner app as a real life example. Every step along the way, we'll release the Meeting Planner code as open source examples you can learn from. We'll also address startup-related business issues as they arise. In this tutorial, I wanted to step back and add I18n internationalization support to our application before we build more and more code.

They start off with a look at some of the overall goals of internationalization (i18n) and about how it works in the Yii system. It uses placeholders with a key/value system to replace the data based on which language is selected. They show you how to configure Yii's support including default language, sorting of the data and files to exclude when looking for i18n configurations. With this configuration in place they show how to use the command line tool to extract these messages out into separate folders for easier management and faster reference. Finally they show how to select a language and use the Yii code generator together with the translations to create models and forms.

tagged: build startup series part4 internationalization i18n localization language yii framework

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/building-your-startup-with-php-localization-with-i18n--cms-23102

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Single Page App with Laravel and EmberJS
Sep 01, 2014 @ 15:28:33

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted the fourth part in their "REST App with Laravel and EmberJS" series today. In this latest tutorial they focus in on the frontend and investigate how Ember works how to get started in your application.

In this part, we will see how Ember works, how to use Ember Data and how to build something simple with it. Router, Route, Model, Template and Store are some of the concepts of Ember. I’m not going to explain every one of those, so if you feel stuck, use the documentation.

They dive right into the code, getting a simple Ember "App" instance set up and configured. They add in a REST adapter to connect it to the backend API and lay out a few of the routes. They then create the models to represent the data and link each to a route. Next they get into views and creating the interface and frontend markup (using Handlebars templating). A gif is included showing the results and how things should look at this point.

tagged: tutorial series emberjs part4 laravel rest api

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/single-page-app-laravel-emberjs/

NetTuts.com:
Refactoring Legacy Code: Part 4 - Our First Unit Tests
May 19, 2014 @ 13:57:41

NetTuts.com has posted the fourth part of their series guiding you through some recommended steps for refactoring legacy code. In this new post they build on the previous steps and focus more on the first steps into unit testing.

One of the key moments of refactoring a totally legacy code is when we start extracting small pieces from it and we start writing targeted unit tests for those small pieces. But this can be quite difficult, especially when you have code that is written so that it would be hard to compile or run if pieces of it are missing. We can't safely do large surgeries on a code we still barely understand and only a golden master test keeps us breaking it totally. Fortunately there are some techniques that can help us.

There's a brief introduction to unit testing and how it can be useful in a refactoring situation. They help you locate some isolated methods to start with and include a sample test (using PHPUnit). They talk about handling dependency injection, refactoring the tests themselves and working with dependencies across environments. Hints on isolating parts of the code that can be and how to refactor the tests to match are also included.

tagged: refactor legacy code series part4 unittest phpunit

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/refactoring-legacy-code-part-4-our-first-unit-tests--cms-21146

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Using Solarium with SOLR for Search – Advanced
May 08, 2014 @ 11:56:46

The SitePoint PHP blog has finished off their series showing you how to integrate searching with SOLR (via Solarium) into your PHP application. In this last part of the series, Lukas White gets into some of the more advanced topics around searching and handling the resulting output in your views.

In the first three parts we installed and configured SOLR and Solarium and started building an example application for searching movies. We’ve also looked at faceted search. We’re going to wrap up the series by looking at some more advanced features of SOLR, and how to use them with Solarium.

He's broken up the rest of the tutorial to talk about a few of these more advanced features like:

  • Highlighting search matches in the output of documents (depending on the type of match)
  • Using the searching for an autocomplete
  • Configuring and making the request with an array-based configuration (a more manual process)
  • Adding additional cores to the search (allowing for more flexibility on search styles and configurations)

He also points to two other resources that could be handy along your path to SOLR dominance: the SOLR reference guide and the official Solarium documentation.

tagged: solr search solarium library tutorial series part4 advanced

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/using-solarium-solr-search-advanced/