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SitePoint PHP Blog:
Drupal 8 Third Party Settings and Pseudo-Fields
Sep 15, 2015 @ 12:25:45

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series looking at Drupal 8 with this new article from Daniel Sipos about third-party settings and pseudo-fields. Part one of the series can be found here

In the first installment of this series we started our journey towards creating some simple but powerful functionality. The goal we set was to have the possibility to load a form on each node page and to be able to choose which form type should be used on the different node bundles. [...] It follows to see how we can configure the core node types to use one of the plugins defined on the site and how to render the relevant form when viewing the node. But first, in order to have something to work with, let’s create our first ReusableForm plugin that uses a very simple form.

He starts back in with the creation of a first simple plugin to handle the form created in the previous part of the series, assigning the form to it via annotations. He then configures the node entities to be able to use the plugin via the services YAML configuration file. He then updates the .module with a function for altering node details and an entity builder. He updates the schema definition to be able to show the form and, finally, render the form out to the view with the assigned node entity types.

tagged: drupal8 series part2 thirdparty settings pseudofields form tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/drupal-8-third-party-settings-and-pseudo-fields/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Drupal 8 Custom Plugin Types
Sep 14, 2015 @ 11:08:06

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted an overview from Daniel Sipos covering custom plugin types in Drupal 8 and how you can combine them (custom forms) with node entities.

In this article series of two parts, we will use this system to build a feature that allows the use of custom forms together with node entities. After we’re done, we’ll be able to do the following: configure node bundles to use one of multiple form types to be displayed together with the node display and easily define new form types by extending from a sensible base class. [...] We will get started by creating our custom plugin type. T

He starts with the plugin manager, showing you how to create a custom ReusableFormsManager in the module to set up the manager and add it to the system. He then sets up the plugin interface the manager is expecting to find. This piece defines methods to get the name of the plugin and to build the form. He then creates a simple ReusableForm annotation class and builds out the plugin base. This base class includes a form builder object used to build and output the custom form. Finally he gets into building the form and its matching interface. It's a simple "Contact Us" kind of form that outputs three fields (first name, last name, email) and a "Submit" button.

tagged: drupal8 custom plugin type tutorial form contactus

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/drupal-8-custom-plugin-types/

Joshua Thjissen:
Understanding Symfony2 Forms
Sep 14, 2015 @ 09:28:50

Joshua Thjissen has a post on his site that wants to help you understand the basics of Symfony2 forms including how to build them, extend them and the modules they're made up of.

To actually use Symfony2 forms, all you need to do is read some documentation, a few blog posts and you’ll be up and running in a couple of minutes. Understanding Symfony2 forms however, is a whole different ballgame. In order to understand a seemingly simple process of “adding fields to a form”, we must understand a lot of the basic foundation of the Symfony2 Form component. In these blog posts, I’ll try and give some more insights on this foundation.

He starts by explaining the three main steps in the typical form lifecycle: building the form itself, populating and validating data and rendering the form to the waiting user. He then gets into some of the basics of using forms and the types of objects that make them up. He includes examples of creating a simple form, the YAML configuration it compiles to and the functions used to build, render and set options on the form. He finishes up the post looking at form inheritance, extending the form types and where the "ResolvedFormType" comes in to play.

tagged: symfony2 form understand overview types build render validate populate

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2015/09/11/understanding-symfony2-forms/

Bernhard Schussek:
Value Objects in Symfony Forms
Sep 10, 2015 @ 11:35:20

Bernhard Schussek has posted a tutorial on his Webmozart.io site talking about the use of value objects in Symfony forms. By nature value objects don't allow the use of "setters" to assign/change values but he shows how to use a custom data mapper to work around the problem.

Many times, Symfony developers wonder how to make a form work with value objects. For example, think of a Money object with two fields $amount and $currency. [...] Can you write a form type for this class without adding the methods setAmount() and setCurrency()? In this post, I will show you how.

He starts with a bit of an overview on what value objects are and how the concept of immutability comes into play. He shows examples of potential issues if setters are allowed to change data and what should be done when a value change is actually needed. He then gets into the heart of the matter, integrating the forms handling with simple value objects. He goes through building a simple form and the use of the empty_data option to create a new value object with the form values. This works fine but breaks down if you need to update an object. Instead he creates a custom data mapper that sets up two methods, mapDataToForms and mapFormsToData, that allow for both interactions to work correctly.

tagged: value object symfony form tutorial custom data mapper emptydata

Link: https://webmozart.io/blog/2015/09/09/value-objects-in-symfony-forms/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Build Multi-step Forms in Drupal 8
Jul 07, 2015 @ 12:25:06

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post for the Drupal users out there showing you how to create multi-step forms in your application.

In this article, we are going to look at building a multistep form in Drupal 8. For brevity, the form will have only two steps in the shape of two completely separate forms. To persist values across these steps, we will use functionality provided by Drupal’s core for storing temporary and private data across multiple requests. In Drupal 7, a similar approach can be achieved using the cTools object cache. Alternatively, there is the option of persisting data through the $form_state array as illustrated in this tutorial.

They start by setting out what the end result will be - a simple two-page form with two fields each, allowing for navigation back and forth between the pages. They start with a base class defining requirements needed for both pages and setting up the necessary form structure. They walk through each part of this base class, explaining the functionality going along. With that in place they extend it with a "MultistepOneForm" and "MultistepTwoForm" classes extending the base and defining two fields on each.

tagged: tutorial drupal drupal8 multistep form

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-build-multi-step-forms-in-drupal-8/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
CRUD (Create Read Update Delete) in a Laravel App
May 25, 2015 @ 09:49:11

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series around the creation of a basic CRUD (create, read, update and delete) application with PHP. In this second part of the series they build on the simple application in the first part and enhance it with the remainder of the CRUD handling.

In the previous part, we’ve bootstrapped our Laravel CRUD application by creating the database, some controllers, basic routes and simple views. In this part, we’ll wrap things up and implement proper CRUD.

He jumps right in and creates the controller action and view to take in new "Task" information. This includes the installation of the Illuminate HTML package and setup of the needed provider and facades. He shows how to create the Task model and hook the results of the request into it and make the new record. This includes some basic "required" validation too. He then shows how to read and display the list of current tasks as well as setting up the edit and delete actions for each task.

tagged: tutorial crud application laravel series part2 model form view

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/crud-create-read-update-delete-laravel-app/

Web Development Blog:
Add a MailChimp subscribe feature to your contact form
May 05, 2015 @ 12:14:13

The Web Development Blog has a tutorial posted showing how to add a Mailchimp "subscribe" feature to your current contact forms. They make use of the MailChimp API wrapper library to make the calls back to the service and subscribe the user at their request.

MailChimp is a great email marketing service provider with an easy to use control panel and features like: campaign management (RSS-driven, A/B Split, Plain-text and regular), statistics, auto-responder and a complete set of list management tools. They offer different ways to place a subscriber form on your website or blog. If you to like add the MailChimp subscribe feature to your existing contact form you need to add some custom code.

They start with a few things you'll need to do to prepare for the connection including the setup of an API key to make the request. He provides a simple "Contact Us" form for reference and the code needed on submit to validate the input and make the subscription call to the API with the email the user provided. He also includes a bit of response handling.

tagged: mailchimp tutorial subscribe contactus form api request

Link: http://www.web-development-blog.com/archives/mailchimp-subscribe-contact-form/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Automated Testing of Drupal 8 Modules
May 04, 2015 @ 11:06:08

The SitePoint PHP blog has a tutorial posted talking about the automated testing of Drupal 8 modules, the components of the popular PHP-based content management system. In it author Daniel Sipos shows how to create a few tests for some functionality created in previous articles.

In this article we are going to look at automated testing in Drupal 8. More specifically, we are going to write a few integration tests for some of the business logic we wrote in the previous Sitepoint articles on Drupal 8 module development. [...] But before doing that, we will talk a bit about what kinds of tests we can write in Drupal 8 and how they actually work.

He makes use of the SimpleTest unit testing tool for PHP (versus something like PHPUnit) as it has become a standard for Drupal's own testing. He talks briefly about what SimpleTest is, how it integrates with Drupal and what kinds of tests already exist. He then gets into testing his own functionality - checking route information, that the page exists, the contents of the resulting page and the addition of a custom block plugin. He shows how to create these simple tests, extending the WebTestBase class, and checking each item on the list. He also includes an example of the resulting output of the successful testing, including time to execute and the detailed results of each test.

tagged: drupal8 automated testing tutorial simpletest introduction exists form custom plugin

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/automated-testing-drupal-8-modules/

Eric Barnes:
How To: Validate an array of form fields with Laravel
Apr 07, 2015 @ 09:48:34

Eric Barnes has a new post to his site showing you how to validate form input in a Laravel application using the form requests feature.

If you’ve used Laravel’s form validation for any length of time, then you know it’s a powerful system. It makes the tedious task of validation very simple while still keeping the door open for complex rules. In this tutorial, I want to show you a simple and easy way of validating forms that contain dynamic fields. A common use case for these types of forms is when you would like to allow a user to add more fields to a form.

His example uses a form with a handful of text fields rendered with a simple "for" loop in the template. He then helps you make a new Request instance (OrderRequest) and adding custom validation rules into its "rules" method. In this case, he sets a rule that the content is required and can be no longer than 255 characters. He also shows how to use the custom messages functionality, defining custom values for each of the form's fields.

tagged: validate form data laravel formrequests example tutorial

Link: http://ericlbarnes.com/laravel-array-validation/

Programming Are Hard:
Structuring my applications, Cont'd
Mar 09, 2015 @ 12:03:16

The Programming Are Hard site continues its look at structuring Symfony-based applications in part two (it's just two parts) building on the structure and foundation laid out in part one.

It really irks me when I see some design/architecture decisions other developers have made but there's no technical explanation. What packages did they use? What challenges did they face? What trade-offs were made? I'll go over some more specifics in this post.

He recaps some of the things covered in the previous post first, ensuring everyone is on the same page. He then gets into the concept of "bundles" and how they encapsulate functionality. From there he talks about commands, controllers, dependency injection and lots of other topics, each with their own summary and a bit of code where needed for clarification.

tagged: structuring application symfony bundle command controller di form provider repository resource serialize

Link: http://programmingarehard.com/2015/03/05/structing-my-application-contd.html