Looking for more information on how to do PHP the right way? Check out PHP: The Right Way

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Breaking Free from Guzzle5 with PHP-HTTP and HTTPlug
Nov 09, 2015 @ 09:35:41

In a new tutorial from the SitePoint PHP blog editor Bruno Skvorc shows you how to "break free" from using the Guzzle HTTP client (which has become, by far, the most popular) and make it simpler to go with another option. He highlights the HTTPlug library that makes it easy to do just that.

In a previous series, we built a PHP client for Diffbot. The client works well and is in relatively widespread use – we even tested it on a live app to make sure it’s up to par – but it depends heavily on Guzzle 5.

There are two problems with this: Guzzle 6 is out, and supports PSR 7. [...] Someone implementing our client in their app might already have a preferred HTTP client in use, and would like to use theirs rather than Guzzle. [...] Coincidentally, there is a new project allowing us to do just that: HTTPlug.

He walks you through the installation of the library via Composer and covers what all kinds of functionality it contains. HTTPlug provides an "entry point" and unified interface for the HTTP client of your choosing, complete with interface packages to wrap the most common functionality. He shows how to refactor his Diffbot code to use the package, replacing the previous Guzzle dependency using the virtual package definition HTTPlug provides. He also updates some of the tests to use the HTTPlug package types rather than relying on Guzzle's object return types.

tagged: guzzle http client httplug library abstract tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/breaking-free-from-guzzle5-with-php-http-and-httplug/

Paul Jones:
Semantic Versioning and Public Interfaces
Jun 03, 2015 @ 09:16:33

Paul Jones has an interesting post to his site that makes the link between software versioning and public interfaces your code provides. He points out that, despite semantic versioning helping to define how to version your code, there's still some ambiguity about it and backwards compatibility.

Adherence to Semantic Versioning is just The Right Thing To Do, but it turns out you have to be extra-careful when modifying public interfaces to maintain backwards compatibility. This is obvious on reflection, but I never thought about it beforehand. Thanks to Hari KT for pointing it out. Why do you have to be extra-careful with interfaces and SemVer? [...] If we remove a public method, that’s clearly a BC break. If we add a non-optional parameter to an existing public method, that’s also clearly a BC break. [...] However, if we add a new public method to the concrete class, that is not a BC break. Likewise, changing the signature of an existing method to add an optional parameter is not a BC break either. [...] But what happens with an interface?

He suggests that changing current functionality (such as adding a non-optional parameter) is a backwards compatibility break but in an interface so is adding a new method. By adding a method you "break" the implementation someone already has, causing plenty of trouble for the users. He wonders about the right approach for making these updates, if it's creating a new interface or just extending the current one and having users migrate. He also includes a few update notes about abstract classes and how Symfony handles BC breaks too.

tagged: versioning public interface backwardscompatibility break bc abstract symfony

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/6136

Marc Morera:
Bye Bye Symfony
Sep 04, 2014 @ 12:41:00

In his most recent post Marc Morera says bye bye to Symfony and "hello to PHP". Confused? His point is that using the Symfony components as a whole in the framework isn't the only option anymore. You can use them just as effectively as pieces of a larger PHP project, puling them in as needed.

The reason of this post is just to tell you, with a simple example, how to say Bye Bye, Symfony! and say Hi PHP!. This really means uncouple from Symfony Components and still use them as the default implementation, while we can securely remove, from the composer require block, our Symfony dependencies.

He starts off with a simple example showing how to use Symfony's "UrlGeneratorInterface" to create a URL output class that can be injected to use in the route handling of the application. He then moves on to a more real-life example (a metaphor) using a USB connection and the adapters/cables that could be involved to connect various devices. He then shifts back over to the world of code and describes a specification interface that can be used with the URL generation and remove the Symfony dependency from it. On top of this he builds an adapter object that brings the Symfony component back into the picture and abstracts it out a level to make for more flexibility and testability in the long run.

We win maximum implementation flexibility and minimum coupling. Would be wise to say that a PHP project should tend to this thought, but once again, it depends on many factors. [...] Using ports and adapters is really a great tool for those who want to uncouple from implementations and a great pattern if you develop open source. Open source should satisfy as people as possible, so remember, specify and then implement.
tagged: symfony component abstract tutorial interface specification

Link: http://mmoreram.com/blog/2014/09/01/bye-bye-symfony/

Master Zend Framework:
Configuring the ServiceManager with Abstract Factories
Jul 23, 2014 @ 13:41:10

On the Master Zend Framework site today Matthew Setter has a new post covering the configuring of the service manager using abstract factories.

One of the best features about Zend Framework 2 is undoubtedly the ServiceManager; because it makes it almost painless to configure and retrieve services in a consistent and predictable manner, anywhere in your application, at any time. [...] But the catch is, there’s quite a bit to learn if you want to use it properly. As well as that, there’s quite a number of ways to use it.

He walks you through some of the pros and cons of the various ways to work with the ServiceManager and where the factories fit in. He takes a bit of time to introduce the concepts behind abstract factories and how to define them in a Zend Framework v2 application. He finishes out the post with a more practical, working example using the interfaces provided to get a "MyUserTable" service.

tagged: configure servicemanager abstract factory tutorial screencast

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/servicemanager/configuring-servicemanager-with-abstract-factories

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Abstract File Systems with Flysystem
Apr 07, 2014 @ 11:27:59

The SitePoint PHP blog has a new tutorial today from Lukas White showing you how to work with abstract file systems that aren't local. In this case, the file system is virtual and living on a remote system.

Reading and writing files is an integral aspect of any programming language, but the underlying implementation can vary enormously. For example, the finer details of writing data to the local filesystem compared to uploading over FTP is very different – yet conceptually, it’s very similar. In addition to old warhorses like FTP, online storage is increasingly ubiquitous and inexpensive – with scores of services available such as Dropbox, Amazon’s S3 and Rackspace’s Cloud Files – but these all use subtly different methods for reading and writing. That’s where flysystem comes in.

He shows how to install the flysystem library (via Composer) and a few examples showing how to make connections to:

  • an Amazon S3 instance
  • a Dropbox account
  • SFTP
  • even Memcache

Examples of both reading and writing to this virtual system are also included as well as a few other features like handling visibility, listing files/directories and mounting the remote filesystem locally.

tagged: abstract filesystem flysystem library tutorial

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/abstract-file-systems-flysystem

Should we use Abstract class or Interface?
Apr 18, 2013 @ 09:22:23

On the Pixelstech.com site today there's a new post that talks about the differences between abstract classes and interfaces and when's the best time to use either (or both).

When we write programs, we may often get into a situation where we don't know whether we should use Abstract class or Interface when we want to define an abstract object. These two are very similar and they are interchangeable. On Stackoverflow, this question is asked many times, it's related to many programming languages. Also in the official documentation of PHP regarding the Abstract class and Interface, people are arguing about this. To understand this question, we need to understand their differences and use scenarios.

They provide examples of abstract class and interface usage with one of the main differences being that you can define functionality in abstract classes. There's also examples showing classes that extend the abstract class while implementing the interface at the same time, helping to define the object structure to an even finer level.

tagged: abstract class interface tutorial choice extends implements

Link: http://www.pixelstech.net/article/1366044255_Should_we_use_Abstract_class_or_Interface_

QaFoo Blog:
Abstract Classes vs. Interfaces
Oct 02, 2012 @ 12:29:56

On the QaFoo.com blog Kore Nordmann shares some insight about the difference between abstract classes and interfaces and how they can be used effectively/correctly.

Features of object oriented languages are often use from a purely technical perspective, without respect to their actual semantics. This is fine as long as it works for you, but might lead to problems in the long run. In this article I discuss the semantical differences between abstract classes and interfaces. I also outline why following the semantics of those language constructs can lead to better code.

He defines "class" and "interface" before he gets too far into the differences, stating that a "class" is more of a "type" while an "interface" describes the type and the structure to use it. He also talks about how to tell them apart (when to use each). There's also some examples and "hints" to help you determine good and bad examples of interfaces and when an abstract class might be a better answer.

tagged: abstract class interface compare tips definition


Overriding Strategy Logic - The Template Method Pattern
Sep 25, 2012 @ 08:58:01

On PHPMaster.com there's a new tutorial posted talking about the Template Method Pattern to help make some sense (and make easier to use) your implementation of the Strategy pattern.

This bring us back to the question whether it’s feasible to eliminate duplicated strategy logic via Inheritance rather than switching over to plain Composition. Indeed it is, and the clean up process can be conducted through an ubiquitous pattern known as Template Method. [...] Simply put, there’s a base class (usually an abstract one), which declares a concrete method (a.k.a. the template) responsible for outlining the steps or hooks of a certain algorithm. Most of the time the base type provides boilerplate implementation for some of those steps and the remaining ones are delegated to subclasses.

The subtypes then override the base's functionality and extend it with their own. They show an example of this by making a jQuery image slider (using this plugin) , an "AbstractCycleSlider" class and two subclasses for two other types - "FadeSlider" and "ScrollSlider", each outputting their own HTML. It also shows how to implement a slider using a different plugin and output both in the same script.

tagged: strategy logic designpattern template method abstract subtype


Subtype Polymorphism - Swapping Implementation at Runtime
Sep 17, 2012 @ 12:48:52

On PHPMaster.com there's a new tutorial from Alejandro Gervasio about subtype polymorphism. It sounds a little scary, but really it's just a look at sub-objects that inherit from parents and how to swap them around at runtime to do different things.

In this article I’ll show you how to exploit the virtues that Polymorphism offers through the development of a pluggable cache component. The core functionality can be expanded later to suit your needs through the development of additional cache drivers.

He starts off with the definition of an interface to provide structure to the sample application (the CacheInterface) and implements it in two different subtypes - a FileCache and an AppCache (using the file system and APC, respectively). He builds on these and creates a "View" that uses these caching systems to generate and save the output to a cache for use later in the execution.

tagged: subtype polymorphism tutorial interface abstract caching


Traits in PHP - Multiple and Nested Traits
May 28, 2012 @ 15:16:29

On the Refulz.com blog there's a new tutorial posted looking at traits (and nested traits) in PHP including examples of them in use and how to create your own.

Traits is a good new addition to PHP language. In our series about the new features of PHP 5.4, we reviewed the concept of Traits in PHP. The introductory article talks about what the traits are and what is the general syntax of Traits in PHP. The second article attempts to explain why we need traits.

The tutorial shows you how to define a custom trait use things like abstract methods, nesting them by making them "users" and how to use multiples at the same time (comma-separating).

tagged: traits multiple nested tutorial abstract