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Rob Allen:
Simple way to add a filter to Zend-InputFilter
Jun 21, 2017 @ 09:16:29

Rob Allen has a quick new post to his site sharing a simple way to add a filter to the Zend-InputFilter component when it's in use on your site.

Using Zend-InputFilter is remarkably easy to use. [...] How do you add your filter to it though?

He starts with an example of putting the component to use in requiring and filtering the value in "my_field" for the data provided. He then shows how to add his "simple filter that does absolutely nothing", the MyFilter, to the current set. He also shows the creation of a "filter factory" class that registers the custom filter into the chain with an alias of "MyFIlter". You can then use it just like you would any other filter and define it in your rules specification.

tagged: zendframework zendinputfilter component custom filter tutorial factory

Link: https://akrabat.com/simple-way-to-add-a-filter-to-zend-inputfilter/

Nikola Posa:
Using Monolog with Zend Service Manager
Jun 16, 2017 @ 12:09:27

Nikola Posa has a new post to his site showing you how to can combine Monolog for logging with Zend Service Manager, a component from the Zend Framework, defining the logger as a service that can be easily used (and re-used) across an application.

Without any doubt, Monolog and Zend Service Manager are two libraries that are almost always found in the composer.json file require section of my projects. In case you didn't know, Monolog is a PSR-3 compliant logging library that allows you to save logs to various storage types and web services, while Zend Service Manager is a PSR-11 compliant dependency injection container and a service locator implementation that facilitates management of application dependencies.

In this post I'm gonna show you how the two can work together.

He starts with an example of configuring the ServiceManager instance with a factory dependency that manually creates the Monolog logger inline. While this works, it's not idea, mixing configuration and functionality. He shows how to refactor the same functionality into a factory class that performs the same function but isolates it from the configuration. He then takes this further and separates out the environment-specific configuration from the handling and, finally, shows the creation of a more general logging factory that allows the definition of different kinds of loggers based on the need.

tagged: monolog zendservicemanager component tutorial combine factory configuration

Link: http://blog.nikolaposa.in.rs/2017/06/12/using-monolog-with-zend-service-manager/

Medium.com:
Expressive Code & Real Time Facades
May 10, 2017 @ 11:13:54

On his Medium.com blog Laravel project lead Taylor Otwell shares some of his thoughts on expressive code and real-time facades and how they make things simpler, event for testing/mocking.

Recently, I worked on some code that surfaced my most common use-case for Laravel 5.4’s “real-time” facades. If you’re not familiar with this feature, it allows you to use any of your application’s classes as a Laravel “facade” on-demand by prefixingFacades to the namespace when importing the class. This is not a feature that is littered throughout my code, but I find it occasionally provides a clean, testable approach to writing expressive object APIs.

To illustrate he uses the code from the Laravel Forge service talking about service providers (like DigitalOcean, Linode, etc) and "service" classes to contain API methods. He then shifts over to the controller to see how he'd like to access it, making a generic Provider class with a make method to create the instance. This has an issue, however, with testing making it very difficult. Instead he shifts over to the real-time facades and a factory where the test can more easily manually mock the method into a stub provider (example included).

tagged: expressive code realtime facade testing factory tutorial

Link: https://medium.com/@taylorotwell/expressive-code-real-time-facades-41c442914291

Master Zend Framework:
How To Generate Class Factories The Easy Way with FactoryCreator
Jan 20, 2017 @ 10:07:57

The Master Zend Framework site has a new tutorial posted guiding you through the process of generating class factories the easy way with the help of the "FactoryCreator" tool in the Zend ServiceManager component.

If there’s one thing that’s always frustrated me when working with Zend Framework, it’s having to create factories for classes. Sure, it’s gotten easier as Zend ServiceManager’s continued to ever improve. And PhpStorm and Zend ServiceManager Grand Master, Gary Hockin, has given me a number of great tips and suggestions.

But it’s always been something I’ve felt frustrated by. Perhaps you feel the same. [...] But, what I’ve felt for some time is that they could also make it easier for us to follow these best practices too, such as with some tooling support. In the latest release of Zend ServiceManager, version 3.2.0, they have.

He goes on to talk about two tools that are included in this latest release: the ConfigDumper and FactoryCreator. He helps you get the FactoryCreator tool installed and provides a simple example of it in use, generating the factory for a "JournalService" class. He includes the results of the generation of the simple example before moving on to a more complicated example: a TableGateway object. The final example shows the generation of the factory for an "Actions" class, handling the controller processing for a simple MVC application. If you're a bit shorter on time, he's also created a screencast version of the tutorial you can view in-page or over on Vimeo.

tagged: zendframework generate class factory factorycreator tutorial screencast

Link: http://www.masterzendframework.com/simple-factory-generation-with-factorycreator/

Robert Basic:
Using Doctrine DBAL with Zend Expressive
Dec 22, 2016 @ 11:19:53

Robert Basic has written up a quick post to his site sharing details on how you can use Doctrine's DBAL with Zend Expressive without having to use the entire Doctrine ORM. DBAL is Doctrine's abstraction layer that makes it easier to work with your database at a higher level than writing manual SQL statements.

The database abstraction and access layer — Doctrine DBAL — which I prefer over other abstraction layers like Zend DB. My good friend James, aka Asgrim, has written already how to integrate Zend Expressive and Doctrine ORM.

But what if want to use only the DBAL with Zend Expressive, and not the entire ORM? It’s pretty easy as all we need to do is write one short factory that will create the database connection using the connection parameters we provide to it.

He includes the code snippet you'll need to define a "ConnectionFactory" to set up the connection and the configuration needed to allow it to connect to the database. He then shows how to set up the DI container with the new container factory as a dependency and use it by pulling the "db" object out of the container.

tagged: doctrine dbal zendexpressive tutorial example factory

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/using-doctrine-dbal-with-zend-expressive/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
RESTful Remote Object Proxies with ProxyManager
Sep 13, 2016 @ 11:03:15

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a tutorial introducing the use of ProxyManager in RESTful APIs to help interface your API endpoints directly with backend objects for the typical CRUD (create, read, update, delete) handling a REST API provides. ProxyManager is a tool created by Marco Pivetta to creating various kinds of proxies through a set of factory classes.

The proxy pattern is another cool design pattern in software development. A proxy is a class working as an interface to another class or web service. For the sake of simplicity, we’ll refer to proxied classes as subjects throughout the rest of the article. A proxy usually implements the same interface as the subject, so it looks like we’re calling the methods directly on the subject.

They start with a brief overview of proxies and the proxy design pattern for those not familiar then "cut to the chase" and show how to hook in ProxyManager via a custom adapter for the REST endpoints. They help you get all dependencies needed installed (via Composer) and the creation of a simple API using Silex and it's provider handling. They then create the application, set up the front controller and configure the relation between endpoint and proxy. Code is then included to create the required factories, interfaces and mappings. The tutorial wraps up with an example of using the API you've just created.

tagged: rest api tutorial proxymanager example factory classes

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/restful-remote-object-proxies-with-proxymanager/

Gary Hockin:
ConfigAbstractFactory in ZendServiceManager
Sep 02, 2016 @ 10:31:16

Gary Hockin has a post to his site today introducing you to the new ConfigAbstractFactory class to work with ZendServiceManager in Zend Framework applications. The library helps make the creation of configuration service factories easier than having to write them in code.

I wanted to introduce the new ConfigAbstractFactory that has been written for ZendServiceManager 3 and got merged to develop today and will be included in the next 3.2.0 release of the ServiceManager.

[...] Laravel has shown us that developer usability is a real thing and that by making things easier for your target audience you gain traction and Good Things Happen. This is why in response to an issue on the Service Manager repository, I’ve written the catchily named Config Abstract Factory. Essentially, it allows you to create service factories from configuration rather than having to write all the code.

He talks about being a fan of the "configuration over magic" approach the Zend Framework has and how, with this new new library, it makes it even easier to directly link configuration files and the objects created based on their contents. He gives a simple example of a UserServiceFactory, first showing the "old" way of handling it then how to shift over to the new abstract handler just defining the same setup in the module configuration.

tagged: configuration abstract factory class servicemanager zendframework

Link: https://blog.hock.in/2016/09/02/configabstractfactory-in-zendservicemanager/

Mark Baker:
Anonymous Class Factory – The Results are in
May 13, 2016 @ 12:15:17

Following up on his previous post about anonymous classes and a factory to generate them, Mark Baker has posted about the results of some additional research he's done on the topic and four options he's come up with.

A week or so ago, I published an article entitled “In Search of an Anonymous Class Factory” about my efforts at writing a “factory” for PHP7’s new Anonymous Classes (extending a named concrete base class, and assigning Traits to it dynamically); and about how I subsequently discovered the expensive memory demands of my original factory code, and then rewrote it using a different and (hopefully) more memory-efficient approach.

Since then, I’ve run some tests for memory usage and timings to assess just how inefficient my first attempt at the factory code was, and whether the new version of the factory really was better than the original.

His four options that finally worked somewhat as he'd wanted were:

  • A factory that returns an instance of a concrete class using the traits he wants
  • A factory that returns an anonymous class extending a concrete class that uses the traits
  • His original Anonymous Class factory and extending the result with the traits
  • His second version of the Anonymous Class factory that creates the instance, caches it and returns a clone

He also includes the code he used to run the tests of each factory method and shares some of the resulting benchmarks (with a few surprises).

tagged: anonymous class factory results options benchmark

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2016/05/12/anonymous-class-factory-the-results-are-in/

Mark Baker:
In Search of an Anonymous Class Factory
May 03, 2016 @ 10:49:25

In a new post to his site Mark Baker take a look at anonymous classes, a new feature in PHP 7, and a challenge he took on to figure out how to apply traits to them at runtime.

One of the more interesting new features introduced to PHP with the arrival of version 7 is Anonymous Classes. [...] Then back in January (as I was waiting for my flight to the continent for PHPBenelux) I was intrigued by a request to find a way of dynamically applying Traits to a class at run-time. With time on my hands as I was sitting in the airport, I considered the problem.

His first idea was to build an anonymous class, extending the requested class that would come along with the traits/properties/functionality of the original class. He includes some of the code he tried to implement this solution and ultimately figured out that a factory would be a good approach to creating the structure. After doing some research he found a way to create the factory using some eval magic. However, this wasn't "the end of the story" as he found out some other interesting things about anonymous classes (such as the fact that they're linked to only one instance of a class, making them less reusable).

tagged: anonymous class php7 factory eval example

Link: https://markbakeruk.net/2016/05/03/in-search-of-an-anonymous-class-factory/

Rob Allen:
DI Factories for Slim controllers
Apr 28, 2016 @ 10:38:10

In a recent post to his site Rob Allen shows you how to create dependency injection factories for Slim (v3) controllers.

When using classes for route actions in Slim 3, I recommend using a single class for each route. However you can use a single class for multiple routes. To register a class method to a route you pass a string as the route callable where the class name is separate from method by a colon. Slim will retrieve MyController from the DI container and then call the listAction method using the usual signature. f you don't specify a method, then Slim will see if it treat the class as a callable, so you can implement __invoke() and then register the route.

He shows how to create a factory method as a part of the Slim container for a constructor and inject the correct dependencies. He shows how to register these dependencies as other factory methods inside the DI container and how to pull them back out for injection. He prefers this method as it reduces "hidden dependency" issues and makes the controllers themselves easier to test.

tagged: slim3 slimframework dependency injection container tutorial factory

Link: https://akrabat.com/di-factories-for-slim-controllers/