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Freek Lijten:
Final, private, a reaction
Jun 21, 2016 @ 10:39:37

In response to a few other posts about the use of "final" in PHP development, Freek Lijten has posted some of his own thoughts and some of the things he came to realize about its use in his own development.

I read a blog by Brandon Savage a couple of weeks ago and it triggered some thoughts. He refers to a blog by Marco Pivetta which basically states "Final all the things!". Brandon comes back with a more mild opinion where he offers the notion that this approach might be overkill. Since both posts got me thinking I tried to organise my thoughts on this in the following post.

Freek talks about a pretty common trend in the PHP world: the very rare use of "final". He suggests that "extension" of classes is a bad idea (or at least should be used a lot less) and how he has seen it commonly misused. He then shares two reasons why he thinks "final" is a good idea, mostly centering around how easy it is and how the Open/Closed principle applies. In the end, he notes that he'll be trying to use more "final" in the future and see where it takes him and his code.

tagged: final private reaction development practice class oop openclosed

Link: http://www.freeklijten.nl/2016/06/17/Final-private-a-reaction

Mathias Verraes:
Final Classes
May 13, 2014 @ 09:48:43

Mathias Verraes has posted some of his thoughts about using "final" in classes and what kind of impression it gives about your code.

I make all my classes final by default. I even configured the templates in my IDE prefix new classes with ‘final’. I’ve often explained my reasoning to people. A blog post is in order! A guiding principle here is Clarity of Intent. [...] The reason we need clean code, is not for the compiler. It’s to help our fellow developers, third parties, and even ourselves in six months time, understand the purpose and the design of our system.

He relates this concept of clean code and clarity back to the SOLID development principles, specifically the "Open/Closed Principle". This principle states that software should be open for extension but not for modification. It suggests that providing a stable, known API is a responsibility of the developer and using things like callbacks and listeners is a better way to extend. He gets into a bit more PHP-specific issues around using "final", including the difficulties that it can cause during testing.

tagged: final class inheritance extension solid openclosed principle

Link: http://verraes.net/2014/05/final-classes-in-php/

The Open/Closed Principle
Nov 08, 2012 @ 10:09:32

On PHPMaster.com there's a new post continuing their look at the SOLID development methodologies with the "O" in the acronym - the Open/Closed Principle:

I have to admit the first time I peeked at the academic definition of the Open/Closed Principle, its predicate was surprisingly clear to me. Leaving all of the technical jargon out of the picture, of course, its dictate was pretty much the mantra that we’ve heard so many times before: "Don’t hack the core". Well, admittedly there’s a pinch of ambiguity since there are at least two common approaches to keeping the “core” neatly preserved while extending its functionality. The first one (and why I used deliberately the term “extending”) would be appealing to Inheritance. [...] The second approach is Composition.

He illustrates the effective application of the principle with the creation of a HTML rendering class. The first version is non-polymorphic and just renders the example DIV and P elements that are passed into it. He changes this up by shifting these element classes into something extending an AbstractHtmlElement class (sharing an interface between them) and updating the renderer to handle these correctly.

tagged: solid design principle openclosed tutorial