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NetTuts.com:
Organizing Enterprise-Level Applications
October 01, 2012 @ 10:37:50

On NetTuts.com Jonathan Cutrell has posted some ideas for you to consider when designing your enterprise-level applications, regardless of the language(s) they're written in.

Organization can make or break the maintainability of an application. With smaller applications, organization is more obviously apparent; however, as the application grows and as the number of application developers and front-end engineers producing code increases, the more confusing organization can become. In this post, we will go over some basic concepts for keeping applications organized so that finding relevant code is an efficient and systematic process.

He's broken it up into a list of suggestions to make it a bit easier to take it all in:

  • Learn from Frameworks
  • Building a Standard
  • Uniformity of Connected Parts, Uniqueness of Discrete Parts
  • Another Note About Static Files
  • What Should Be Unique?

There's some good advice in there, especially around things like standards, naming conventions, site complexity and how much usage the site is likely to see.

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DZone.com:
Assetic JavaScript and CSS files management
August 05, 2011 @ 09:19:26

On DZone.com today Giorgio Sironi introduces you to Assetic, an asset management tool that helps you keep things organized and easily requested by your application.

Assetic is a PHP library for managing the deployment of your assets: JavaScript, CSS and other resources which will be requested by the browser. The library has been created by Kris Wallsmith from OpenSky, an e-shop where many of the active members of the PHP community work, or worked (see Jonathan Wage/Doctrine 1 and Bulat Shakirzyanov/Imagine.)

Giorgio compares it to the more traditional method (putting them in a public folder) and how Assetic gives you an advantage over this setup. The main feature of the tool is to bundle all of your assets into one file that is then sent to the browser and interpreted there reducing the need for HTTP calls to request multiple files. An example is included showing the creation of an asset collection and the output of the files all combined into one string.

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Paul Jones' Blog:
Include-Based vs Class-Based Architecture
March 14, 2011 @ 09:14:21

Paul Jones has a new post to his blog looking at two approaches to building applications in PHP - either using an include-based of class-based architecture, briefly looking at the advantages and disadvantages of each.

This is a topic I describe at length in my Organizing [Your PHP Projects] talk, but I would like to give the idea a home on my blog for easy reference.

He talks about the typical structure of a PHP application - at least where most start out - being the "include" method. He talks about the progression it usually makes into functions and classes and then, eventually, a jump in concept to the "class" method similar to what several popular frameworks have gone with.

The difference is that no program logic is executed at loading time with a class file. Loading the class file makes it available for use, but the programmer has to instantiate it and then call methods on it for anything else to happen.
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Lorna Mitchell's Blog:
Tips for Event Hosting Preparation
August 25, 2010 @ 12:41:39

Lorna Mitchell has had some experience at setting up and hosting tech-related events in the past and she wants to share some of the tips she's learned along the way to help make things easier for others in the same situation. This post is the first in that series - a look at some things to do to prepare before the event even starts.

For people organising events for the first time there are definitely some pitfalls that might not be obvious until you actually, well, until you fall into them! I thought I'd capture my experiences into a series of blog posts, in case they can help any future organisers to avoid some of the traps. First up: what to do before your event starts.

She makes a few recommendations such as getting a website for the event out early and include all of the important details right up front and picking a hashtag for the event so that folks on the various social media sites have a way to start developing the community around the event.

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Community News:
PHPBenelux Organizes TestFest 2010 (June 5th)
May 10, 2010 @ 14:04:48

The PHPBenelux group has officially announced the TestFest event they'll be holding for this year on June 5th (2010).

It has become a tradition for PHPBenelux to organize our instance of PHP TestFest, and this year will be no different! All PHP developers are invited to join us again this year for PHP TestFest 2010, which will take place in Maastricht on Saturday June 5th. Participating in the TestFest is completely free and open for everyone, members and non-members.

The only requirement is that participants must bring their own equipment to work on and that you have at least a little experience with writing PHP (you'll need it for the tests). This year's event will take place at Hoogbrugstraat 1 in Maastricht and will start around 10am and go until 4pm to try to get as many tests done as possible. Don't worry if you don't know how to write the tests - there'll be plenty of people to show you how!

If you'd like to attend the event, RSVP today so they can know how many to expect.

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Court Ewing's Blog:
Organize Your Project like a Pro with PHP Namespaces
April 19, 2010 @ 21:04:30

Court Ewing has put together a new post looking at using one of the more powerful (yet underused) features of the recent PHP releases - namespaces - to organize your code.

Prefixes serve their primary purpose well: when used correctly, they will ensure that your class names do not have naming conflicts. Unfortunately, they are long and pedantic, and provide no additional benefits. [...] Namespaces provide other benefits than shorter class names, though.

He illustrates with a well-structured example that makes it clear as to what resources are being used and how they're split out. His snippet defines the structure of the rest of the script without even a line of code in the class. He also briefly mentions the PHP 5.3 adoption levels and notes that several larger projects will be 5.3-only soon and will start to force the hand of developers and hosting companies.

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Stefan Koopmanschap's Blog:
Organizing your own conference
February 02, 2010 @ 12:48:36

In a recent post to his blog Stefan Koopmanschap talks about organizing a conference based on some of his experiences at this year's PHP Benelux Conference (2010) as an organizer.

It took us a bit longer than initially planned but by last summer, the plans started to take serious shape. We started working on a date, getting our CfP worked out, and contacted the first potential sponsors. We spread out the work over the nine people involved.

He walks you through every step of the way including how the Call for Papers went, coordination of attendees and speakers, and how all of the planning and preparation paid off when it came down to the actual time of the conference.

Man, what a blast. I have not regretted a single moment that I jumped into organizing this conference. And I'll do it again next year. Even worse, I'm doing it again before that, as I've also volunteered for helping in this year's SymfonyCamp. But it's going to be a blast. We'll be having fun. The stress is worth all of it and more.
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NETTUTS.com:
Organize Your Next PHP Project the Right Way
July 21, 2009 @ 08:39:00

NETTUTS.com has posted a few suggestions as to how you can organize your future PHP projects "the right way" and make them easier to maintain.

When starting out with PHP, it can be daunting figuring out how best to organize a project. If you've ever been confused with where to put your images, external libraries, or keeping your logic separate from your layout, then check out these tips; they'll get you heading in the right direction.

The tips include suggestions on things like the directory structure, a project-wide configuration file, creating the simple layout and templating code and an idea to use symlinks to point your web server to the most current directory for your code.

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AskAboutPHP.com:
CodeIgniter Organizing views simply
October 29, 2008 @ 15:35:08

New on the AskAboutPHP.com blog, this tutorial concerning CodeIgniter view organization has been posted:

Trying my hands at using CodeIgniter, one of the first obstacles I had was how to organize my 'blocks' on a page. Without knowing any better, I thought I had to reiterate the same view calls in every function within the controller, making the controller codes very messy. It turns out that CodeIgniter allows us to nest views within views, and that has made things a lot simpler for me.

Instead of loading and calling the view() method over and other in his actions, he chooses to make a "template" view with each of the other calls to view() contained inside. Then you just pass in the data you want the view to render and call that template view. This also allows you to easily create a site-wide template.

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Lukas Smith's Blog:
You can't always get what you want...
February 21, 2008 @ 11:13:00

Piggybacking on a recent proposal for traits in PHP, Lukas Smith has suggested something that could help make the organization of these sorts of contributions (and their "staying power") a bit more likely to happen - an official PHP.net wiki of sorts.

As such I really like what Stefan has done with his Traits proposal. Very nicely done. [...] Right now the RFC documents are hidden away in the unwieldy mailinglist archive and Stefan's private homepage, which could disappear any day. Of course there are also the various web archives, but what would be nice to have is a PHP.net wiki.

He notes that not only would this help protect information like this from dropping off the face of the web but it might also pave the way for some other changes to be made to the language (and to provide a space where everyone can share their ideas). He specifically mentions his wants for an array_merge_replace and a change to file_exists.

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