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Laravel News:
Learn about Grant Types in Laravel Passport
Aug 24, 2016 @ 10:46:49

On the Laravel News site today they've posted a tutorial helping you learn more about the grant types in the OAuth2 functionality provided by Laravel Passport.

OAuth2 is a security framework that controls access to protected areas of an application, and it’s mainly used to control how different clients consume an API ensuring they have the proper permissions to access the requested resources.

Laravel Passport is a full OAuth2 server implementation; it was built to make it easy to apply authentication over an API for laravel-based web applications.

For those not familiar with some of the terms around OAuth and its handling, they start with a few brief definitions (those that are familiar can skip them). Following this the post gets into the creation of a two kinds of grant handling with Passport: third-party authorizations and first-party applications (your own apps authenticating against the OAuth server). The post ends with a brief mention of creating access tokens manually, but points out that thing functionality should probably only be used during testing.

tagged: laravel passport oauth2 grant types password thirdparty server

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/08/passport-grant-types/

Alex Bilbie:
OAuth 2.0 Device Flow Grant
Apr 20, 2016 @ 11:58:50

In a new post to his site Alex Bilbie looks at a good approach to simplifying the OAuth 2 authorization flow for a device and some of the simple PHP that can power it.

When signing into apps and services on devices such as a Playstation or an Apple TV it can be immensely frustrating experience. Generally you will ordeal something similar to one of the following scenarios: The utterly terrible experience whereby you don’t have anything other than an onscreen keyboard [or] A slightly less terrible experience whereby you can pair a bluetooth keyboard to enter your username and that crazy long password.

[...] There are some apps however - such as Youtube for Apple TV - that have a much better end user experience.

He talks more about this better experience involving a simple code presented to the user, a special URL to link the device and the typical OAuth-ish authorization page to link the request to your account. He then explains how it would work with a PHP backend: making the request to the auth server, returning a message with the codes and URL to pass along and the "device code" it responds with. He also includes a few examples of error responses for polling too quickly, pending authorization and a denied request. This is all based on the (currently in draft) OAuth 2.0 Device Flow Grant currently in the works.

tagged: device flow grant oauth2 example draft standard authorization

Link: http://alexbilbie.com/2016/04/oauth-2-device-flow-grant