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Pascal MARTIN:
Series - Introduction to PHP 7.1 (Update)
Sep 15, 2016 @ 09:42:57

Pascal Martin has made the tenth post in his series covering PHP 7.1 and how it differs from previous versions. While this series was previously mentioned there have been significant updates to the series warranting a new post.

Here is the full list of the current ten articles he's written up so far:

There's lots of good information about this upcoming minor release in each of these articles as well as an interesting view into the release process for a new PHP version.

tagged: types enhancements testing overview preview articles series php71 update

Link: https://blog.pascal-martin.fr/post/php71-en-introduction-and-release-cycle.html

Pascal MARTIN:
Series - Introduction to PHP 7.1
Sep 08, 2016 @ 10:51:15

Pascal MARTIN has been in the process of posting a series of articles to his site covering the upcoming PHP 7.1 release including coverage of both new and deprecated features. So far there's four articles post with the latest coming out today:

A new minor version of PHP is just around the corner: PHP 7.1! Its release date is not really set yet, as it depends on the amount of bugs that will be reported and fixed on Releases Candidates, but it should happen before the end of this year. One year after PHP 7.0, this first minor release will bring its fair share of new enhancements!

Let’s take a look at those, going with about ten posts spread over the next few days.

So far he's covered:

Keep an eye on his site in the upcoming days for more pots in this series, helping you to prepare for the 7.1 release before it happens.

tagged: php71 series articles preview overview testing enhancements types

Link: https://blog.pascal-martin.fr/post/php71-en-introduction-and-release-cycle.html

Johannes Schlüter:
Types in PHP and MySQL
Sep 05, 2016 @ 13:38:21

Johannes Schlüter has a post to his site detailing the handling of types in PHP and MySQL and how they might act differently than expected in some situations.

Since PHP 7.0 has been released there's more attention on scalar types. Keeping types for data from within your application is relatively simple. But when talking to external systems, like a database things aren't always as one eventually might initially expect.

He talks about MySQL types and how they relate to the "network protocol" being used, converting everything to strings. He includes a few examples of hinting on the results, one where an integer is expected/string provided and another where a string was type hinted but an integer was returned. He points out that sometimes this is a limitation of what PHP can handle, not always what MySQL returns. He also includes other examples of returning decimals - sometimes as a number value and others as a string.

This leaves the question whether you should disable the emulation in order to get the correct types. Doing this has some impact on performance characteristics: With native prepared statements there will be a client-server round-trip during the prepare and another round-trip for the execute.
tagged: types typehinting mysql database string integer decimal preparedstatement pdo

Link: http://schlueters.de/blog/archives/182-Types-in-PHP-and-MySQL.html

Laravel News:
Learn about Grant Types in Laravel Passport
Aug 24, 2016 @ 10:46:49

On the Laravel News site today they've posted a tutorial helping you learn more about the grant types in the OAuth2 functionality provided by Laravel Passport.

OAuth2 is a security framework that controls access to protected areas of an application, and it’s mainly used to control how different clients consume an API ensuring they have the proper permissions to access the requested resources.

Laravel Passport is a full OAuth2 server implementation; it was built to make it easy to apply authentication over an API for laravel-based web applications.

For those not familiar with some of the terms around OAuth and its handling, they start with a few brief definitions (those that are familiar can skip them). Following this the post gets into the creation of a two kinds of grant handling with Passport: third-party authorizations and first-party applications (your own apps authenticating against the OAuth server). The post ends with a brief mention of creating access tokens manually, but points out that thing functionality should probably only be used during testing.

tagged: laravel passport oauth2 grant types password thirdparty server

Link: https://laravel-news.com/2016/08/passport-grant-types/

Matt Trask:
Looking at Ramsey UUID
Aug 24, 2016 @ 09:16:56

Matt Trask has put together a new post spotlighting a handy library that's widely used across the PHP ecosystem for generating UUIDs: ramsey/uuid.

Welcome to the first installment in my 2113918230981 part series, "Better know a Package!". Tonight's package: the famous/infamous Uuid package that that taught us all what Ramsey is in Scottish, Rhumsaa. Created to give PHP a library to generate Universal Unique Identifiers, this library has been a stallwort in the community. Ben Ramsey created it first under the Rhumsaa namesapce before moving it to the Ramsey namespace, saving us all from learning more Scottish then we needed to ever learn.

[...] A UUID, or Universally Unique Identifier, will generate a 128 bite unique key in different series based on the version you asked for. RFC-4122 dictates how Uuids should be generated, and recommends 4 types.

Matt then goes on to describe each of the different UUID types and provides some code examples as illustration:

  • Version 1: Time and MAC addressed based Uuid
  • Version 2: DCE-based
  • Version 3: UUIDs based on a namespace and then it is MD5 hashed
  • Version 4: Random generation (based on the output of random_bytes

He also includes examples of the UUIDs output by each method (not much difference there as the structure of the resulting UUID is all the same).

tagged: uuid ramsey library introduction types namespace random mac time tutorial

Link: http://matthewtrask.net/blog/Looking-At-Ramsey-Uuid/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Can We Have Static Types in PHP without PHP 7 or HHVM?
Jul 26, 2016 @ 11:34:57

On the SitePoint PHP blog Younes Rafie asks the question "Can we have static types in PHP without PHP 7 or HHVM?" One of the main features introduced by both of these versions (or platforms) is the ability to type things strictly and enforce more correct data handling. Previously PHP has been a "lazy typing" language and would regularly shift the type of a variable depending on the immediate need. Obviously, this can lead to unpredictable behavior.

Now that PHP 7 has been out for a while with interesting features like error handling, null coalescing operator, scalar type declarations, etc., we often hear the people still stuck with PHP 5 saying it has a weak typing system, and that things quickly become unpredictable.

Even though this is partially true, PHP allows you to keep control of your application when you know what you’re doing.

They show how, through a series of examples, to add a bit of additional validation with exceptions to ensure the input is the correct type. However this can be a bit more time consuming and difficult to remember so the team at Box put together the augmented types extension that brings some of the static typing to PHP 5.x. They help you get it installed and working in your PHP installation and include an example of it in use with DocBlock-based type hints. The extension provides handling for the basic types as well as arrays, multiple arguments, default values and return types.

tagged: static types php7 hhvm extension augmented types tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/can-we-have-static-types-in-php-without-php-7-or-hhvm/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Can We Have Static Types in PHP without PHP 7 or HHVM?
Jul 26, 2016 @ 11:34:57

On the SitePoint PHP blog Younes Rafie asks the question "Can we have static types in PHP without PHP 7 or HHVM?" One of the main features introduced by both of these versions (or platforms) is the ability to type things strictly and enforce more correct data handling. Previously PHP has been a "lazy typing" language and would regularly shift the type of a variable depending on the immediate need. Obviously, this can lead to unpredictable behavior.

Now that PHP 7 has been out for a while with interesting features like error handling, null coalescing operator, scalar type declarations, etc., we often hear the people still stuck with PHP 5 saying it has a weak typing system, and that things quickly become unpredictable.

Even though this is partially true, PHP allows you to keep control of your application when you know what you’re doing.

They show how, through a series of examples, to add a bit of additional validation with exceptions to ensure the input is the correct type. However this can be a bit more time consuming and difficult to remember so the team at Box put together the augmented types extension that brings some of the static typing to PHP 5.x. They help you get it installed and working in your PHP installation and include an example of it in use with DocBlock-based type hints. The extension provides handling for the basic types as well as arrays, multiple arguments, default values and return types.

tagged: static types php7 hhvm extension augmented types tutorial

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/can-we-have-static-types-in-php-without-php-7-or-hhvm/

Josh Justice:
Approaches to Testing: A Survey
Feb 08, 2016 @ 10:49:23

On the CodingItWrong site Josh Justice has written up an interesting article about the different "schools" of testing and the approaches they take. While it's not specific to PHP testing, a lot of the principles still apply.

The last few months have been my first opportunity to do automated testing at my full-time job. As I’ve been trying to get the hang of it, my biggest question has been how many of each type to test to write: how many unit, integration, and acceptance tests. Turns out Folks Got Opinions™ on this! As I researched, I found at least four different approaches to testing, and they each provide different answers to a number of questions I had.

His research answered questions about what the different types are, what processes are used to create tests and what to check for. He also answered question about how to change code based on what you find during testing and what "good code" is. HE then breaks down the rest of the article into the four different types of software testing he found during his research:

  • Test Approach #1: Whatever it is DHH does.
  • Test Approach #2: Classical TDD
  • Test Approach #3: Mockist TDD
  • Test Approach #4: Discovery Testing

Each sections includes a summary of the testing practices, links to some other resources on the topic and an illustration of the typical flow when writing the tests.

tagged: testing survey approach types tdd classical mockist discovery dhh

Link: http://codingitwrong.com/2016/02/08/approaches-to-testing-a-survey.html

Joshua Thjissen:
Understanding Symfony2 Forms
Sep 14, 2015 @ 09:28:50

Joshua Thjissen has a post on his site that wants to help you understand the basics of Symfony2 forms including how to build them, extend them and the modules they're made up of.

To actually use Symfony2 forms, all you need to do is read some documentation, a few blog posts and you’ll be up and running in a couple of minutes. Understanding Symfony2 forms however, is a whole different ballgame. In order to understand a seemingly simple process of “adding fields to a form”, we must understand a lot of the basic foundation of the Symfony2 Form component. In these blog posts, I’ll try and give some more insights on this foundation.

He starts by explaining the three main steps in the typical form lifecycle: building the form itself, populating and validating data and rendering the form to the waiting user. He then gets into some of the basics of using forms and the types of objects that make them up. He includes examples of creating a simple form, the YAML configuration it compiles to and the functions used to build, render and set options on the form. He finishes up the post looking at form inheritance, extending the form types and where the "ResolvedFormType" comes in to play.

tagged: symfony2 form understand overview types build render validate populate

Link: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl/2015/09/11/understanding-symfony2-forms/

Vertabelo.com:
ORMs under the hood
Aug 26, 2015 @ 09:55:01

The Vertabelo site has posted a tutorial that gives you an "under the hood" view of ORMs and what they're doing in the background to help make accessing your database information easier.

It often happens that if something is loved, it is also hated with the same power. The idea of object relational mapping fits into this concept perfectly. You will definitely come across many opposite points and fierce discussions as well as unwavering advocates and haters. So if you have ever asked whether to use ORM or not, the answer “it depends” will not be enough.

They start with a definition of an ORM to get everyone on the same page, highlighting how they represent database contents and what some of the benefits are in using them. From there the article talks about the importance of good SQL and a few common dangers in using an ORM and not knowing SQL. Then the article gets into how ORMs work and some of the common design patterns they can implement. It lists some of the more popular ORMs (for Python, Java and PHP) and covers some of the main disadvantages to their use. The article ends with examples of some of the libraries mentioned, highlighting the Propel ORM for the PHP world.

tagged: orm behindthescenes introduction advantages disadvantages types propel example

Link: http://www.vertabelo.com/blog/technical-articles/orms-under-the-hood