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Christian Weiske:
PHP 5.6 Large file upload support
December 11, 2013 @ 11:09:47

Christian Weiske has posted information about a feature in the upcoming PHP 5.6 version of the language - large file upload support. This new feature allows files over 4GB to be uploaded correctly.

PHP version 5.6 brings support for file uploads larger than 2GiB. We can say "thank you" to Ralf Lang for the initial patch that fixes bug #44522 , which was open since 2008. During testing uploads of files with a size of 4 - 11GiB on my PHP-CGI setup, I noticed that files above 4GiB did not get uploaded correctly. Michael Wallner was quick to fix that bug, and now 5.6 has fully working support for big files.

PHP 5.6 is still in development and some other new features are slated to be added to it. You can find some of them listed in the RFC section of the PHP wiki.

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php56 large file upload bug patch

Link: http://cweiske.de/tagebuch/php-large-file-uploads.htm

Ilia Alshanetsky's Blog:
Performance Analysis of isset() vs array_key_exists()
March 06, 2012 @ 08:44:31

Ilia Alshanetsky has posted about a performance difference he's found between using the isset and array_key_exists functions in PHP to see if a value exists.

At Confoo I had an interesting conversation with Guilherme Blanco regarding the fact that in Doctrine 2 they had a performance issue due to usage of array_key_exists() and how it was significantly slower than isset(). His anecdotal example was that doing isset() took 0.5 seconds, while array_key_exists() for the same operation took 5 seconds! That seemed wrong [...] so, I've decided to do a quick benchmark using a 5,000 element array.

His benchmarking code is included - it just loads up a simple data set from a file of "words" and measures the microtime between the isset and array_key_exists calls. His results do show that isset is the faster of the two (by 2.5x) but it's still a super small micro-optimization that won't gain you much in the end.

The bottom line is that if your application does not need to distinguish between an array key that does not exist and one whose value happens to be NULL you should use isset() because it happens to be a little faster.
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isset arraykeyexists benchmark large array code


Kevin Schroeder's Blog:
fatal The remote end hung up unexpectedly
November 04, 2011 @ 12:55:28

Kevin Schroeder has a quick tip for anyone using phpcloud.com and having trouble with git and "remote end hung up" error messages.

If you are using phpcloud.com and are experiencing errors with git [...] and you are trying to push large files (not sure what is defined as "large") you may need to change some git settings.

He points out two settings - one for Windows and the other for Linux - that increase the buffer size to handle larger files that might be included in your repository.

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phpcloud git problem large file buffer size


Martin Sikora's Blog:
Storing arrays using JSON, serialize and var_export
August 09, 2011 @ 09:31:51

Martin Sikora was working on an application that used a large dataset (in an array) and found some interesting things in regards to PHP's resulting loading time and saving time in four different types of arrays.

Recently I was dealing with precessing and storing large arrays in PHP (around 100 000 items) and I found out some quiet surprising facts that are very useful in performance critical applications. [...] When I started looking for some benchmark I found article Cache a large array: JSON, serialize or var_export?. That is really good but I wanted to compare a few more things.

He tested with four different array types including associative with an integer value and numeric index with a string value at sizes of 10, 100, 1,000 and 10,000 items. He ran his tests with the json methods, serializing them and a var_export. There's graphs of his results for each included in the post with some interesting variations between the different array types.

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json serialize varexport large array dataset benchmark


Community News:
ElePHPants - the Next generation
December 17, 2010 @ 06:52:22

If you've been trying to get your hands on one of the cuddly little mascots for PHP (the elePHPant) but haven't managed to yet, there's some good news! Another run of the fuzzy little animals is being done (the 6th) and this time they're offering something new - pink elePHPants.

As we are now out of every of the 5 first generation of the elephpants, it is time to start a 6th. You'll find here all information to include yourself. [...] Fill in your elephpants wishes. We do not need any payement now. We will contact you directly before starting the generation for the actual payement.

Their schedule hopes to end the pre-order process on December 20th (just three days away) and to strat production on these pre-orders by January 10th. The end results would be shipped out for delivery in April 2011. If you'd like to lay claim to some of your own, go over to the order form and select the size (large/small) and the color (blue/pink) and fill in the contact info. Unfortunately, because of production restrictions, single elePHPants cannot be ordered, so consider getting together with a local user group and all chipping in for a box!

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elephpant order preorder pink blue large small animal


SitePoint PHP Blog:
How to Upload Large Files in PHP
August 17, 2010 @ 08:44:18

On the SitePoint PHP blog today Craig Buckler talks about uploading large files in your PHP application. He points to two other resources - this manual page and this introductory tutorial about handling file uploads to get the ball rolling.

One of the most popular uses is image uploads. Your users can submit photographs from a form without resorting to FTP or other convoluted methods. HTML5 and Flash also permit drag and drop, so the operation is likely to become easier as browsers evolve. This is where the problems can begin.

He points out the large size of the images most modern cameras work with and how PHP, with its basic settings, can't handle a lot of the resulting images. He mentions the upload_max_filesize and post_max_size settings you can set in either your php.ini or via an .htaccess (or even in your script). There's also a few helpful comments with more tips on large file handling.

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upload large file tutorial phpini setting


Programming Facts Blog:
Upload large(Big) files in PHP using .htaccess
February 17, 2010 @ 13:19:06

Rakshit Patel has posted a tip to the Programming Facts blog that those out there wanting to upload larger files through your application - change your settings via one of three ways to tell PHP it's okay.

I have seen many developers who find difficulties when working with larger files upload in php. When files which are too large in size [...] If you are uploading file which is larger than 2MB size than here i am showing you the way to upload larger files using PHP.

The method's pretty much the same in each of the three methods. You can either have the settings in your httpd.conf (if you have access to it), in the php.ini or in a .htaccess file in the directory your PHP script is in.

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upload large file tutorial phpini httpdconf htaccess


Rob Young's Blog:
Chunking Large Queries with Iterators in PHP
October 07, 2009 @ 10:42:02

Since sometimes you just don't want all of the results of a query back at once, Rob Young has posted a solution of his own using the Iterators included with PHP as a part of the SPL. His solution is to wrap it in a ChunkedQueryIterator that handles the work behind the scenes.

When executing large queries it's usually best not to load the whole result set in one go. Memory isn't infinite and PHP isn't renowned for handling it very well. So the obvious answer is to chunk the large query in to lots of smaller queries. [...] We want something to which we can just provide a PDO object, an SQL query and the chunk size. We should then be able to iterate over the resulting object as though it were a single result set.

He includes two code snippets of it in action, but asks the question of his readers - "How do you handle large database queries?" - to get some feedback on other alternatives.

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chunk large query iterator pdo


Laknath Semage's Blog:
PHP + Large files
December 02, 2008 @ 12:07:08

Laknath Semage submitted a new blog post he's written up about working with large file uploads in your PHP applications.

If we want to do large file uploads or database updates with PHP there are few configurations to be done to default settings and I'm putting this as a note to myself (I'm always keep forgetting this) as well as to any one who may find this useful like when importing a large backup file through phpMyAdmin.

There's four php.ini settings he recommends checking as well as two values to change if you do have the need to upload a large import file back into a phpMyAdmin installation (ExecTimeLimit, MemoryLimit).

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large file upload phpmyadmin phpini setting


Nexen.net:
Elephpants, 2008 generation
May 02, 2008 @ 17:12:40

So you've seen all of the pictures of the elePHPants floating around and want to get your hands on one of your very own? Good news! Damien Seguy and crew have another fresh batch of huggable blue PHPness on the way and you can place your order now:

If you have missed the boat of the first generation of elePHPants, now is the right time to catchup up and participate to the 2008 generation! As for the first generation, this project is open to every PHP User group and aficionados, that want to adopt elePHPants, small or big.

Pricing is 4 Euros per elephant (in a 50 count box only) or 50 Euro for one of the larger elephants. They're even open to having company logos ("your own brood") added to the other side of his back. You can find more details on getting your hands on one at this page on the Nexen.net website or just head right to the order form to get a little blue PHPer to call your own.

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