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Symfony Finland:
Adding a GraphQL API to your Symfony Flex application
Dec 01, 2017 @ 11:49:05

On the Symfony Finland site there's a new post sharing a tutorial showing how to add a GraphQL API to your application with the help of the overblog/graphql-bundle bundle.

I've been using GraphQL for some API thingamajigs, and it's been working fine. Now with Symfony 4 out, I figured a write-up on how to use GraphQL with Symfony Flex could be useful for someone.

We'll expand on a previous demo app that I built. That app already uses Doctrine ORM as storage, so let's bridge that to a GraphQL API.

He starts by linking to "a quick read" about GraphQL for those not familiar and listing out the basic structure of the application he'll build out. Next comes the installation of the bundle and a debug bundle to help make it easier to locate errors. He then updates the application configuration to add routes and define the schema for the objects in the system. Using the GUI that comes with the debug package, he shows how to access the API and how to create a "resolver" that will relay the information back to the client from the GraphQL API request.

tagged: symfony graphql api symfonyflex tutorial bundle debug gui

Link: https://symfony.fi/entry/adding-a-graphql-api-to-your-symfony-flex-app

Symfony Finland:
State of GraphQL PHP libraries and Symfony integrations in 2017
Nov 15, 2017 @ 11:16:39

On the Symfony Finland site, there's a post that looks at the current state of GraphQL PHP libraries in 2017 and how they are integrated with applications using the Symfony framework.

GraphQL has continued to gain momentum over the course of 2017. While it's certainly not a replacement for REST in all cases, it does provide consumers of Content APIs, etc. better ergonomics than general purpose RESTful interfaces. For PHP there are currently two popular libraries, both of which have Symfony integration Bundles.

The post starts by talking about implementing GraphQL functionality in your own application and mentions the two main libraries currently used: Webonyx GraphQL PHP and Youshido GraphQL. It goes on to talk about the integrations both of these provide as bundles and a bit about what each has to offer. The post then wraps up with a look forward to the Symfony Flex support they provide and a few links to other resources about GraphQL and its use in Symfony applications.

tagged: symfony framework graphql library bundle webonyx yushido

Link: https://symfony.fi/entry/state-of-graphql-php-libraries-and-symfony-integrations-in-2017

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Symfony Flex: Paving the Path to a Faster, Better Symfony
Oct 19, 2017 @ 13:16:52

On the SitePoint PHP Blog, there's a tutorial posted from editor Bruno Skvorc giving an introduction to Symfony Flex and how it is "paving the way" to a more performant future for Symfony.

Symfony Flex is a modern replacement for the Symfony Installer and not the name of the next Symfony version.

Internally, Symfony Flex is a Composer plugin that modifies the behavior of the require and update commands. When installing or updating dependencies in a Flex-enabled application, Symfony can perform tasks before and after the execution of Composer tasks.

The new Symfony will be called just Symfony 4, and while this tutorial will deal only with the Flex tool, it will mention some Symfony 4 upgrades as well.

The tutorial starts with some of the basics about Flex including its current development status and what kinds of things have changed from previous Symfony setups. It then walks you through the creation of a new Flex application including the bootstrapping of the application and the setup and use of application bundles.

tagged: symfony flex symfonyflex introduction tutorial bundle bootstrap

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/symfony-flex-paving-path-faster-better-symfony/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Introducing the Neo4j Symfony Bundle
Aug 07, 2017 @ 13:25:34

On the SitePoint PHP blog they've posted a tutorial from author Tobias Nyholm introducing the Neo4j bundle for Symfony-based application. This bundle provides functionality to work with Neo4j graph databases natively in the application.

There is no such thing as disconnected information, no matter where you look – people, events, places, things, documents, applications and the information about them is all heavily connected. As the volume of data grows, so does the number and dynamicity of its connections. And if you’ve tried in the past to store and query that highly connected, semi-structured data in any database, you probably experienced a lot of challenges.

The tutorial talks some about graph databases, how they work and what kind of data fits into them best. It also briefly covers the Cypher Query Language followed by an introduction to the bundle and what it has to offer. Code examples of putting the bundle to use for queries are provided including the models to handle the results, relationships and an example application you can use to start with a working example.

tagged: tutorial bundle symfony introduction neo4j database

Link: https://www.sitepoint.com/introducing-the-neo4j-symfony-bundle/

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: A quick Demo
May 05, 2017 @ 09:39:52

Fabien Potencier has continued his post series covering the next major release of the Symfony framework, Symfony 4. In this latest post he walks you through a quick demonstration of the creation of a new Symfony 4 application including a simple administration system.

Time to test Symfony 4... or at least let's test the experience of developing Symfony 4 projects with Symfony 3.3. Keep in mind that all the tools are in preview mode. Features might evolve over time. I'm waiting for your feedback! The first stable version of Symfony Flex will not be released before Symfony 4 at the end of November 2017. It gives the community plenty of time to discuss the changes I have described in this series of blog posts.

He then walks through the process for creating the application:

  • Using Composer's "create-project" to make a new skeleton application
  • Setting it up as a git repository
  • Defining environment variables
  • Registering the framework bundle
  • Installing the command line tools

With the basic application set up he then shows how to install the EasyAdminBundle to create the simple administrative interface. He's also created a screencast showing this same process so you can see it all in action.

tagged: symfony4 demo screencast skeleton application bundle install

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-demo.html

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: Best Practices
Apr 10, 2017 @ 11:51:34

Fabien Potencier (creator of the Symfony framework) has a new post on his site continuing his look at Symfony 4. In this latest article he looks at some of the best practices to use in the next major release of the framework based on some of the architectural changes coming down the line.

Any major version of a project is an opportunity to revisit its best practices. Modernizing them. Adapting them to the project's new features. Symfony 4 is no exception.

He breaks it up into a few different sections offering tips around each, just to get you thinking about the path ahead with v4 releases:

  • Standardization first (using more standard tools)
  • Bundle-less Applications
  • Environment Variables
  • Unified Web Front Controller
  • Makefile
  • Assets Management

Each item includes a description of some of the changes coming and what behaviors you'll need to modify to make life smoother in the Symfony 4 transition.

tagged: symfony4 bestpractice list framework standardize bundle environment makefile assets

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-best-practices.html

Fabien Potencier:
Symfony 4: Monolith vs Micro
Apr 05, 2017 @ 09:43:14

Fabien Potencier is back with a new post on his site following up this article about application composition and Symfony 4. In his latest post he compares two approaches to applications: micro versus macro.

Monolith projects versus micro-applications; a never-ending debate. Both ways to develop applications are fine in my book. Symfony supports both. Even if the Symfony Standard Edition is probably more suitable for monolith projects as it depends on the symfony/symfony package.

[...] Silex took another approach where each individual components are required when needed. Does it make Silex simpler, more lightweight, or faster than Symfony? No. Nevertheless, Symfony 4 is going to be more similar to Silex in this regard.

He talks about changes upcoming in Symfony 4 including the move away from the "symfony/symfony" package system and in with a component/bundle driven system. He gets into a specific example around the "symfony-framework" bundle. He then comes back around to the idea of "composition" of applications, adding Symfony dependencies only when needed but still having them work together seamlessly. The post ends with a discussion that was had about going the "bundle-less application" route and, while Symfony 4 will recommend it, the bundle system will still function as expected.

tagged: symfony symfony4 bundle application micro macro framework

Link: http://fabien.potencier.org/symfony4-monolith-vs-micro.html

Robert Basic:
Loading fixtures for a Symfony app in Behat tests
Mar 23, 2017 @ 10:38:58

Robert Basic has a new post to his site with some advice for the Behat users out there testing their Symfony applications. He shows how to easily load up fixture data with the help of Doctrine.

Performing end to end testing of any application requires from us to have a set of reliable test data in the database.

If we write a Symfony application and use Behat to do the end to end testing, the we can use the Doctrine fixtures bundle to create the required fixture loaders and load them in our Behat scenarios when required.

He walks you through the installation of the Doctrine fixtures bundle (via Composer, naturally) and how to enable it via the Symfony kernel configuration. He then includes an example of the fixture loader class from the FOSUserBundle and how it works. Next up is the installation of the Behat Symfony 2 extension and a bit of extra code to make a new feature context for Behat containing a "loadDataFixtures" method to do the heavy lifting.

tagged: fixture symfony application behat load extension bundle tutorial

Link: https://robertbasic.com/blog/loading-fixtures-for-a-symfony-app-in-behat-tests/

Eleven Labs Blog:
RabbitMQ: Publish, Consume, and Retry Messages
Feb 03, 2017 @ 12:53:06

On the Eleven Labs blog they're posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate RabbitMQ functionality into your Symfony-based application making use of a few handy tools that do some of the heavy lifting for you and how messages are handled (and what to do when they error).

RabbitMQ is a message broker, allowing to process things asynchronously. There’s already an article written about it, if you’re not familiar with RabbitMQ.

What I’d like to talk to you about is the lifecycle of a message, with error handling. Everything in a few lines of code. Therefore, we’re going to configure a RabbitMQ virtual host, publish a message, consume it and retry publication if any error occurs.

They use the RabbitMQ admin toolkit and Swarrot packages to get the job done. First up is the configuration of the tools, creating a default_vhost.yml file defining a queue and setting up the exchanges and parameters for the default route ("/"). They show an example of what the RabbitMQ UI looks like with this new exchange up and working and how to get more information about this "default" queue. Next up is the consumption and publication of messages. They include an example app/config/config.yml file that defines some settings the Swarrot library (via the SwarrotBundle) needs to understand the connections, consumers and type of provider to use. Finally he shows the configuration so it all knows how to publish messages and a quick example of PHP code that sends a simple string message to be handled by the RabbitMQ workers. The post ends with a bit more configuration and some examples of how to handle errors in this Swarrot/RabbitMQ Admin Toolkit setup and making use of some middleware to help with message retries and number of attempts.

tagged: tutorial rabbitmq symfony bundle swarrot configuration publish consume retry error

Link: http://blog.eleven-labs.com/en/rabbitmq-publish-consume-retry-messages/

Stovepipe Systems:
What are Bundles in Symfony?
Dec 06, 2016 @ 10:22:56

On the Stovepipe Systems Dev blog today Iltar van der Berg has shared a post about bundles, one of the key concepts in the Symfony ecosystem - what they are and some of the common features they all share.

People often refer to bundles as modules or re-usable code for Symfony applications. When a developer has experience with Symfony1 or another framework with the module concept, it might seem logical that this is what a bundle represents in Symfony.

So what is a bundle? When do you need one and what can it do? What's the difference between an AppBundle and a vendor Bundle?

He starts with the release of Symfony 2, including bundle support, and how common practices created hard dependencies between bundles. This created issues in the applications and reusability of the bundles (their whole purpose) so a solution was created: the AppBundle. This bundle shifted the emphasis away from the file structure of the bundles and more towards the domain they occupied, handling some "magic" references automatically for you.

As mentioned, the bundle provides an extension point. Other bundles for example, can hook in on your bundle because it contains some logic to expose information such as the directory of the bundle.

[...] The main purpose of a bundle however, is to provide an extension point for the Dependency Injection Container. When talking about this extension point, it revolves around adding, changing or removing service definitions.

tagged: symfony bundle introduction appbundle vendor

Link: https://stovepipe.systems/post/what-are-bundles-in-symfony