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That Podcast:
Episode 30: ...
Apr 25, 2016 @ 09:47:48

That Podcas, hosted by PHP community members Beau Simensen and Dave Marshall, has posted their latest episode - Episode #30: ....

Beau and Dave talk about Beau's recent trip to Cornwall, some family stuff like schools, Linux binaries on windows, parallelshell woes, cloud formation woes and FounderDating.com.

Other topics mentioned in this episode include:

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly for listening at your leisure. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed too.

tagged: thatpodcast ep30 cornwall school linux binary parallelshell cloudformation podcast

Link: https://thatpodcast.io/episodes/episode-30

Microsoft.com:
Announcing SQL Server on Linux
Mar 08, 2016 @ 10:20:24

It's not specific to the world of PHP but there was a major announcement from Microsoft yesterday about one of their products, SQL Server, and how they're officially brining it to Linux.

Today I’m excited to announce our plans to bring SQL Server to Linux as well. This will enable SQL Server to deliver a consistent data platform across Windows Server and Linux, as well as on-premises and cloud. We are bringing the core relational database capabilities to preview today, and are targeting availability in mid-2017.

[...] Bringing SQL Server to Linux is another way we are making our products and new innovations more accessible to a broader set of users and meeting them where they are.

Currently the release is in a private preview stage but more information on the release and how you can get it to install on your systems will be released in the coming months. You can sign up for updates and get more information about the product on the project website on Microsoft.com.

tagged: sqlserver linux release announcement microsoft

Link: https://blogs.microsoft.com/blog/2016/03/07/announcing-sql-server-on-linux/

Larry Garfield:
Composer vs. Linux Distributions: A Mental Model Battle
Feb 25, 2016 @ 11:41:11

In his latest post Larry Garfield talks about the Composer problem that was recently brought up by the Gentoo linux project and is related to how Composer packages and system-level shared libraries differ.

This is not a new complaint; Other distributions have complained about Composer's impact before. But fundamentally I think the issue stems from having the wrong mental model of how modern PHP works when viewed from a distribution or sysadmin perspective.

In a recent heated GitHub thread, several people referred to PHP "linking" to 3rd party libraries, as if they were shared C libraries. That is simply not the case. Neither "static linking" nor "dynamic linking" really applies to PHP. From a sysadmin perspective, PHP is closer to highly complicated bash scripts than anything else.

Larry starts with a bit of history on the subject, pointing out the two methods most developers used PHP code: copy/pasted from the web or installed via PEAR. He talks about the common issues with both approaches. He then talks about how modern PHP development and Composer related and how, from a sysadmin perspective, Composer is the "compile" step of PHP and only supports static links. He also makes some suggestions to the distribution packagers around how to handle these system-level Composer dependencies (and how to treat it like a "binary" if needed).

The mistake here is trying to treat dependent packages of modern PHP applications like shared libraries. They're not. The community has spoken, and PHP simply doesn't work that way anymore. Fighting that is a losing battle. But by viewing composer as a compiler, distributions can still slot PHP into their typical workflows and get all of the security update ease that they're looking for.
tagged: composer linux distribution mental model shared library system dependency gentoo

Link: http://www.garfieldtech.com/blog/composer-distribution-mental-model

Softpedia.com:
Debian Is Moving to PHP 7, and So Are Numerous Other Linux Distributions
Jan 18, 2016 @ 10:48:36

According to this new article on the Softpedia site, Debian and several other major Linux distributions will soon be making the move up to PHP 7 for their releases, the latest major version of the PHP language.

The Debian developers have publicly announced their plans to migrate all of the PHP 5 to the brand new and powerful PHP 7 release, as well as to change the PHP packaging to allow co-installable versions.

The announcement was made by Debian developer Ond?ej Surý a few couple of days ago on one of Debian Project's mailing lists, where he informs Debian devs about the changes made to the PHP packaging for the operating system, in the pkg-php packaging group.

In fact, PHP 7 has already made it to the unstable releases of the Debian linux distribution for those that would like to test things out. You can find out more of the specifics in this mailing list post on their implementation plans.

tagged: debian php7 migration mailinglist linux unstable

Link: http://news.softpedia.com/news/debian-is-moving-to-php-7-and-so-are-numerous-other-linux-distributions-498951.shtml

Jack Skinner:
PHP Version Roundup - PHP Install Statistics for 2015
Dec 09, 2015 @ 10:43:49

Jack Skinner has posted his latest "roundup" results of the most popularly installed versions of PHP across the web. In the post he looks through the percentage of installations for each version and how many are "secure" (currently supported and in a popular/stable linux distribution).

Last year, Anthony Ferrara posted an excellent round up of PHP versions in the wild, specifically focusing on the volume of un-patched versions running production websites. Even as an estimate it was an eyeopening moment for many people.

Using data from w3techs and, while the raw data isn't posted, what's there is good enough for an estimation. He talks some about the definition of "secure" in the context of the results and lists the current versions of several popular linux distributions and the versions they support. His results are then grouped by minor release and created some graphs for the results to help with visualization. The remainder of the post shares these results for PHP versions 5.6, 5.5, 5.4, 5.3 and yes even 5.2/5.1. The results end with overall numbers/graphs of the most widely installed versions and what percentage of those are considered "secure". With PHP 7 just released the results are a little discouraging but it is good to see things trending the right way since last year's results.

tagged: version roundup install popular language secure linux supported w3techs

Link: https://developerjack.com/blog/2015/12/09/php-version-roundup/

ServerGrove Blog:
Useful Linux command-line tools to work with PHP projects
Apr 24, 2015 @ 11:16:20

The ServerGrove blog has posted a new tutorial with a selection of useful command line tools to help you in working with your PHP applications. None of them are PHP specific but are Unix-based commands that can help in every day development.

Linux provides a lot of interesting command-line tools that we can use when working with PHP projects. In this post we give you some useful commands.

They include examples of commands that can help with:

  • Find all PHP files in the current directory
  • Check the syntax of all PHP files in the current directory
  • Get the size of each Composer dependency
  • Find suspicious PHP files
  • Find files with abstract classes
  • List PHP settings for the xdebug extension
  • Find empty files and/or directories
  • List files currently open by a PHP process

As mentioned, most of the tools themselves are not PHP specific but these example commands do relate to things that are more in a PHP context.

tagged: useful linux commandline tool context example list

Link: http://blog.servergrove.com/2015/04/23/useful-linux-command-line-tools-work-php-projects/

Remi Collet:
PHP 7.0 as Software Collection
Mar 26, 2015 @ 10:15:48

Remi Collet has a new post today talking about the next major release of the PHP language - PHP 7 - and how it, in its current state, can be installed now as an RPM from the "remi" repository as a software collection.

RPM of upcoming major version of PHP 7.0, are available in remi repository for Fedora 20, 21, 22 and Enterprise Linux 6, 7 (RHEL, CentOS, ...) in a fresh new Software Collection (php70) allowing its installation beside the system version. As I strongly believe in SCL potential to provide a simple way to allow installation of various versions simultaneously, and as I think it is useful to offer this feature to allow developers to test their applications, to allow sysadmin to prepare a migration or simply to use this version for some specific application, I decide to create this new SCL.

Instructions for the installation (via yum) are included and a list of some things "to be noticed" about the setup are also included.

tagged: php7 software collection fedora enterprise linux rpm yum install remi repository

Link: http://blog.famillecollet.com/post/2015/03/25/PHP-7.0-as-Software-Collection

DigitalOcean Community Blog:
How To Set Up a Two Node LEPP Stack on CentOS 7
Mar 25, 2015 @ 11:52:30

On the DigitalOcean community blog they've posted a guide to setting up a LEPP server (Linux, Nginx, PHP and PostgreSQL) on a CentOS 7 instance (not specific to their own platform either, can be applied anywhere).

In this tutorial, we will create a simple web application in a two-tier architecture. Our base operating system for both nodes will be CentOS 7. The site will be powered by an Nginx web server running PHP code that talks to a PostgreSQL database. Instead of adopting a "top-down" approach seen in other LAMP or LEMP tutorials, we will use a "ground-up" approach: we will create a database tier first, then the web server and then see how the web server can connect to the database. We will call this configuration a LEPP (Linux, Nginx, PHP, PostgreSQL) stack.

They create a two-tier setup that involves the use of two CentOS systems (with examples from their own hosting options) and walk you through:

  • Installing PostgreSQL
  • Configuring PostgreSQL
  • Updating the Database Server Firewall
  • Creating and Populating the Database
  • Installing Nginx
  • Updating the Web Server Firewall
  • Configuring Nginx
  • Installing PHP
  • Configuring PHP
  • Creating the Web Application

It seems like a lot of steps but all of the necessary commands and configuration updates are included in each step so it's basically a copy and paste kind of walk-through.

tagged: tutorial centos leep linux nginx php postgresql walkthrough

Link: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-a-two-node-lepp-stack-on-centos-7

Ben Ramsey:
Setting Up Jenkins on Amazon Linux for PHP Testing
Aug 08, 2014 @ 09:36:33

Ben Ramsey has posted a complete walk-through of setting up and configuring Jenkins on an AWS instance for testing your PHP applications.

One of my first tasks at ShootProof was to set up a Jenkins server for continuous integration and get it ready to run unit tests for PHP and JavaScript code. There are plenty of tutorials around the web to help you do just that. This is yet another one, but it’s primarily my cleaned-up notes -and less of a tutorial - placed here for my future self to find and provided publicly for all to benefit. These instructions are specifically tailored for setting up Jenkins on an Amazon Linux EC2 instance.

While he doesn't call it a "tutorial" it's still a great step-by-step guide to the things you'll need and the process to follow including commands, installing and starting Jenkins and configuring the environment to execute your tests. The main goal was to set it up for PHP-based applications, but he also throws in the setup of some Javascript testing via Node.js and the PhantomJS/CasperJS combo.

tagged: jenkins tutorial amazon aws instance setup configure linux unittest

Link: http://benramsey.com/blog/2014/08/setting-up-jenkins-on-amazon-linux-for-php-testing/

The Geek Stuff:
How to Configure Nginx to Execute PHP Using PHP-FPM
Dec 23, 2013 @ 11:22:01

On The Geek Stuff site there's a recent post showing you how to set up and configure Nginx to execute PHP using PHP-FPM on your linux-based system. (A related post shows some of the differences between Nginx and Apache on the same site.)

Nginx is pronounced as “Engine-X”, which is a web server and reverse proxy server. Nginx is well known for its speed and ability to handle large number of requests simultaneously with optimal use of resources. PHP-FPM stands for “PHP-FastCGI process manager”. [...] This tutorial provides instructions on how to install and configure Nginx with PHP-FPM, which will help you to execute PHP programs in Nginx.

He's broken it up into five simple steps, complete with the exact commands you'll need to make it work:

  • Install Nginx
  • Install PHP5-FPM
  • Add PHP Configuration to Nginx
  • Set listen Parameter in php5-fpm www.conf
  • Restart the Nginx and PHP5-FPM and Test it
tagged: nginx phpfpm tutorial install configure linux

Link: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2013/12/nginx-php-fpm/