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SitePoint PHP Blog:
5 Easy Ways to Get Started with PHP on Vagrant
October 30, 2014 @ 10:44:49

On the SitePoint PHP blog there's a new tutorial showing you how to get started with Vagrant and PHP to create easier, more flexible development environments via virtual machines.

Vagrant is a tool for creating and managing virtual environments that help many developers not have to care about the "works on my machine…" problem. Vagrant creates reusable development systems that can be used again and again, helping you keep your system clean of too many installations.

They offer "five easy ways" to get started including various tools and services:

You can find summaries about each of the items on the list as well as links to more information in the full post.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/5-easy-ways-getting-started-php-vagrant/

NetTuts.com:
Securing Your Server Login
October 22, 2014 @ 10:43:27

While PHP developers usually pay more attention to the code level of things, it's good to know something about managing the servers their applications live on too. In this most recent tutorial from NetTuts.com they introduce you to some of the basic things you can do to help secure your server against potential attacks, more specifically around the logins.

Thanks to the growing abundance of useful self-hosted apps such as WordPress and the affordable growth of cloud hosting providers, running your own server is becoming increasingly compelling to a broader audience. But securing these servers properly requires a fairly broad knowledge of Linux system administration; this task is not always suitable for newbies.

They provide a list of seven things to look at (not a comprehensive list, but good none the less) to protect your system logins:

  • Update Your System Components
  • Change Your SSH Port From the Default
  • Activate a Firewall
  • Change Your Root Login Name
  • Activate Google Two-Factor Authentication
  • Switch to Using SSH Keys for Login
  • Manage Your Application Security

Each item includes a summary of the "why" and commands or links to other resources with more information.

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Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/securing-your-server-login--cms-22001

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Create a Movie Recommendation App with Prediction.io - Implementation
September 16, 2014 @ 10:54:16

The SitePoint PHP blog continues their series about creating a movie prediction engine with Prediction.io in this second part focusing on implementation. In the first part of the series they set up the server and configuration to make the jump into the code. This second part gets more into the application side and features working code linking the prediction engine with the TheMovieDB API.

He jumps right into the code, showing how to:

  • Fetch the data from the TMDB (via Flight and Guzzle)
  • Populate the data back into the Prediction.io database
  • Picking a random movie from the list (and outputting it to a page)
  • Get movies the engine predicts as recommendations

The recommendations are based on ratings on other movies in the database with most of that logic happening behind the scenes instead of in the PHP script. The results are then output to the page along with the other movie data.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/create-movie-recommendation-app-prediction-io-implementation/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Create a Movie Recommendation App with Prediction.io - Setup
September 15, 2014 @ 09:47:24

On the SitePoint PHP blog today Wern Ancheta has posted the first part of a series about creating a recommendation engine with the help of PHP and a system called Prediction IO.

In this tutorial, I'm going to walk you through Prediction IO, an open-source machine learning server. It allows you to create applications that could do the following: recommend items (e.g. movies, products, food), predict user behavior, identify item similarity and rank items. You can pretty much build any machine learning application with ease using Prediction IO. You don't have to deal with numbers and algorithms and you can just concentrate on building the app itself.

He walks you through the download and install of the Prediction IO software, how to start up the server and how to access its web interface. He shows you how to create an "engine" that will be used to make the recommendations and some of the settings allowing you to tailor it to your needs. The script will hook into The Movie DB API for content. He starts in on the PHP packages that will be needed to make the API connection and recommendations, but the actual code will come in a later article.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/create-movie-recommendation-app-prediction-io-setup/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Check Your Code's Quality with SensioLabs Insight
August 07, 2014 @ 12:25:20

On the SitePoint PHP blog today there's a new post by Peter Nijssen introducing you to the SensioLabs Insight service and how it can improve your code quality (including locating security concerns).

The quality of your code is as important as testing your application. Recently, we have seen multiple articles which hopefully helped you on your way to providing a more stable application. Today, we are going to have a closer look at SensioLabs Insight. If you used Symfony or Silex in the past, you are probably familiar with SensioLabs, since they are the main sponsor of the Symfony framework.

He quickly introduces the service, mentioning what it has to offer and how to get your account all set up (free for open source libraries but it requires the results to be public). He includes some screenshots showing what the setup and scan results of your project might look like. He shows how to get more detail on the findings and how they can easily be exported to your bug tracker for fixing. He also covers some of the configuration you can do (through a YAML file) to tell Insight things like: php.ini settings, directories to exclude and specific rules to run during the scans.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/check-codes-quality-sensiolabs-insight/

Reddit.com:
PHP library authors Have you considered to arrange security bug bounties?
August 06, 2014 @ 10:39:00

In this new post to Reddit.com Timoh suggests something that could definitely help improve the overall security of the PHP ecosystem - a bug bounty system, providing libraries and projects an easy way to security-related submissions for their code.

To encourage software security research on the open-source PHP libraries we use everyday, I have been brainstorming the possibilities for us, the code authors, to start to offer security bug bounties on the projects we maintain. It is a shame such a few PHP projects encourages security research by offering bug bounties, and I think it doesn't have to be this way.

He describes his ideas for the system including the ability to offer both monetary bounties and other kinds of recognition as well. Comments on the post are largely supportive, agreeing with him that it can definitely help things. He also makes the suggestion of getting frameworks with corporate backings (like Zend Framework and Symfony) to be some of the leaders and be an example to other projects and get them on board. What do you think? Add your own thoughts and suggestions about the project to the mix!

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Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/2cpu6v/php_library_authors_have_you_considered_to/

SitePoint PHP Blog:
Diffbot Crawling with Visual Machine Learning
August 01, 2014 @ 11:37:12

On the SitePoint PHP blog Bruno Skvorc has posted a tutorial showing you how to use the Diffbot service to extract data from any page. He introduces both the service itself and walks you through a simple request via Guzzle.

Have you ever wondered how social networks do URL previews so well when you share links? How do they know which images to grab, whom to cite as an author, or which tags to attach to the preview? Is it all crawling with complex regexes over source code? Actually, more often than not, it isn't. [...] If you want to build a URL preview snippet or a news aggregator, there are many automatic crawlers available online, both proprietary and open source, but you seldom find something as niche as visual machine learning. This is exactly what Diffbot is - a "visual learning robot" which renders a URL you request in full and then visually extracts data, helping itself with some metadata from the page source as needed.

He uses a combination of a Laravel installation (via a Homestead instance) and a Guzzle request using a fetched token. The service offers a 10k call limit on a 7 day free trial, so you can sign up and grab your token there. He includes code for an example request fetching a SitePoint page and parsing out the tags. He also briefly looks at the custom handling diffbot allows based on CSS-type rules.

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Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/diffbot-crawling-visual-machine-learning/

Phil Sturgeon:
Heroku and PHP Sitting in a Tree. K.I.S.S.I.N.G
May 12, 2014 @ 09:40:49

In a recent post Phil Sturgeon talks about the recent news from Heroku about their integrated PHP support and some of his own experience in using the new service feature and migrate his blog over.

Heroku was - as far as I remember - the first (mainstream) PaaS on the market. It was Ruby-only but it was that symbol of modern web development at the time, with the whole "slinging code", "getting shit done", make a Git repo and start shipping bro, hack project/agile-til-it-works mindset. [...] Git push your code, its deployed, one-click installs and drag to scale. It sucked that it was always for Ruby, because as I was also doing a lot of work in PHP I obviously wished I could have the same for my other projects.

He walks through some of the "evolution" of the PaaS (platform as a service) market as it related to PHP environments. He talks about other services like PHPFog, Pagodabox and Fortrabbit. The Heroku added true PHP support and he made his move. He goes through the steps he followed to get his blog migrated over and the commands needed to make the push.

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Link: http://philsturgeon.co.uk/blog/2014/05/heroku-and-php-sitting-in-a-tree

Jurian Sluiman:
SoflomoCache manage your ZF2 cache services
May 09, 2014 @ 09:53:32

Jurian Sluiman has posted about the release of a tool that aims to help you with cache handling in your Zend Framework 2 applications, the SoflomoCache component.

aching is an essential part in scaling your application, but Zend Framework 2 was missing a utility to manage your caches. Until now! During deployments we usually flushed the cache in a tedious and cumbersome way by directly accessing the apc_* functions in a custom script. This could certainly be improved and so we wrote a command line utility to manage all our cache services.

He includes a few snippets of code showing how to implement the component in your configuration and use it via ZF2's dependency injection handling. He also includes a list of the commands that can be used along with it to flush the cache, either all simultaneously or a single one (defined as a CLI option). It can also flush by namespace and handle the refresh of your combined configuration and module map.

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Link: https://juriansluiman.nl/article/134/soflomo-cache-manage-your-zf2-cache-services

Oracle Technology Network:
Installing PHP on Oracle HTTP Server 12c
April 25, 2014 @ 09:41:26

On the Oracle Technology Network site today they've posted an updated version of their guide to getting PHP installed on Oracle HTTP Server 12c, complete with all the commands you'll need to get the job done.

This article shows how to install PHP on Oracle HTTP Server 12c (OHS). PHP is a hugely popular, interpreted scripting language commonly used for web applications. OHS is the web server component for Oracle Fusion Middleware. It is based on the Apache HTTP Server. OHS includes a FastCGI module which can easily be configured to use PHP's bundled FastCGI Process Manager ("PHP-FPM"). PHP-FPM has become a standard way of installing PHP. I

The remainder of the post is broken down into the steps you'll need to get it all installed and working:

  • Install Oracle Linux
  • Install Oracle HTTP Server
  • Install Oracle Instant Client 12c
  • Install PHP
  • Configure PHP-FPM
  • Configure OHS
  • Start PHP-FPM & OHS

A simple test script (a phpinfo) is also included to help you ensure everything is running as it should be.

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oracle install http server 12c tutorial guide

Link: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/dsl/jones-php-ohs-2194096.html


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